Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3591144 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1971
Filing dateFeb 9, 1970
Priority dateFeb 10, 1969
Publication numberUS 3591144 A, US 3591144A, US-A-3591144, US3591144 A, US3591144A
InventorsIving Stig Bertil
Original AssigneeIving Stig Bertil
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shock-absorbing coverings
US 3591144 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] lnventor Stig Berti] lvlng Limhamnsvagen 18A, 217 59, Malmo, Sweden [21] App1.No. 9,522 [22] Filed Feb. 9, 1970 [45] Patented July 6, 1971 [32] Priority 7 Feb. 10,1969 [33] Sweden [31] 1749/69 [54] SHOCK-"ABSORBING COVERINGS 6 Claims, 2 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 256/l3.1, 94/ 1.5

[51] lnt.Cl E01! 15/00 [50] Field olSearch ..256/1, 13.1,

[ 56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,153,384 4/1939 Mazza 273/55 R Primary Examiner-Dennis L. Taylor An0meys- Ralph E. Bucknam, Jesse D. Reingold, Robert R.

Strack and Henry A. Marzullo, Jr.

ABSTRACT: A covering for objects that are exposed to impacts, such as road and bridge parapets, guiding curbs, motorcar bumpers, central reserve guard rails for expressways etc. The covering comprises a jacket of resilient material with a hollow space therein in which a damping material, preferably sand, is enclosed. The hollow space has a volume greater than the damping material, whereby the latter can expand when the covering is exposed to an impact.

PATENTEDJUL 612mv 359 1 144 sum 1 or 2 FIG.I

snocx-Aasoaanso covaamcs 1- In recent years, traffic safety research has devoted an ever increasing interest to the function of shock-'absorbingdevices, particularly bridge parapets and road guard rails for highways and expressways, but also motorcar bumpers. lt hasbeen.

- gers.

the raildoes not have any parts that can penetrate into the motorcar, therebycausing injury to the driver and the passen- [As will appear from FIG. 1, the covering 12 can have onits upper side a particular casing 23 which can eitherbe formed inonepiece with the envelope 13 or be an individual part secured thereto. The casing 23 accommodates lamps 24 and conductors 25 which may also be placed in a tubular conduit at the point designated 26 in" the interior of the envelope 13. With this arrangement of the lamps 24 it is possible to provide directional light for the roadway, 01' Warning light that can be lit on either side of a scene of accident. Serving as directional 4 light,'the lamps 24 can easily be switched on and off automatidriver and passengers. If the 'impact of vehicles against the guard rail could be damped the injuries suffered in the collision could be further reduced.

The present invention has for its object to provide a shockabsorbing structure of this type, which is realized by means of a covering for the parapet, guard,.rail etc.-,' said covering comprising a jacket or envelope of suitable resilient material, such as polyethylene, and a damping material, preferably sand,

predominantly fillingout said jacket or envelope.

The invention will be morefully described in the following,

reference being had to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical section of a shock-absorbing covering according to the invention; v

FIG. 2 is a horizontal section of the covering in FlG. l. The illustrated shock-absorbing covering according to the invention is mounted on a guard rail of the type' which is placed between the roadways of an expressway. The guard rail comprises vertical uprights l0, preferablyof-the profile shown in FIG. 2, which are secured in the ground. A U-shaped beam 11 is secured to'the upper ends of the uprights 10 to extend between them. The beam 11 is connected to the uprights preferably by screws. A shock-absorbing covering generally designated 12 is placed on the guard rail which is composed of the parts 10 and 11. The covering 12 is a jacket or envelope ll! of polyethylene or some othcr suitable plastics material. The envelope l3 is approximately square and has a recess 14 which opens at the underside of the envelope and has a depth exceeding half the height of the envelope, and a width corresponding to that of the parts 10 and 11. At the sides facing the two roadways the envelope 13 has bumper ribs 15. The envelope contains a filling of sand 16. The sand'l6 does not fill out the envelope l3 entirely, but leaves an expansion space 17 above the sand. The envelope 13 is preferably-manufactured by injection molding in lengths of about 5 meters. The sand is filled into the envelope through holes therein, which are then closed by welding.

The covering 12 is mounted on the rail 10, 11 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1. For additionally supporting the envelope on the rail a beam 18 is provided. It is connected to the uprights 10 in the same manner as the beam 11 and has two channels 19, 20 in which to receive flanges 21 and 22, respectively, projecting from the envelope 13 on either side of the recess 14. The covering can be secured to the rail 10, 11 in any desired manner whatever. it is preferably mounted by clamping action on the rail or is shrunk thereonto, whereby a certain mobility is attained relative to the rail. It is also possible to secure the covering by adhesive bonding or by screwing. It is essential that the covering is simple to mount at the site and that damaged parts are easily exchangeable. I

The height of the mil with the covering mounted in position thereon is preferably about i meter, and the total width of the covering may be of the size of e.g. 0.5 meter.

When a motorcar collides with the described rail and the covering thereon those parts of the motorcar most suited to absorb impacts will hit the rail. The impact will be damped by reason-of the sand filling expanding in the envelope l3 and also by reason of the possible displacement of the covering 12 longitudinally of the rail. A further important feature is that cally so that a motorcar itself can switch on lamps 'l or 2 kilometers ahead of the motorcar, whereupon these lamps are extinguished after a given period of time. It is also. possible to switch on the lamps from a central point and to have the lampsblink in a certain section if an accident has happenedin this section.

As already mentioned the illustrated embodiment of the covering is meant to be placed. on a rail between the roadways of an expressway, but it is self-explanatory that the covering can readily be adapted for. mounting on bridge parapets'and like guard structures. In that case, only half the envelope l3 illustrated in FIG. 1 need be used and said envelope can have its top provided with a hook-shaped portion with or without sand filling, which is placed about the upper beam of the bridge parapet, while the envelope. at the bottom has a flange corresponding to flange 22 and received in a supporting rail in the same manner as said flange '22. A covering for a bridge parapet can also suitably have a flange'22'both at the top and atthe bottom and be secured by means of two spaced U- shaped means which are secured to the bridge parapet with facing openings. The covering mayof course also be placed on vehicles, particularly onthe bumpers thereof or in such a way as to fonn a complete vehicle front.

lclaim: I. In a road guard rail structure composed of longitudinal beams parallel to the roadway and vertical uprights supporting said beams, ane'nvelope, a hollow space in said envelope, a recess in one side of the envelope for receiving the beams, a

damping material, and flanges projecting on either side of the recess in the envelope, said damping material being disposed in said hollow space and having a volume smaller than said hollow space, said recess having a depth exceeding half the height of the envelope, and said flanges on either side of the recess being connected with the road guard rail structure.

'2. A road guard rail structure as claimed in claim 2, wherein said envelope is composed of successive individual sections which are restrictedly movable relative to said beams.

3. A-road guard rail structure as claimed in claim 2, wherein channels are secured between the vertical uprights with upwardly facing mouths for receiving said flanges.

4. In a road guard rail structure composed of longitudinal beams parallel to the roadway and vertical uprights supporting said beams, an envelope, a hollow space in said envelope, a recess in one side of the envelope for receiving the beams, a damping material, and flanges projecting on either side of the recess in the envelope, a casing on the envelope, lighting means on the casing, and means for supplying electric power to the lighting means to cause them to be lit, said damping material being disposed in the hollow space and having a volume smaller than said hollow space, said recess having a depth exceeding half the height of the envelope, and receiving means attached to and extending between the uprights and adapted to receive said flanges.

5. A road guard rail structure as claimed in claim 4, wherein the envelope is of polyethylene and said damping material is sand.

6. A road guard rail structure as claimed in claim 4, wherein said envelope is composed of successive individual sections which are restrictedly movable relative to said beams.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2153384 *Oct 21, 1937Apr 4, 1939Joseph MazzaFootball practice device
US2631014 *Sep 27, 1950Mar 10, 1953O'neale Malcolm LGuard rail
US2793900 *Aug 27, 1951May 28, 1957Marshall Mary VNoiseless motor vehicle bumper cover
US3019758 *Oct 26, 1959Feb 6, 1962Nat Lock CoSelf-locking gunnel bumpers
US3141655 *Dec 5, 1961Jul 21, 1964Fletcher N PlattEnergy absorbing device
US3288440 *Aug 13, 1964Nov 29, 1966Hendrikus Laurens MariaHighway guard
US3493257 *Mar 22, 1967Feb 3, 1970Gen Motors CorpResilient microcellular foam bumper
US3494607 *Oct 2, 1967Feb 10, 1970Ford Motor CoImpact energy absorbing fluid cushion structure
GB1189669A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3963218 *Jun 26, 1973Jun 15, 1976Acieries Reunies De Burbach-Eich-Dudelange S.A. ArbedVehicle guardrail with metal core
US3982735 *Nov 21, 1973Sep 28, 1976Fornells Gilbert PDismantable and directable rail or balustrade
US4040759 *Sep 1, 1976Aug 9, 1977Olaf Narten SkalleWarning, marking and/or barrier arrangement
US4249832 *Dec 13, 1978Feb 10, 1981High Performance Composites, Inc.Highway median delineator
US4289419 *Oct 1, 1979Sep 15, 1981Energy Absorption Systems, Inc.Inertial barrier system
US4406563 *Mar 30, 1981Sep 27, 1983Urlberger Hermann HansProtective barrier provided with at least one longitudinal side bar
US4496264 *Apr 1, 1982Jan 29, 1985Casey Steven MBarrier structure
US4535974 *Apr 12, 1984Aug 20, 1985Henry CondeImpact absorbing parking space barrier
US4553875 *Oct 31, 1983Nov 19, 1985Casey Steven MMethod for making barrier structure
US4986694 *Jun 12, 1989Jan 22, 1991Delamere Peter AMarker for concrete barriers
US5306106 *Aug 14, 1992Apr 26, 1994Robert MiletiImpact attenuator
US5560732 *Feb 10, 1994Oct 1, 1996Traffix DevicesSafety delineators
US5749673 *Jul 18, 1995May 12, 1998Traffix DevicesStackable vertical panel
US5899628 *Aug 24, 1998May 4, 1999Pei-Chi; ChangRoad anti-dazzle device
US6095716 *Aug 22, 1997Aug 1, 2000Traffix Devices, Inc.Stackable vertical panel
US6168346Jul 14, 1998Jan 2, 2001Ronald E. ErnsbergerSpacer for supporting a guard rail on a post
US6186699Feb 26, 1999Feb 13, 2001Traffix Devices, Inc.Easily stackable safety delineators
US6305312Jun 9, 1999Oct 23, 2001Bent Manufacturing CompanyStackable vertical panel traffic channelizing device
US6520712Mar 18, 2002Feb 18, 2003Traffix Devices, Inc.Safety delineators which easily stack
US6530560Feb 20, 2002Mar 11, 2003K.E.S.S. Inc.Guardrail support, attachment, and positioning block
US6536369Aug 18, 2000Mar 25, 2003Bent Manufacturing CompanyHandle for traffic delineator
US6758627Nov 15, 2001Jul 6, 2004K.E.S.S. Inc.Guard rail support, attachment, and positioning spacer block
US7168882 *Sep 14, 2005Jan 30, 2007A. W. OwenRoad barrier
US7322714 *Jun 8, 2005Jan 29, 2008Snapedge Canada Ltd.Decorative light and landscape lighting system
US7478796Jun 10, 2005Jan 20, 2009Monroeville Industrial Moldings, Inc.Guardrail support members
US7543369Jun 16, 2008Jun 9, 2009Monroeville Industrial Moldings, Inc.Guardrail support members
US7559535 *Oct 31, 2007Jul 14, 2009K.E.S.S. Inc.Guardrail support, attachment, and positioning block
US7798473 *Jun 26, 2007Sep 21, 2010K.E.S.S., Inc.Guardrail support, attachment, and positioning block
US7832713Feb 14, 2008Nov 16, 2010K.E.S.S. Inc.Guard rail mounting block and guard rail system incorporating the same
US7901156 *Jan 6, 2010Mar 8, 2011Mccue CorporationBollard having an impact absorption mechanism
US8267262 *Apr 18, 2005Sep 18, 2012Rack Armour LimitedPallet rack impact protector
US8317162 *May 20, 2009Nov 27, 2012Ab VarmforzinkningRoad rail
US9598827 *Aug 20, 2016Mar 21, 2017Victor Nicholas Pavloff, Jr.Barrier rail retrofit device assembly
US20040079931 *Feb 12, 2003Apr 29, 2004Climente Jose Enrique De La PuertaVehicle containment barrier
US20040197140 *Apr 1, 2004Oct 7, 2004Matthew MaleskaAttachable traffic barrier amenities
US20050047861 *Jul 26, 2004Mar 3, 2005Climente Jose Enrique De La PuertaVehicle containment barrier
US20050274939 *Jun 10, 2005Dec 15, 2005Monroeville Industrial Moldings, Inc.Guardrail support members
US20060277823 *Jun 8, 2005Dec 14, 2006Snapedge Canada. Ltd.Decorative light and landscape lighting system
US20070170137 *Apr 18, 2005Jul 26, 2007Rack Armour LimitedPallet rack impact protector
US20080069637 *May 19, 2006Mar 20, 2008Max D. MizeBarrier system and method
US20080149906 *Oct 31, 2007Jun 26, 2008King David TGuardrail support, attachment, and positioning block
US20080245939 *Jun 16, 2008Oct 9, 2008Monroeville Industrial Moldings, Inc.Guardrail support members
US20080265231 *Feb 14, 2008Oct 30, 2008King David TGuard rail mounting block and guard rail system incorporating the same
US20080290334 *Jun 26, 2007Nov 27, 2008K.E.S.S., Inc.Guardrail support, attachment, and positioning block
US20100172692 *Jan 6, 2010Jul 8, 2010Mccue CorporationBollard having an impact absorption mechanism
US20110155981 *May 20, 2009Jun 30, 2011Ab VarmforzinkningRoad rail
US20140334875 *May 13, 2014Nov 13, 2014Scott A. HoffmanJersey Barrier Improvements
CN103321163A *Jun 28, 2013Sep 25, 2013浙江宏博新型建材有限公司Outer wing of highway fence
CN103321163B *Jun 28, 2013Jan 27, 2016浙江宏博新型建材有限公司一种高速护栏的外翅
EP0297182A1 *Jul 1, 1987Jan 4, 1989Energy Absorption Systems, Inc.Energy absorbing barrier
WO1993012300A1 *Dec 10, 1991Jun 24, 1993'societe Commerciale Filtray's'Traffic divider and traffic dividing system using same
WO2013162483A1 *Sep 12, 2012Oct 31, 2013Tekin Ve Emir Yatirim Insaat Limited SirketiAbacus barrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/6, 256/13.1, 404/10
International ClassificationE01F9/011, E01F15/04, E01F15/02, E01F9/03
Cooperative ClassificationE01F15/0453, E01F9/03
European ClassificationE01F15/04F, E01F9/03