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Publication numberUS3590890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1971
Filing dateFeb 3, 1969
Priority dateFeb 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3590890 A, US 3590890A, US-A-3590890, US3590890 A, US3590890A
InventorsEinar T Young
Original AssigneeSun Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle for liquid-fuel-dispensing apparatus
US 3590890 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Elnar T. Young Newtovn Square, Pa.

[21 1 Appl, No. 796,003

[22] Filed Feb. 3, 1969 [45] Patented July 6, 1971 [73 I Assignee Sun Oil Ounpany Philadelphia, Pa.

Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 746,165, July 19, 1968, now abandoned.

{54] NOZZLE FOR LiQUlD-FUEL-DISPENSING APPARATUS 7 Claims, 10 Drawing Fig.

[52] U.S.CI 141/192, 14l/l98,l4l/352,l41/382 [5i] B67d5/373 (50] F1e1do1Seareh.......... 141/39- -43, l92 19 5 198 iii 8 555314115, 217, 225-229, 290, as 352. 382, 346; 222/74, 15

[56] Relerences Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,148,713 9/1964 Jones, Jr .4 141/346 563,464 7/1896 Fahmey 6. 141/217 X 2,058,061 10/1936 Clinch 141/41 2,326,415 8/1943 Titus 141/41 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,057,493 2/1967 Great Britain..............., 141/346 Primary Examiner Laverne D. Geiger Assistant Examiner-Edward J. Earls Attorneys-George L. Church, Donald R. Johnson, Wilmer E.

McCorquodale, Jr. and Frank A. Rechif ABSTRACT: A nozzle, for use with liquid-fueLdispensing apparatus employing a liquid fuel pump, carries electrical control means which permits the pump to be energized only when the nozzle is properly inserted into the metallic fill pipe ofa fuel tank. Automatic shutoff means, associated with a return vapor line extending from the fuel tank to a vacuum pump in the housing of the dispensing apparatus, is provided to stop the dispensing of fuel when the tank is full.

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EINAR T. YOUNG BY TTY.

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NOZZLE FOR LlQUID-FUEL-DISPENSING APPARATUS This application is a continuation-in-part of my prior copending application, Ser. No. 746,165, filed July 19, 1968, now abandoned.

This invention relates to nozzles for liquid-fuel-dispensing apparatus, such as the apparatus utilized at service stations for dispensing gasoline into the fuel tanks of automobiles.

At the present time, the trend in gasoline merchandising is toward a self-service type of operation, one wherein the customer dispenses the gasoline into his own fuel tank. Prior, known gasoline-dispensing apparatus suffers from several drawbacks which render it unsuitable for a self-service type of operation.

In the first place, from the safety standpoint, the prior apparatus is not as safe as it should be, because the customer has complete control of the dispensing nozzle; for example, there is nothing which stops the flow of gasoline when this nozzle is not in the fillpipe of the fuel tank, which is to say that there is no safeguard against either the purposeful or accidental abuse of the dispensing apparatus including the nozzle. Also, prior automatic shutoff devices (the purpose of which is to shut off the flow of gasoline from the nozzle when the fuel tank is full) often fail to operate properly, creating a hazardous condition.

In the second place, the dispensing nozzles in common use today are heavy, large, and awkward to handle, and are so mounted that some gasoline invariably drips down onto the nozzle handle between dispensing operations; thus, they are also at least odoriferous, if not actually dirty.

In the third place, the gasoline-dispensing apparatus in common use today is rather complicated to operate, involving a rather large number of operations including among others the manual opening ofa nozzle valve and the manual setting ofa three-position latch for the automatic shutoff action (if a "fill" operation is contemplated).

The foregoing has taken into account only the prior art nozzle itself plus the appurtenances directly associated therewith. There are additional drawbacks in the other parts of the prior dispensing apparatus which contribute to the unsuitability of the overall apparatus for self-service operation; however, these latter are outside the scope of the present invention.

Although self-service operation has been mentioned previously, the improved apparatus according to the present invention, which is particularly suitable for self-service operation, is also more efficient and simpler operating, which makes it desirable even for attended operation.

An object of this invention is to provide improved nozzles for liquid-fuel-dispensing apparatus.

Another object is to provide gasoline dispensing nozzles having incorporated therein control means which acts to prevent the flow of gasoline through the nozzle unless the same is properly positioned in the fillpipe of a fuel tank.

A further object is to provide dispensing nozzles having simplified and substantially foolproof automatic shutoff means incorporated therein.

A still further object is to provide, in dispensing nozzles, shutoff means which operate completely automatically and thus do not require any manual manipulations.

An additional object is to provide dispensing nozzles which are lighter, smaller, and cleaner than prior art nozzles.

The objects of this invention are accomplished, briefly, in the following manner: A liquid-fuel-dispensing nozzle, which is designed to be inserted for dispensing purposes into the metallic fillpipe of a fuel tank, is provided with a pair of spaced external metallic surfaces electrically insulated from each other, the arrangement being such that when the nozzle is properly inserted into the fillpipe both of these surfaces contact the fillpipe, the fillpipe then forming a conductive path between these two surfaces. These two surfaces are electrically connected effectively in series in the energization circuit for the liquid fuel pump. The hose assembly which extends from the housing of the dispensing apparatus to the dispensing nozzle includes a conduit for conveying vapors from the vapor space in the fuel tank to the apparatus housing, a vacuum pump being connected to this conduit. A pair of electrical contacts, which are connected effectively in series with the aforementioned surfaces in the pump energization circuit, are actuated in response to a pressure change in the vapor conduit. These two contacts are normally closed during dispensing, but are opened in response to the pressure change in the vapor conduit when the fuel tank becomes full. Alternatively, for automatic shutoff, a pair of series contacts are opened by a float member positioned in the vapor conduit.

A detailed description of the invention follows, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view, partly broken away to show interior details, of one form of nozzle according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view looking at the discharge end of the FIG. 1 nozzle;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal section taken along line 3-3 of FIG.

FIG. 4 is a view, on an enlarged scale, of a detail;

FIG. Sis a transverse section taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a combined block and schematic diagram illustrating the liquid, mechanical, and electrical connections of various elements involved in a dispensing apparatus employing the nozzle of FIGS. l5;

FIG. 7 is a rear elevation of another form of nozzle, the hoses being omitted;

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal section taken along line 8-8 of FIG.

FIG. 9 is a diagram generally similar to FIG. 6 but employing the nozzle ofFIGS. 7-8; and

FIG. 10 is a vertical section through a vacuum switch used in an automatic shutoff arrangement.

Referring now to FIGS. l5, the upper end of a dispensing nozzle according to a first embodiment of the invention comprises an elongated chambered body or housing 1 in the form of a metallic casting. Housing I has an elliptical outer configuration at its upper end (see FIG. 5) and a cylindrical outer configuration at its lower end, so is shaped somewhat like a funnel. To the lower (cylindrical) end of housing 1 is secured (as by brazing or welding) the upper end of a tubular metallic snout 2. The longitudinal axis or centerline of the housing I is straight, but the lower end of snout 2 is curved or bent in one plane (see FIG. 3, which can be considered to be essentially a side view of the nozzle) so that it can be readily inserted into the fillpipe of an automobile's fuel tank. To the lower end of snout 2 is sealingly secured one end of a metallic tip member 3 in the form of an open-ended hollow body of generally cylindrical outer configuration. The opposite end of tip member 3 is the discharge end of the nozzle. The snout 1 and the tip member 3 together may be thought of as comprising the outer (generally lower, when the nozzle is in use for dispensing) end portion of the nozzle.

A central tube 4, which has a curvature matching that of the snout 2, is mounted concentrically within this snout, and centrally of the housing I (see FIG. 5). The CD. of tube 4 is smaller than the ID. of snout 2, leaving an annular region or space 5 between these two members. The lower end of tube 4 is secured in a fluidtight manner to the upper open end of a central integral hollow hub 6 formed in tip member 3, the lower end of this hub being closed. Hub 6 is supported in member 3 by means of four equiangularly disposed radially extending hollow spokes 7 (see FIG. 2) each of which provides a respective passage 8 communicating at its inner end with the interior of hub 6 (and thus also with the interior of tube 4) and at its outer end with the exterior of the nozzle. It may be noted that the four somewhat triangular areas 9 between adjacent spokes 7 provide communication between the angular region 5 and the lower end of tip member 3 (i.e., the discharge end of the nozzle). It is desired to be pointed out, at this juncture, that the annular space S and the areas 9 together provide a fluid path for the liquid fuel downwardly through the nozzle, while the passages 8, the interior of hub 6,

and the central tube 4 provide a path for air and vapor upwardly through the nozzle.

The lower cylindrical end of housing I (to which the upper end of snout 2 is secured) is open, and helps to provide the upper end of annular space 5. The upper elliptical end of the funnel-shaped housing I as cast is closed, but this end wall is drilled to provide therein three apertures or openings l3, l9, and 25 which are located side by side, horizontally (see H6. 1, which is a top or plan view). The outer ends of the three hoses of a triple-conduit hose combination (denoted generally by numeral are separately secured by means of fittings in respective ones of the three openings just referred to. The three conduits of the combination 10 provide entirely separate and individual flow passages, but these conduits are located side by side and the hose combination is molded as an integral unit. The hoses are formed from some suitable material which is somewhat flexible and is substantially unaffected by gasoline.

A first liquid fuel hose ll of the combination 10 is secured in any well-known manner to a metallic hose coupling 12 which is mounted in housing aperture 13 by means of a set screw l4 threaded through the sidewall of housing 1, the inner end of screw 14 extending into a circumferential groove 15 formed in coupling 12, an O-ring 16 (positioned in a suitable groove in coupling l2, and engaging the wall of housing opening 13) being utilized for sealing purposes. During fuel dispensing, gasoline may flow through hose ll in the direction of the arrow labeled Gasoline."

A second liquid fuel hose 1'! of the combination 10 (the reason for using two fuel hoses being explained hereinafter) is secured in any well-known manner to a metallic hose coupling 18 which is mounted in housing aperture 19 by means ofa set screw 20 threaded through the sidewall of housing l, the inner end of screw 20 extending into a circumferential groove 21 formed in coupling 18, an O-ring 22 (positioned in a suitable groove in coupling l8, and engaging the wall of housing opening 19) being utilized for sealing purposes. During fuel dispensing, gasoline may flow through hose ]7 in the direction of the arrow labeled Gasoline.

The two fuel hoses I1 and 17 are preferably the outer ones of the hose combination 10. The central hose 23 of the hose combination 10, during dispensing, normally carries vapor and air in the direction of the arrow so legended. Hose 23 is secured in any well-known manner to a metallic hose coupling 24 which is mounted in housing aperture 25, an O-ring 26 (positioned in a suitable groove in coupling 24, and engaging the wall of housing opening being utilized for sealing purposes.

Since the end of hose 23 opposite to the noule is connected to a vacuum pump (as will later be explained), the force on coupling 24 is such as to normally urge it inwardly, so no special securing means for this coupling is necessary. The upper end of tube 4 is sealed to the inwardly projecting end of coupling 24 by means of an O-ring 27, which is positioned in a suitable groove in this inwardly projecting end and engages the inner wall of tube 4.

Although the bores of couplings l2 and l8 are separate from each other, there are provided in the housing I passages by means of which (when the inner ends ofthese couplings are open) the fluid fuel (gasoline) being carried by the hosecoupling combination ll, l2 may mix with the fluid (gasoline) being carried by the hose-coupling combination l7, l8. See FIG. 5. lnwardly beyond that portion of the (cylindrical) wall of aperture 13 which is engaged by O-ring l6 (and immediately inwardly of the inner end of coupling 12, when the device is assembled), there is provided in the radially inner arcuate portion of the wall of aperture 13 a cutout or gap 28 which opens into the space within housing 1 surrounding the upper end of tube 4, this gap 28 in effect providing a channel which forms a continuation of the annular space 5, above the upper end of snout 2; thus, a fluid channel is provided within housing 1 between the inner end of coupling 12 and the annular space 5, proper. in a similar manner, there is provided in the radially inner arcuate portion of the wall of aperture 19 a cutout or gap 29 which opens into the space within housing I surrounding the upper end of tube 4, this gap 29 in effect providing a channel which forms a continuation of the annular space 5, above the upper end of snout 2; thus, a fluid channel is provided within housing 1 between the inner end of coupling 18 and the annular space 5, proper. Therefore, fluids carried by either or both of the hoses ll and 17 may flow to annular space 5.

It will be appreciated that, when the inner ends of couplings l2 and 18 are open, the liquid fuel being carried by hose [1 will mix or blend with the liquid fuel being carried by hose [7, at a location beyond the inner ends of couplings l2 and 18 and within housing 1, and the blended liquid will enter the annular space S and will flow downwardly through this space or region and through the areas 9 and will issue from the discharge end of the nozzle (lower open end of tip member 3). It may be seen that the gap 28 provides a fluid flow channel between hose coupling 12 and the annular space 5, and the gap 29 provides a fluid flow channel between hose coupling 18 and this same annular space. Of course, if the inner end of only one of these couplings (l2 or 1B) is open, fluid will flow through only that one coupling into the annular space 5, and out the discharge end of the nozzle.

As will be explained hereinafter, the ends of the hoses ll and 17 opposite to the nozzle ends illustrated are coupled to the discharges of separate respective pressure type (positive displacement) liquid fuel pumps. During each dispensing operation, liquid fuel will be pumped under pressure through the hose ll alone, or through the hose l7 alone, or through both of the hoses II and 17 simultaneously (depending upon the particular blend" or grade" of gasoline that is being dispensed during that particular operation). An antidrain" valve is provided for each of the hoses ll and 17, to prevent the liquid fuel from draining out of these hoses through the nozzle after the dispensing operation is finished (which is to say, after the liquid fuel pumps have been turned off).

One face of a sealing disc 30, made of a suitable packing or sealing material, is attached to a metallic supporting member 31, in such a position that the opposite face of this disc can come into sealing relation with the inner end of coupling 18. Disc 30 is normally urged into sealing relation with coupling 18 by means of a coiled compression spring 32 one end of which bears against the radially outer area of the essentially planar member 31, on the side of this member opposite to disc 30. Around its outer edge, spaced portions of the member 31 are bent outwardly from the plane of this member, in the direction away from disc 30, to provide a plurality of integral, spaced tabs 33 which serve as spring retaining and guiding means.

The opposite end of spring 32 bears against an internal shoulder 34 formed in body I, which provides an abutment for this spring. It may be noted that because of gap 29 this shoulder does not extend through a full 360; however, it does extend through a sufficient number of degrees to provide a suitable abutment for the spring.

The spring 32 normally biases disc 30 into sealing engagement with coupling 18, in the absence of the pressured flow of gasoline through hose 17. However, when gasoline is being pumped under pressure through this hose, this pressure overcomes the force of spring 32, so that disc 30 is pushed away from coupling 18, and the gasoline can then flow in substantially unimpeded fashion from hose l7 and coupling 18 into housing 1 and thence out of the nozzle through the annular space 5. When the pump is turned off, thus removing the pressure, spring 32 returns disc 30 into sealing engagement with coupling ll, preventing the gasoline present in hose l7 (between the pump discharge and disc 30) from draining out of the hose; hence the term antidrain valve. Of course, when the gasoline drains out of the lower end of the nozzle (between the disc 30 and the discharge end of the nozzle), atmospheric pressure will assist the spring 32 in maintaining the disc 30 sealed against coupling 18.

A duplicate antidrain valve, exactly similar to that just described, is provided for coupling 12 (and hose ll). Similar elements in this latter valve are denoted by the same reference numerals, but carrying prime designations. The description need not be repeated. The operation of this latter valve (for coupling l2 and hose 1 l) is exactly similar to the action of the antidrain valve (described in detail) for coupling 18 and hose 17.

A pistol grip handle 35 (see FIG. 3) is provided on the nozzle, this handle being secured to the body 1 by means ofa bolt 36 which passes centrally through the handle and threads into a tapped hole in an integral boss 37 formed on the cast body 1.

As has been indicated previously, the nonle of this invention is particularly applicable to dispensing apparatus of the type wherein a number of "grades of gasoline may be dispensed selectively from a single apparatus, the grade selected for a particular dispensing operation or sale being provided by the proportioned "blending" of two gasoline blending components of different octane ratings. In addition, the range of grades" which can be dispensed generally includes solely one blending component, and solely the other blending component. Gasoline dispensing apparatus of the aforementioned "blending type is disclosed in my U.S. Pat. No. 2,880,908 and also in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,232,484. Such apparatus utilizes two pumps, one for each of the two blending components; by way of example, and as will be described further hereinafter, gasoline hose 1] would be coupled to the discharge side of one pump, and gasoline hose 17 would be coupled to the discharge side of the other pump.

According to this invention, a control means is provided which permits the liquid fuel dispensing pumps to be energized only when the nozzle is properly inserted into the fillpipe of an automobile fuel tank, thus providing a safety feature desirable for self-service use; this feature prevents the hazard arising from the spilling of fuel by a careless or unskilled user. One embodiment of such a control means is presented in FIGS. 1-7, and will now be described.

Just above the curved lower end of snout 2, a generally cylindrical sleeve 38 of electrical insulating material is secured to the outside of this snout, and to the outside of sleeve 38 is secured a cylindrical metallic sleeve electrode 39. This electrode provides an external metallic surface on the nozzle. At its lower end, electrode 39 has a portion of increased thickness providing an upwardly facing external annular ledge or shoulder 40. The insulating sleeve 38 has a thicker portion at its lower end to provide an abutment for the thicker portion of metallic sleeve 39, and a washer 41 of electrical insulating material, secured to the sleeve 38, provides an insulating abutment for the upper end of metallic electrode 39.

Refer now to FIG. 6. When the dispensing nozzle described is inserted into the metallic fillpipe 42 of an automobile fuel tank for dispensing purposes, it necessarily must contact such fillpipe at at least two spaced points, one of these ordinarily being on the metallic tip member 3 or on the metallic snout 2, at or near the lower end of the nozzle. The tip member 3 and/or snout 2 provide an external metallic surface on the nozzle. For proper insertion of the nozzle (to effectuate dispensing) the other of these two points must be located on the metallic electrode 39, the shoulder 40 being provided on this electrode for engagement under the downwardly facing shoulder 43 (normally provided for the closure cap of the fuel tank) on the fillpipe 42, as illustrated in FIG. 6.

To make sure that the nozzle is not inserted into the fillpipe 42 too far, which might prevent the electrode 39 from making contact with the fillpipe, a pair of limiting abutments are provided on body I, at the upper end of electrode 39. These limit ing abutments comprise a pair of diametrically opposite rigid fins 47 which extend radially outwardly from the nozzle body I at the lower end thereof, the lower ends of these fins lying in the same transverse plane as the upper end of the insulating washer 41, and the upper ends of these fins merging into the body 1 at its enlarged upper end. The diametral span of fins 47 is greater than the diameter of the fillpipe 42, thus preventing insertion of the nozzle into the fillpipe beyond the lower ends of these fins. That is to say, the lower ends of fins 47 form an abutment which prevent insertion of housing 1 into the fillpipe.

When the nozzle described previously is properly inserted into the fillpipe 42, an electrically conducting path is provided, by the metallic fillpipe, between the lower metallic portion of the nozzle and the electrode 39. This completes an electrical circuit which enables the fuel pumps to be energized, as will later be described. Unless the nozzle is properly inserted in the fillpipe in this manner (so that contact is made with the fillpipe at two spaced points, one of which is on electrode 39 and the other of which is on the metallic end portion of the nozzle), the fuel pumps cannot be energized.

A metallic (electrically conducting) pin 44 is rigidly mechanically (and electrically) connected at its two opposite ends to electrode 39, this pin passing diametrically through aligned apertures provided in tubular snout 2 and in the central tube 4, the pin being suitably sealed in these apertures so that leakage of gasoline does not occur around the pin (since the pin passes through annular space 5). Pin 44 is electrically insulated from snout 2 and from tube 4 by means of a pair of oppositely disposed grommets 45 of electrical insulating material.

The central portion of pin 44 passes through an elliptical opening 48 provided in a plug member 46 of electrical insulating material (to be further referred to hereinafter) which is positioned substantially on the axis of tube 4. The shape of the opening 48 enables member 46 to move with respect to pin 44. The bare lower end 49 of an insulated electrical lead 50 is mechanically secured to member 46, the wire end 49 passing through slot 48 in a direction at to the axis of pin 44 and above this pin; however, such direction and the axis of pin 44 are both transverse to the axis of tube 4. During dispensing, the wire end 49 is mechanically urged into electrical contact with pin 44 by means ofa coiled compression spring 51 one end of which bears against an upwardly facing shoulder (abutment) provided at the lower end of member 46 and the other end of which bears against pin 44; spring 51 biases member 46 downwardly, that is, toward the discharge end of the nozzle. Thus, lead 50 is normally (during dispensing) electrically connected to electrode 39, by way of pin 44. When the fuel in the fuel tank reaches a certain level (corresponding approximately to "full") the electrical connection between lead 50 and pin 44 is broken, as will be described hereinafter. This provides an automatic shutoff for a full tank.

The upper end of lead 50 (which lead has some slack therein, as illustrated in FIG. 3) is electrically connected to a metallic contact ring 52 which is suitably secured within tube 4 near the upper end thereof, this ring being electrically insulated from tube 4 by means ofa sleeve 53 ofinsulating material interposed between ring 52 and the inner wall of the tube. A similar metallic contact ring 54 is secured within coupling 24 and is electrically insulated therefrom by means ofa sleeve 55 of insulating material interposed between this ring and coupling 24. One end of a resilient metallic connector 56 is secured to ring 54, and the opposite end of this connector resiliently contacts ring 52. The lower bare end of an insulated electrical conductor 57 is electrically connected to ring 54, and the other end of this latter conductor extends through hose 23 to a housing 58 (FIG. 6) which houses the gasoline pumps and other components of the dispensing apparatus. it will be appreciated that the conductor 57 is electrically connected to the lead 50 (and also to electrode 39, when the fuel tank is not "full") by way ofitems 54, 56, 52, 50, 49, and 44.

It is customary in the dispensing of gasoline into the fuel tanks of motor vehicles to provide a grounding" electrical connection between the fillpipe 42 of the motor vehicle fuel tank and the metallic housing of the dispensing apparatus. This is effected in the nozzle being described in a more or less conventional manner. The metallic tip member 3 and snout 2, which metallically contact the fillpipe 42 at at least one point, are metallically connected through the nozzle body 1 to the metallic pipe couplings l2, l8, and 24, and one or more if not all of these latter couplings are metallically connected to the outer ends of conventional metallic braids or metallic springs 59 provided in each of the hoses ll, 17, and 23. These springs mechanically reinforce or strengthen the hoses, as well as providing the required electrical ground connections. The inner ends of these springs are electrically connected as at 60 (FIG. 6) to the grounded housing 58.

Now referring to this latter figure, the apparatus housing indicated at 58 (which is grounded as illustrated) may be of generally conventional type, locked against unauthorized access, and provided with windows and various operating devices accessible from the outside of the housing, as will hereafter appear. Generally speaking, the two gasoline blending components previously referred to comprise (l a relative low-octane gasoline (referred to herein as a low gasoline, as in my U.S. Pat. No. 3,232,484 previously mentioned) and (2) a relatively high-octane gasoline (referred to herein as a high" gasoline, as in U.S. Pat, No. 3,232,484. Included in the apparatus in housing 58 is a low" gasoline pump 6! driven by a motor 62 and provided with an inlet connection 63 from the low" supply tank. The low" gasoline to be dispensed flows through connection 64 and a conventional "low" meter 65 and thence through the pipe connection 66 incorporating a check valve 67. A bypass 86 is provided containing a relief valve 87 to bypass the pump 61 in the event a delivery valve is closed.

A pump 68 for the high" gasoline draws its supply of high gasoline from a tank through pipe connection 69. This pump 68 may be of the same type as the "low" pump 6] and may in some cases be driven by a separate motor 70. However, in actual practice it may be more desirable to drive both of the pumps 61 and 68 by a single, common motor. The high gasoline pump 68 delivers the high" gasoline through line H to the "high" meter 72 which may be of the type serving to meter the low" gasoline. Delivery from the meter 72 takes place through piping 73 which includes the check valve 74. Associated with the pump 68 is a bypass 88 incorporating a relief valve 89.

The low and "high gasolines delivered, respectively, through lines 66 and 73, are respectively controlled by the proportioning valves 75 and 76, from which they are delivered through the hoses ll and 17 of the hose combination [0, the inner end of hose ll being connected (inside housing 58) to the outlet side of valve 75 and the inner end of hose [7 being connected (inside housing 58) to the outlet side of valve 76. (The outer ends of hoses ll and 17 are connected to the nozzle body I in the manner previously described.) As previously described, the hose passages are maintained separate, communicating with each other only at the inner ends of couplings l2 and 18 (which are close to the discharge end of the nozzle). Thus, admixture of the two gasoline blending components cannot take place to any substantial degree so as to markedly change the composition dispensed.

The solid connecting lines provided with arrows in FIG. 6 indicate mechanical connections, while the solid connecting lines without arrows indicate electrical connections, The low meter 65 provides one input 77 to a blend selecting, controlling, and counting unit 78, the other input to which is provided at 79 from "high" meter 72. The unit 78 may preferably comprise various gear boxes, differentials, counters, a variator, etc., interconnected and functioning in the manner disclosed in my copending application, Ser. No. 850,901, filed Aug. I8, 1969, and in my U.S. Pat. No. 2,880,908 previously identified. As disclosed in said application and patent, the unit 78 includes a final blend controlling differential the mechanical output of which at 80 controls concurrently the relative positions of the "low" and "high" proportioning valves 75 and 76.

One terminal of a low-voltage electrical power source 81 is grounded at 82. For convenience, source 81 is illustrated as a battery, but this source may be provided by means of suitable solid-state circuitry; in any event, its voltage must be intrinsically safe since such voltage is applied to the nozzle electrode 39, closely adjacent the gasoline-dispensing end of the nozzle.

For convenience, a greatly simplified circuit is illustrated in FIG. 6; in a commercial embodiment, a more sophisticated circuit would be employed, as disclosed in my above-mentioned copending application.

As previously described, the outer or nozzle end of conductor 57 is connected to lead 50. The inner end of conductor 57 (which conductor extends through hose 23 from the nozzle to housing 58) is connected (inside housing 58) to one of the two single-pole contacts associated with each of a plurality of parallel-connected pushbuttons 83 each operating a pair of single-pole contacts. The other contacts associated with pushbuttons 83 are paralleled and connected to one end of operating coil 84 of a relay 85; the other end of coil 84 is connected to the ungrounded terminal of source 81. Thus, when any one of the pushbuttons 83 is depressed sufficiently to close its (normally open) single-pole contacts, a circuit is completed from the ungrounded terminal of source 81 to electrode 39 (provided wire end 49 is in contact with pin 44), as follows: ungrounded terminal of source 81, relay coil 84, the closed contacts of the pushbutton 83 which has been depressed, conductor 57, ring 54, connector 56, ring 52, lead 50, pin 44, and nozzle electrode 39. If at this time the nozzle is properly positioned in the fillpipe 42, a circuit is completed from electrode 39 through the fillpipe 42 to ground (and the grounded terminal of source 81) by way of tip member 3 (or snout 2), the nozzle body I, the hose spring 59, and ground connection 60. When this circuit is thus completed, relay coil 84 is energized to operate relay 85 to its "energized" position (it is illustrated in its unenergized position in FIG. 6).

As disclosed in my copending application previously referred to, a particular one of the pushbuttons 83 is selected for operation according to a particular grade" of gasoline desired to be dispensed. When this selection has been made and the appropriate pushbutton 83 depressed, the "blend selection" is thereafter made automatically, as disclosed in said application, and (provided the nozzle is then properly positioned in fillpipe 42) relay 85 is operated, as previously described. The pushbutton which is depressed is held in this position by a suitable mechanical locking means (to be later described in more detail), enabling the dispensing operation to continue without the necessity of manually maintaining the pushbutton depressed. The operation of relay 85 moves the dual proportioning valve 75, 76 to its "on" position and energizes the pump motors 62 and 70, causing dispensing of the gasoline to begin, as will presently be described in more detail. The dispensing will continue until a predetermined (and preset) number of dollars worth of gasoline has been dispensed (at which time there will be an automatic termination of the dispensing), or until the fuel tank is "full" (at which time the automatic shutoff means hereinafter described will terminate the operation). It may be observed here that the electrode 39 is connected in a series circuit with relay coil 84, so that this coil cannot be energized unless both the nozzle electrode 39 and the lower metallic portion (tip member 3, or snout 2) of the nozzle are in contact with the metallic fillpipe 42.

A solenoid is arranged, when energized, to mechanically move the shoes in the dual proportioning valve 75, 76 to an "open" or "on" position, and when deenergized, to return the shoes to a closed or off position. The dual valve 75, 76 is thus "closed" except when solenoid 90 is energized. In connection with the dual valve 75, 76, it is desired to be pointed out that the "high" valve 76 and the "low" valve 75 each utilize a separate valve shoe in a separate chamber, but both valves shoes are operated by a single, common operating shaft; this dual proportioning valve may be constructed, for example, as disclosed in my U.S. Pat. No. 2,977,970. One end of solenoid 90 is connected directly to one side of a l l5-volt alternating current source 91, while the other end of this solenoid is connected through the normally open pair of contacts 92 of relay 85 to the other side of source 91; thus, when relay 85 is operated as above described to begin the dispensing, the contacts 92 close to energize the solenoid 90 from source 91. This moves the shoes in the dual valve 75, 76 to the open" position. When relay 85 is deenergized, its contacts 92 open to deenergize the solenoid 90, which moves the valve shoes in valve 75, 76 to the "olf" or "closed" position.

Although not illustrated in FIG. 6, the solenoid 90 also has a mechanical connection to the array 83 of pushbuttons, which connection operates in such a way that when one of the pushbuttons 83 is depressed to start the dispensing (thereby operating relay 85 and energizing solenoid 90), that particular pushbutton is held in (thereby to hold its associated contacts closed). This enables the dispensing operation to continue without the necessity of manually maintaining the pushbutton depressed. The pushbuttons 83 are spring loaded, so that when solenoid 90 is deenergized, the aforementioned mechanical connection is in effect released and the depressed pushbutton is then returned to its deactivated position, wherein its associated contacts are open.

One supply terminal of motor 70 is connected directly to one side of source 91, while the other supply terminal of this motor is connected through the normally open pair of contacts 93 of relay 85 to the other side of source 91; thus, when relay 85 is operated, the contacts 93 close to energize pump motor 70 from source 91. The "high" pump 68 is then activated or turned on to deliver high" gasoline from the corresponding supply tank out through piping 73. When relay 85 is deenergized, its contacts 93 open to deenergize the motor 70, deactivating or turning pump 68 off.

One supply terminal of motor 62 is connected directly to one side of source 9!, while the other supply terminal of this motor is connected through the normally open pair of contacts 94 of relay 85 to the other side of source 9]; thus, when relay 85 is operated, the contacts 94 close to energize pump motor 62 from source 91. The "low pump 61 is then activated or turned "on" to deliver "low" gasoline from the corresponding supply tank out through piping 66. When relay 85 is deenergized, its contacts 94 open to deenergize the motor 62, deactivating or turning pump 6] off.

As above stated, a single motor may be used for operating both of the pumps 61 and 68. In this event, of course, only one pair of pump motor contacts (93 or 94) would be needed on relay 85.

As previously described, the outer end of hose 23 is connected via hose coupling 24 to the upper end of tube 4. The inner end of this hose is connected (inside housing 58) to the suction side of a vacuum pump 95 the other side of which is connected via a pipe 96 to the vapor space in one or both of the supply tanks, or to a suitable vapor disposal/recovery system. The pump 95 is arranged to be activated at the same time as pumps 6! and 68, such as by mechanically driving this pump by the fuel pump motor; pump 95 is therefore deactivated at the same time as pumps 61 and 68. During dispensing, the vacuum pump 95 draws air and vapor out of the vapor space in the automobile fuel tank by way of the passages 8, tube 4, and hose 23.

Summarizing the foregoing, if the nozzle has been properly inserted into the fillpipe 42, then when one of the pushbuttons 83 is depressed a circuit is completed to coil 84 of relay 85, operating this relay. When relay 85 operates, solenoid 90 is energized to open" the valve 75, 76, and pumps 61 and 68 are activated by motors 62 and 70, respectively, or by the single motor which may be used, to pump gasoline through either one or both of the hoses 11 and 17 to the nozzle, the pump discharge pressure causing opening of one or both of the "antidrain" valves 30, 30' so that the gasoline flows via annular space to the discharge end of the nozzle; at this same time. pump 95 is activated to withdraw air and vapor out of the fuel tank via tube 4 and hose 23. All of the above actions occur upon the operation of relay 85.

The nozzle described thus far includes an automatic shutoff means of simplified construction, for automatically stopping the dispensing of fuel when the motor vehicle fuel tank is full.

Such an automatic shutoff means is essential, particularly for a self-service type of operation. it will take care of both the customer who desires his fuel tank filled, and also the customer who desires only a specified number of dollars worth of gasoline, but whose tank does not actually have room for this amount of gasoline. One embodiment of the automatic shutoff means will now be described.

The upper end of a rigid metallic rod 97 of small diameter is firmly secured as by a threaded connection to the lower portion of plug member 46, below the opening 48. See FIG. 4. Rod 97, which extends approximately axially of tube 4, is bent to match the curvature of tube 4, and the lower end of this rod is firmly secured as by a threaded connection to the upper end of a hollow float 98 made of a material of sufficiently low density, such as a suitable thermoplastic. The float 98 hangs rather freely in tube 4, being supported therein only by means of rod 97. Normally, the force of gravity (due to the weight of float 98 and rod 97) acts in such a direction as to pull plug member 46 downwardly, which assists the force of spring 51 in keeping the wire end 49 in engagement with pin 44.

The lower end of float 98 is located just above the upper end of hub 6. Assuming that the snout 2 and tip member 3 of the nozzle are in place in the fillpipe 42 and that the dispensing of gasoline into the lillp'pe is taking place through the nozzle, then when the level of liquid in the fuel tank approaches the "full" condition, the liquid rises into the fillpipe 42. When the liquid level rises sufficiently, some of the liquid fuel will enter one or more of the passages 8. The flow of the liquid gasoline into these passages will be rather turbulent, due to the suction action applied to tube 4 and to these passages by the vacuum pump 95. The liquid, being drawn upwardly through passages 8 and the hollow hub 6 by means of the vacuum pump 95, will quickly strike the bottom of float 98 with a sudden rather sharp impact, driving this float upwardly in tube 4. This in turn, by means of rod 97, pushes plug member 46 and wire end 49 (attached to this plug member) upwardly with respect to the fixed or stationary pin 44, breaking the electrical connection between lead 50 and pin 44 (electrode 39).

Since the lead 50 and pin 44 are included in series in the energization circuit for relay coil 84, the opening of the electrical connection between these two items causes deenergizetion of relay 85, opening its pairs of contacts 92, 93, and 94. The opening of relay contacts 92 deenergizes solenoid 90, quickly moving the dual proportioning valve 75, 76 to the closed" position and positively cutting off the flow of gasoline through the hose combination 10 to the nozzle. The opening of relay contacts 93 deenergizes motor 70, deactivating the high" gasoline pump 68, while the opening of relay contacts 94 deenergizes motor 62, deactivating the "low" gasoline pump 61. The actual dispensing operation or "sale is thus tenninated.

Even though the initial opening of the contacts 49 (or 50) and 44 in response to movement of the float 98 may be only momentary, the dispensing apparatus disclosed herein will not become reactivated, even though these contacts reclose subsequently. As described in the preceding paragraph, the initial opening of the float-controlled contacts 50, 44 results in the deenergization of solenoid 90. When solenoid is deenergized, the mechanical connection between this solenoid and that one of the pushbuttons 83 which has been operated (to start the dispensing) is released, allowing this pushbutton to be returned (by its spring) to its deactivated or open position. This means that all of the pushbuttons 83 will then be in their open positions. Since these pushbuttons are in series in the energization circuit for coil 84 of relay 85, this relay cannot be operated (to energize the pump motors 62 and 70, etc.) to reactivate the dispensing apparatus, even though the contacts 50, 44 reclose, subsequent to their initial opening.

The movement of float 98 (for automatic shutoff) has been described as resulting from the impact of the liquid on the lower end of this float, this impact being produced mainly by the action of the vacuum pump 95. It is pointed out, however,

that the automatic shutoff means of the invention will function in the desired manner even if, for some reason, the vacuum pump 95 is not operating. The float 98 is designed to float in gasoline, so that when the liquid enters tube 4 by way of passages 8 and hub 6 and rises in this central tube (as a result of the liquid level being sufficiently high in the fillpipe 42), float 98 rises due to its natural buoyancy, pushing plug member 46 and wire end 49 upwardly (by means of rod 97) and thus breaking the electrical connection between lead 50 and pin 44. This causes deenergization of relay 85 and termination of the actual dispensing operation, in the manner previously described.

Another fonn of dispensing nozzle, generally similar to the nozzle previously described but utilizing a different type of automatic shutoff means, will now be described. In this other form or embodiment of the invention, elements the same as those previously described are denoted by the same reference numerals, while similar elements are denoted by the same reference numerals but carrying prime designations. Referring now to FIGS. 7-8, an elongated chambered cast body or housing 1' has a more or less triangular outer configuration at its upper end (see FIG. 7) and a cylindrical outer configuration at its lower end. The lower (cylindrical) end of housing I is flared outwardly, resulting in an upwardly facing external annular ledge or shoulder 40 at the upper end of the flared portion, and also in a downwardly facing internal annular ledge or shoulder 99 on the inside of the flared portion. A generally cylindrical sleeve 100 of electrical insulating material, whose upper end engages the shoulder 99, is rigidly mechanically secured in the flared lower end of housing I.

Within sleeve 100 there is secured the upper end ofa tubular metallic snout 2' which has the same ID. as does the cylindrical lower end of housing 1. The joint between items 1, 100, and 2' is rigid mechanically and is leakproof, but the snout 2' is electrically insulated from housing 1' by means of the sleeve 100. The lower end of snout 2' is generally curved or bent in one plane, similarly to snout 2 previously described, so that it can be inserted readily into the tillpipe ofa fuel tank. The upper end of metallic tip member 3 is sealingly secured to the lower end of snout 2'.

A metallic central tube 4, having a curvature matching that of snout 2', is mounted concentrically within this snout, the upper end of this tube extending approximately through one corner of the substantially triangular upper portion of housing 1' (see FIG. 7). The annular region or space 5 between snout 2' and the tube 4 provides a flow channel for fuel (gasoline) proceeding downwardly from the lower end of housing 1' through snout 2. The construction at the lower end of the nozzle of FIGS. 7-8, including the integral hollow hub 6, spokes 7, the passages 8, and the somewhat triangular areas 9 (which areas are not visible in ,FIG. 8), is exactly the same as that previously described in connection with FIGS. 1-3. The annular space 5 and the four triangular areas between the spokes 7 together provide a flow channel for the liquid fuel downwardly through the nozzle of FIGS. 7B, while the passages 8, the interior of hub 6, and the central tube 4 provide a path for air and vapor upwardly through the nozzle.

The lower cylindrical end of housing I (to which the upper end of snout 2' is insulatingly secured) is open (i.e., tubular, and helps to provide the upper end of annular space 5. The upper substantially triangular end of the funnel-shaped housing 1' as cast is closed, but this end wall is drilled to provide therein three apertures or openings 13, I9, and 25 which are located approximately atthe respective corners of the triangle (see FIG. 7). The outer ends of the three hoses of a triple-conduit hose combination are coupled to respective ones of the three openings just referred to. The hose combination may be quite similar to the hose combination I0 previously described, but only two individual hoses or conduits l7 and 23' are visible in FIG. 8.

A liquid fuel hose 17 of the hose combination is secured to the metallic hose coupling I8 in the same manner as previously described in connection with FIG. 1. During fuel dispensing, gasoline may flow through hose 17 in the direction of the arrow labeled "Gasoline.

It is pointed out that a liquid fuel hose similar to hose 11 (FIG. 1) is secured as in FIG. 1 to a coupling mounted in housing aperture 13. During fuel dispensing, gasoline may flow through this latter hose in the direction toward the snout 2' and the tip member 3.

It will be recalled that the lower end of tube 4 is secured and metallically connected to the hub 6, which is integral with tip member 3; tip member 3 is metallically connected to snout 2'. The outer cylindrical walls of snout 2' and tip member 3 pro vide an external metallic surface which is electrically insulated at I00 from the main housing 1'. The outer wall of the cylindrical lower end portion of housing I, in the vicinity of shoulder 40, provides another external metallic surface which is spaced above the surface provided by snout 2' and tip 3.

A two-part sleeve 10] of electrical insulating material, the two parts of which are separated by a gap in which is positioned an O-ring 26, is mounted in housing aperture 25. The upper end of tube 4 passes through the insulating sleeve 10! and is thereby electrically insulated from housing 1'. The O- ring I6 engages the wall of housing opening 25, and also engages the outer wall of tube 4, thereby to seal this tube into and through the upper end of housing I. O-ring 26 is made of an electrical insulating material.

The central hose 23 of the triple-conduit hose combination, during dispensing, normally carries vapor plus air in the direction of the arrow so Iegended. Hose 23' is secured in any well-known manner to the upper end of tube 4, which end extends outwardly beyond the housing 1.

The bores of couplings l2 and 18 are separated from each other, but the lower or inner ends of both bores (when such bore ends are open) communicate with a common chamber [02 inside of housing 1'; this chamber opens in turn into the upper end of the annular space 5. Thus, the fluid fuel (gasoline) being carried by the coupling 18 (and its associated hose) may mix in chamber 102 with the fluid fuel (gasoline) being carried by the coupling 12 (and its associated hose). Therefore, fluids carried by either or both of the two fuel hoses may flow to annular space 5. When the inner ends of couplings 12 and I8 are open, the liquid fuel being carried by one hose such as I7 will mix or blend with the liquid fuel being carried by the other hose, in chamber 102, and the blended liquid will enter the annular space 5 and will flow downwardly through this space or region and out the lower or discharge end of the nozzle.

An antidrain" valve is provided for each of the fuel hoses (i.e., for each of the couplings I2 and 18). These valves are rather similar in construction, and exactly similar in operation, to the antidrain" valves previously described in connection with FIG. 1. In the embodiment of FIGS. 7-8, however, each of the two sealing discs (for example, disc 30) is attached to a respective supporting member 103 having an integral shank portion mounted for longitudinal sliding movement in a bore 104 formed in an internal boss 105 in the housing casting l. The spring 32 surrounds and is guided by the boss 105; one end of this spring bears against the shoulder 106 provided at the base of boss 105 and the opposite end of this spring bears against the head of member I03.

The nozzle of FIGS. 78 would preferably have a suitable molded rubber sleeve (not shown) over the ends of hoses I7, 23', near the upper end of the housing casting I. This sleeve would serve as a handle.

The nozzle of FIGS. 7-8, like that of FIGS. I-6 previously described, is particularly applicable to dispensing apparatus of the type wherein a number of "grades of gasoline may be dispensed selectively from a single apparatus. Coupling l8 (and its associated gasoline hose 17) would be coupled to the discharge side of a pump for one blending component of a certain octane rating, and coupling 12 (and its associated gasoline hose 1]) would be coupled to the discharge side of another pump for the other blending component, of a different octane rating.

Again, the nozzle of FIGS. 7-8 provides a control means which permits the liquid fuel dispensing pumps to he energized only when such nozzle is properly inserted into the fillpipe of an automobile fuel tank, thus providing a safety feature desirable for self-service use. Such control means will now be described.

As previously described, the nozzle of FIGS. 7-8 is provided with two spaced external metallic surfaces which are electrically insulated from each other, one surface comprising the outer cylindrical walls of snout 2' and tip member 3, and the other surface comprising the outer wall of housing I, e.g. in the vicinity of shoulder 40.

Refer now to FIG. 9. When the dispensing nozzle of FIGS. 7-8 is inserted into the metallic i'tllpipe 42 of an automobile fuel tank for dispensing purposes, it necessarily must contact such fillpipe at at least two spaced points, one of these ordinarily being on the metallic tip member 3 or on the metallic snout 2', at or near the lower end of the nozzle. For proper insertion of the nozzle (to effectuate dispensing) the other of these two points must be located on the metallic housing 1', in the vicinity of shoulder 40, the shoulder 40 on housing I being provided for engagement under the downwardly facing shoulder 43 on the fillpipe 42, as illustrated in FIG. 9.

The enlarged, substantially triangular cross section of housing 1 (shown in FIG. 7) prevents the nozzle from being inserted into the fillpipe 42 too far, which could interfere with the proper dispensing of gasoline into the automobile fuel tank.

When the nozzle of FIGS. 7-8 is properly inserted into the fillpipe 42, an electrically conducting path is provided, by the metallic fillpipe, between the lower metallic portion of the nozzle and the housing 1'. This completes an electrical circuit which enables the fuel pumps to be energized, as will later be described. Unless the nozzle is properly inserted in the fillpipe in this manner (so that contact is made with the fillpipe at two spaced points, one of which is on housing 1' and the other of which is on the lower metallic end portion, i.e. snout 2' or member 3, of the nozzle), the fuel pumps cannot be energized.

As previously described, the central metallic tube 4 of the FIG. 8 nozzle is directly and metallically connected at its lower end to tip member 3 and snout 2'. An electrical connection, insulated from ground," extends from this tube into the interior of apparatus housing 58'. The hose 23' has a conventional metallic braid or metallic spring 107 therein, the metallic element 107 being located at the bore of this hose and being used mainly for mechanical strengthening or reinforcing purposes. The outer or lower end of hose 23' is fitted over the outer end of tube 4 in such a way that the metallic element 107 is metallically connected to tube 4. The hose 23' passes into the interior of housing 58 in such a manner that element 107 is insulated therefrom. In FIG. 9, the braid or spring 107 is for convenience represented by a dotted line extending from housing I along the center line of hose 23' into the housing 58.

A grounding electrical connection is provided between the fillpipe 42 and the metallic apparatus housing 58', as will now be described. The housing 1, which when in dispensing position contacts the fillpipe, is metallically connected to the pipe couplings l2 and 18. One or both of these latter couplings are metallically connected to the metallic braids or metallic springs 59 provided in each of the hoses II and 17. The inner or upper ends of the springs are electrically connected as at 60 to the grounded housing 58'.

The apparatus contained in housing 58' is generally similar to that contained in the housing 58 (FIG. 6), previously described.

As previously described, the outer or nozzle end of metallic element 107 (braid or spring) is connected to tube 4, and thus to snout 2' and tip element 3. The inner end of element 107 (inside housing 58') is connected to one of the two single-pole contacts associated with each of a plurality of parallel-connected pushbuttons 83 each operating a pair of single-pole contacts. The other contacts associated with pushbuttons 83 are paralleled and connected through a pair of series contacts in a vacuum switch 108 (to be later described in more detail) to one end of a relay-operating coil 84; the other end of coil 84 is connected to the ungrounded terminal of source 81.

The vacuum switch 108 operates to provide an automatic shutoff in a manner to be later described, and its contacts are normally closed except when the motor vehicle fuel tank is full; for the present, it will be assumed that these contacts are closed.

When any one of the pushbuttons 83 is depressed sufficiently to close its (normally open) single-pole contacts, a circuit is completed from the ungrounded terminal of source 81 to snout 2' and tip member 3, through relay coil 84, the (assumed closed) contacts of switch 108, the closed contacts of the pushbutton 83 which has been depressed, metallic element 107, and tube 4. If at this time the nozzle is properly positioned in fillpipe 42, a circuit is completed from tip member 3 and/or snout 2' through the fillpipe to ground, by way of housing 1', hose spring 59, and ground connection 60. The completion of the above-described circuit causes energization of relay coil 84, to operate relay 85.

The operation of relay 85 moves the dual proportioning valve 75, 76 to on" and energizes the pump motors 62 and 70, causing dispensing of the gasoline to begin, as previously described in connection with FIG. 6. It may be observed that both of the spaced, electrically insulated metallic surfaces on the FIG. 8 nozzle are connected in a series circuit with relay coil 84, so that this coil cannot be energized unless both the lower metallic portion (tip member 3, and/or snout 2') of the nozzle and the housing 1' are in contact with the metallic fillpipe 42.

An automatic shutoff means, different from the type previ ously described in connection with FIG. 3, is illustrated in conjunction with the nozzle of FIGS. 7-8. The automatic shutoff means new to be described, like the one described previously, automatically stops the dispensing of fuel when the motor vehicle fuel tank is full.

As previously described, the outer end of the hose 23' is connected, at the nozzle, to the upper end of tube 4. The inner end of this hose is connected, inside housing 58', to the suction side of a vacuum pump 95, by way of the two "straight through" legs of a T-fitting 109. The other side of vacuum pump is connected via a pipe 96 to a suitable vapor disposal/recovery system. The pump 95 is arranged to be activated at the same time as pumps 61 and 68, as previously described in connection with FIG. 6; pump 95 is deactivated at the same time as pumps 61 and 68. During dispensing, vacuum pump 95 draws air and vapor out of the vapor space (above the liquid) in the automobile fuel tank by way of the passages 8, tube 4, and hose 23.

From the side leg of tee 109, a pipe or hose extends to the vacuum switch 108, the detailed construction of which is illustrated in FIG. 10. The end of pipe or hose 110 opposite to fitting 109 is sealed into one end of a lower passage 111 in the chambered body 112 of vacuum switch 108, and the other end of passage 111 communicates by way of an opening 113 with the lower face of a piston 114 mounted for vertical movement within body 112 by means of a flexible diaphragm 115 which is sealed to the upper face of the piston and fixed at its outer periphery to the outer wall of body I12. The outer periphery of diaphragm 115 is secured in position (as by means of bolts, not shown) which extend through a domed cover 116 having an enlarged aperture 117 therein. Thus, the pressure in the vapor hose 23, as affected by the vacuum pump 95, is applied to the lower face of piston 114, while atmospheric pressure is effective on the upper face of this piston.

A coiled compression spring 118, positioned within opening 113, is arranged to bias the piston I14 upwardly. The lower end of spring lI8 engages a plurality of spaced lugs 119 which are formed in body 112, at opening 113, and the upper end of this spring engages the lower face of piston 114.

A plunger 120, made of electrical insulating material and having an integral collar I21 thereon, is fixedly secured to piston 114 for movement therewith; the upper end of this plunger extends slidably through a central aperture provided in cover 116. The collar 121 is arranged to cooperate with the inner ends of a pair of vertically spaced spring contacts 122 and I23 the outer ends of which are insulatingly mounted on the top of cover I16 by means of an insulating block 124, and which pass radially inwardly through aperture II7 toward plunger 120. The spring contacts 122 and 123 are separated from each other over most of their lengths by means of a rather rigid block 125 of insulating material which is attached to the outer ends only of the spring contacts, by means of the bolts (not shown) which pass downwardly through block 124, the outer ends of contacts 122 and 123, cover 116, and diaphragm 115, into the cylindrical body 112. However, at their inner ends the contacts 122 and I23 carry unnumbered buttons which are adapted to come into engagement with each other to complete a circuit between contacts I22 and 123.

An electrical lead 126 is connected to contact I22, and an electrical lead 127 is connected to contact I23. As shown in FIG. 9, lead 126 may connect to one set of fixed contacts of the pushbutton array 83, and lead 127 may connect to the end of relay coil 84 opposite to source 8].

In FIG. 10, the piston 114 is illustrated in midstroke, it being assumed to be held in this position by some force (as later described). In this position, the contacts 122 and 123 are in engagement. If this force is released, spring 118 pushes piston I14 upward, and collar I21 pushes contact 122 upward. Since the central insulator I prevents contact 123 from moving upward, the contacts 122 and 123 of switch 108 open. If a moderate vacuum exists on the lower face of piston 114 (by virtue of vacuum pump 95, acting through the pipe or hose 110), the piston is pulled downwardly against the bias of spring 118, and contacts I22 and 123 are closed, as illustrated in FEG. I0. If a high vacuum exists in the chamber below piston 114, the piston is pulled further downwardly, so that collar 121 then pushes the contact 123 downward, breaking or opening the contacts 122 and 123 of switch 108.

As disclosed in my above-identified copending application, the gasoline dispensing mechanism within housing 58' includes a cam, driven by the reset motor of the mechanism, which pushes downwardly on the plunger I20, as indicated by the legend in FIG. 10.

The operation of the FIGS. 7 I0 embodiment is somewhat similar to that previously described, as to the pushbuttons 83, the valve 75, 76, the pump motors 62 and 70, and the "antidrain" valves and 30'. In operation, the cam referred to initially holds the switch I08 in the "closed" position illustrated, which (assuming that the nozzle has been properly inserted into fillpipe 42, and that one of the pushbuttons 83 has been depressed) results in the operation of relay 85, starting the dispenser including the vacuum pump 95. The cam holds switch 108 in this closed position until the dispenser is started and the vacuum pump 95 is running, and then this cam releases the switch (i.e., removes from the switch the downwardly directed force which was acting on plunger 120 If the vacuum pump 95 is defective, such that it produces no or insufficient vacuum on the lower face of piston 114, the piston 114 is now pushed upwardly by spring 118, opening the contacts 122 and I23; since these contacts are in series with the relay coil 84, the relay 85 is deenergized in this case, shutting off the dispenser (by turning off motors 62 and 70, and closing valve 75, 76). This provides a safety feature.

If the vacuum pump 95 is operating properly, the friction of the orifices 8 in the nozzle is sufficient to cause a pressure drop therethrough, resulting in a moderate vacuum on the lower face of piston II, which causes this piston to be held in the center position illustrated. This keeps the contacts I22 and 123 closed, enabling dispensing to take place (relay 85 being held energized).

When the level of liquid in the fuel tank rises sufficiently, some ofthe liquid fuel will enter one or more of the nozzle orifices 8. When liquid contacts these nozzle orifices, the pres sure drop therethrough rises sharply, resulting in the production of a higher vacuum (i.e., lower pressure) below piston 114; in this case, atmospheric pressure on the upper face of this piston forces it down, breaking or opening the contacts 122 and 123. When the contacts of switch 108 thus open, the energization circuit for relay is broken, resulting in the opening of the relay contacts and the consequent cutting off of the flow of gasoline (that is, the cessation of dispensing) in the same way as previously explained in connection with FIG. 6. This provides an automatic shutoff action. The vacuum pump is deactivated at this time, along with the other components of the dispensing apparatus.

When the dispensing apparatus has shut down in the manner just described, removing the vacuum from the lower side of piston 114, this piston and the plunger are returned upwardly by spring I18, reclosing the contacts 122 and 123 momentarily on the way, However, this momentary reclosing does not affect the operation, since a momentary opening of the switch 108 is sufficient to shut down the dispenser permanently (as described previously in connection with FIG. 6, due to the release of the depressed pushbutton in array 83 upon the deenergization of solenoid 90). As the reset motor of the mechanism operates, the cam driven thereby again pushes downwardly on plunger 120 to bring switch I08 into the closed" position illustrated, so that the next dispensing cycle can start. This is explained more fully in my above-identified copending application.

In the foregoing description, the nozzles of this invention have been described in connection with a triple-conduit hose combination, wherein two conduits or hoses are used for fuel (in a "multigrade" or "blending" type of gasoline dispenser), and the third as an air and vapor line. However, it is desired to be pointed out that they are equally applicable to a onegrade" type of gasoline dispenser, using only a double-conduit hose combination, one hose for fuel and the other as an air and vapor line. In a one-grade" gasoline dispenser, the nozzles would operate in exactly the same fashion as previously described, to prevent operation of the dispensing pump unless the nozzles are properly inserted into the fillpipe, and to pro vide automatic shutoff action in response to a full condition of the fuel tank.

It is desired to be pointed out that the nozzles of the invention are completely fail-safe," since energization circuits must be closed in order to activate the pumps and start the dispensing. If anything breaks, such as the hose, or if any of the power sources fail, etc., the energization circuits are opened, which results in the shutting off of the pump motors 62 and 70 and the termination of the dispensing. Also, it may be seen that if the nozzles of the invention accidentally fall out of the fillpipe during a dispensing operation, the series energization circuit for relay coil 84 is no longer completed through the fillpipe; this deenergizes relay 85 and stops the liquid fuel pumps, as well as "closing" the valve 75, 76.

lclaim:

1. In combination, a liquid fuel pump, an electrical energization circuit for said pump, a dispensing nozzle receptive of fuel from said pump and adapted to be inserted for dispensing purposes into the metallic fillpipe of a fuel tank, means provid ing a pair of spaced external metallic surfaces, electrically insulated from each other, on said nozzle, said surfaces being arranged to both come into direct ohmic contact with said fillpipe when said nozzle is inserted thereinto, thereby to electrically connect said surfaces together through said fillpipe; and means connecting said surfaces electrically in series in said pump energization circuit, thereby to permit or prevent energization of said pump according to whether said nozzle is or is not inserted in the fuel tank fillpipe.

2. Combination according to claim I, wherein one of said surfaces comprises the outer face of a sleeve surrounding the exterior of said nozzle.

3. Combination according to claim 1, wherein each of said surfaces comprises a respective portion of the outer wall of said nozzle.

4. In combination, a liquid fuel pump. an electrical energization circuit for said pump, a dispensing nozzle receptive of fuel from said pump and adapted to be inserted for dispensing purposes into the fillpipe of a fuel tank, a conduit in said nozzle for conveying gases in a direction opposite to the direction of fuel flow through said nozzle, said conduit communicating with the exterior of said nozzle adjacent the dispensing end thereof; means coupled to said conduit for establishing a subatmospheric pressure therein, a pair of electrical contacts adapted to cooperate with each other, means providing a pair of spaced external metallic surfaces, electrically insulated from each other, on said nozzle, said surfaces being arranged to both come into direct ohmic contact with a metallic fillpipe into which said nozzle is inserted, thereby to electrically connect said surfaces together through said fillpipe; means connecting said surfaces electrically in series with said contacts means connecting said contacts electrically in series with said contacts, means connecting said contacts electrically in series in said pump energization circuit, and means responsive to a pressure change in said conduit for actuating said contacts.

5. Combination according to claim 4, wherein one of said surfaces comprises a portion of the outer wall of said nozzle.

6. Combination according to claim 4, wherein one of said surfaces comprises the main body portion of said nozzle.

7. Combination according to claim 6, wherein the other of said surfaces comprises a portion of the outer wall of said nozzle.

Patent Citations
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GB1057493A * Title not available
Referenced by
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US3866637 *Feb 2, 1973Feb 18, 1975Emco LtdFluidic automatic nozzle
US3877498 *Jan 15, 1973Apr 15, 1975Volucompteurs Aster BoutillonNozzles of fluid dispensing valves of the automatic shutoff type
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/192, 141/198, 141/382, 141/352
International ClassificationF16K21/00, B67D7/74, B67D7/52, B67D7/54, B67D7/04
Cooperative ClassificationF16K21/00, B67D7/54, B67D7/3236, B67D7/048, B67D7/52
European ClassificationB67D7/32E, F16K21/00, B67D7/52, B67D7/54, B67D7/04C1B