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Publication numberUS3591204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1971
Filing dateMay 7, 1968
Priority dateMay 7, 1968
Publication numberUS 3591204 A, US 3591204A, US-A-3591204, US3591204 A, US3591204A
InventorsKelly V Shipes
Original AssigneeFmc Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underwater flow line connector system
US 3591204 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Kelly V. Shipes lloustomTex. 1211 Appl, No. 727,l90 22 Filed May 7,1968 [45] Patented July 6, 1971 [73] Assignee FMC Corporation Sen Jose, Calif.

[54] UNDERWATER FLOW LINE CONNECTOR SYSTEM 10 Clalrns, 12 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.Cl 285/26,

285/93, 1661.6,285/315 s l mu P16139100, F161 3/08 [50] Field of Surch 285/26, 25, 24, 27,93, 315', 166/6, .5; 91/399; 116/125; 24/257 [56] References Clted UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,313,009 4/1967 Beckerer 1. 24/257 7 so 52 E 1 3,481,396 12/1969 Williams et a1. H 285/18 X 2,569,504 10/1951 Thierryuu 91/399 2,826,165 3/1958 Adelson 116/125 3,050,140 13/1962 Hayes 1 166/.6 X 3,052,299 9/1962 Geer et a1. 166/.6 3,074,670 1/1963 Bruening 166/93 X 3,222,088 12/1965 Haeber 166/18 3,241,864 3/1966 Shaffer... 166/.5 X 3,358,753 12/1967 Haeber 166/6 3,419,071 12/1968 Williams, Jr. et a1. 166/.6

Primary Examiner-Thomas F. Callaghan AnomeysF. W. Anderson and C. E. Tripp ABSTRACT: A remotely controllable, hydraulic-powered connector system for coupling and uncoupling a fluid flow line at an underwater or other remote location, particularly at the site of an underwater wellhead, including a mechanism for releasably latching the connector in place to a foundation structure at the coupling site, and a system for indicating whether or not the apparatus is in a fully coupled or uncoupled condition.

I J, 20 i? '11 Z6, 24 18 PATENTED JUL 5 I97! SHKET l U? 7 ATTORNEYS PATENIE-U JUL 5 an SHEET 2 [1F 7 I N VEN TOR. KELLY V. SHIPES ATTORNEYS PATENTEU JUL 6 ran SHEET 3 BF 7 INVIJFN'TT JR, KELLY V. SHIPES ATTORNEYS PATENTEB JUL 5m SHEET [1F 7 Q: 09 Q wON 05 E #5 Nu a. New m3 0:

V. SHIPES INVFNT JR.

ATTORNEYS UNDERWATER FLOW LINE CONNECTOR SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field ofthe Invention This invention pertains to apparatus for use in completing oil and gas wells especially at an underwater location, and more particularly to apparatus for connecting the wellhead of such a well to a conduit system for conducting fluids from the well to a storage or transportation facility. Even more specifcally, the invention relates to a remotely controllable connec tor system for coupling and uncoupling a flow line running to a wellhead positioned on the floor of a body of water.

2. Description ofthe Prior Art Several systems for connecting fluid flow lines to remote underwater wellheads are disclosed in the prior art, including some requiring the assistance of a diver and others that function without any such help. Those of the later type usually are much preferred, especially where the depth of the water is substantial, for although divers have long been used with suc cess to perform many operations involved in installing and connecting together the completion apparatus on an underwater well they can do so only in relatively shallow water and then at considerable expense. Diverless systems are, of course, remotely controlled, usually at the surface from a floating station to which the guide cables, etc., to the wellhead are attached, and for the most part entail delivering the end of the flow line to coupling position at the well connection site, such as by lowering it on a guide system or by pulling it into position with a drawline, and then activating the connector to couple the flow line to a fitting attached to the wellhead.

Some of the prior art systems for this purpose are rather sophisticated and therefore quite costly and highly subject to malfunction, for example those that involve a mechanical manipulator monitored by closed circuit television. Other systems of less exotic nature, such as those wherein the flow line is lowered to the wellhead on guide cables, are more reliable, but the slotted guide tubes or other devices by which they are aligned into coupling position are subject to obstruction by marine life, etc., and thus can fail to perform properly. Systems whereby the flow line is pulled into coupling position at the wellhead by a drawline also are prone to malfunction when foreign matter finds its way into the guidance unit, and in addition these units are relatively elaborate. Even where the flow line end is lowered vertically into a fitting on the wellhead structure and then pivoted into a reclining position, this system can be damaged or broken from excessive strain when the flow line is strung out on the floor of the ocean or the like.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The system of the present invention is designed to overcome the foregoing problems associated with the prior art systems, and includes a remotely controllable, hydraulic powered flow line connector comprising a wellhead component attached to the end ofa fluid conductor system at the Christmas tree, and a flow line component attached to the end of the flow line running from the well to a fluid storage, collecting or other facility. Being part of the well completion assembly and the flow line, respectively, these two components are individually positionable at the well, and likewise can be separately retrieved from the well, in any order. The components are fixed to separate supporting frames that are slidably mounted on guidelines strung between a surface facility, such as a floating drill platform or vessel, and the wellhead support structure or base, and automatically latch themselves into coupling position on the wellhead base when they reach it. Responding to hydraulic pressure exerted through conduits running to the surface, the components couple to establish a connection between the flow line and the well completion assembly capable of withstanding any elevated pressure that might be encountered. The invention also includes a means for determining at the surface when the connector components have positively and completely coupled or uncoupled the flow lines.

The system IS operated entirely from the surface, without any need of diver assistance, and is functionable in any water depth.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG I is a diagrammatic view in perspective of an underwater well completion apparatus with the flow line connec tor system of the present invention connecting the apparatus to a flow line leading to a storage facility or the like.

FIG. 2 is a view in side elevation and partly in section, on an enlarged scale, of the flow line connector and the adjacent wellhead base and guidance structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view in section taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2, showing the mechanism for latching the wellhead component of the connector to the wellhead base.

FIG. 4 is a view in side elevation, partially broken away, showing the latch of FIG. 3 in greater detail.

FIGS. 5 and SA when placed end to end form an enlarged section taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 2, with a portion broken away to illustrate the hydraulic system.

FIG. 6 is a view like the composite of FIGS. 5 and 5A, but on a reduced scale, showing the connectors wellhead and flow line components as they appear when latched in place on the wellhead base, but before the coupling procedure has been initiated.

FIG. 7 is a view like FIG. 6, showing the connector components following the first phase of the coupling procedure.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged portion of FIG. 7 showing the hydraulic fluid ball-check valve and the flow passage seal.

FIG. 9 is another view like FIGS. 6 and 7, showing the connector following the last phase of the coupling procedure, with the two connector components in their fully coupled condition.

FIG. 10 is a view like FIGS. 6, 7 and 9, showing the positions of the connector components after they have been uncoupled by the auxiliary uncoupler sleeve on the flow line component.

FIG. 11 is a view in perspective, on an enlarged scale, of one of the bypass rings that facilitate hydraulic fluid circulation through the system when the connector is completely coupled or uncoupled.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In reference to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. I, an underwater flow line connector [6 according to this invention is shown in fully coupled condition and latched to a wellhead base I8 that surrounds an underwater well 20. In the conventional manner a Christmas tree 22 extends upwardly from the base I8 with the lower ends of its bores connected for fluid communication to the well, such as to tubing strings 24, 26, and with the top ends of the bores in fluid communication with the flow line connector 16 via suitable conduits, for example a pair of flow line loops 2B, 30, cap 32, and extensions 34, 36 that comprise an assembly 38. Such an assembly 38 is described and claimed in copending Thuse et al. US. Pat. ap plication Ser. No. 645,357, filed June 12, 1967, and may include additional equipment as desired, such as wing valves 40, 42, and crossover valve 44 for controlling the fluid passing through the extensions 34, 36. Flow lines 46, 48 extend from the connector I6 to a fluid storage facility, or to a transportation loading facility, both of which can be located either onshore or offshore.

The flow line connector 16 comprises a wellhead component 50 and a flow line component 52. The wellhead component S0 is fixed to the extensions 34, 36, and in its preferred version forms part of the assembly 38, this assembly being held together through suitable framework and bracing (not shown) so that it can be lowered onto the Christmas tree 22 and retrieved therefrom as a unit. This is facilitated by guidelines 54 that are anchored to guideposts 56 mounted on the base structure 18, and that extend to and are held taut by a floating drilling rig or other surface facility, by guide tubes 58 rigidly attached to the wellhead component 50 by suitable supporting structure, such as struts 60, and by similar tubes and structure (not shown) likewise rigidly fixed to the rest of the assembly 38.

in like manner, the flow line component 52 is connected by suitable supporting struts 62 to a pair of guide tubes 64 that serve to guide the component 52 down the guidelines 66 onto the base 18.

Thus, in one form of the invention, after the well has been drilled, cased, and the Christmas tree 22 installed, the assembly 38 including the wellhead component 50 of the connector 16 is lowered on the guide 54 to the wellhead, and the cap 32 connected to the tree 22. The flow line component 52 is then lowered down guidelines 66 into position on the frame 18 ready for coupling to the wellhead component 50. However, it is to be understood that this procedure can be reversed, that is the flow line component 52 can be lowered to the base 18 first, and then the assembly 38 lowered into place. in like manner, the wellhead component 50 can be retrieved either before or after retrieval of the flow line component 52.

As is illustrated in more detail in FIG. 2, when the flow line connector components 50, 52 have been lowered onto the base 18, they each rest in a generally V-shaped trough 70 formed by opposed slanting side members 72 that are sup ported by struts 74 rigidly attached to the base 18. The flow line component 52 preferably is supported also at its outer end by a second troughlike structure 76 likewise rigidly mounted on the base 1t!v Therefore, when the flow line connector 16 is properly positioned on the structures 70, 76, it imposes no stress or strain on the flow lines to which it is attached.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate a latching mechanism 80 for releasably securing the wellhead component 50 to the base 18. This latching mechanism 80 comprises a stab hook 82 fixed to the lower side of the wellhead component 50, and a latch pin 84 extending through and fixed to a pair of support members 86, 88 that are pivotally mounted on the frame 18 via a pivot pin 90. The latch pin 84 is biased to the left as viewed in FIG. 4 by a spring 92 that is supported on the frame 18 by a spring adjustment stud 94 that is threaded into a bracket 96 rigidly fixed to the base 18. When the stab hook 82 contacts the latch pin 84 m the component 50 is lowered onto the base 18, the angled faces 98, 100 of the stab hook cam the latch pin to the right (FIG. 4) against the pressure of the spring 92, far enough to permit the stab hook to pass by the pin 84. The spring then forces the pin 84 to the left to latching engagement with the stab hook 82, i.e., with the pin 84 bearing against the hook face 102 and the face 104 of the shank 106.

Because of the sloping angle ofthe face 102, the exertion of sufficient upward force on the wellhead component 50 will cause this face to cam the latch pin 84 towards the spring 92, Le, to the right as viewed in FIG. 4, to the position indicated by the phantom lines, allowing the stab hook 82 to pass by the pin 84 so that the connector component 50 can be retrieved. The pressure exerted by the spring 92 on the latch pin 84, and thus the upward force that must be exerted on the connector component 50 to unlatch it from the base 18, is adjustable by rotating the stud 94, thereby moving it axially with respect to the bracket 96. A lock nut 108, or other suitable locking device, preferably is included to secure the stud 94 at the desired position.

The angles of the faces 98,100 of the stab hook 82 provide the hook with a greater mechanical advantage for compressing the spring 92 as the wellhead component 50 is lowered towards the base 18 into latched position, than that provided by the face 102 when the component 50 is lifted up ward off the base. Preferably, angles are chosen so that the force required to latch the connector component 50 to the base 18 is only 25 percent of the force required to unlatch it. However, it is to be understood that these angles can be varied to produce any latching and/or unlatching forces desired.

Once the connector components 50,52 have been lowered and latched to the base 18 in the foregoing manner, they are in alignment for coupling the flow line extensions 34,36 to the flow lines 46,48. In other words, no further pomtiomng or tl justment is required before the coupling procedure is begun, for when the connector components are resting on the troughs 70,76 they are in coaxial relationship.

As is illustrated best in FIGS. 510, the wellhead component 50 of the underwater flow line connector 16 comprises a generally elongated cylindrical body 110, an outer cylindrical sleeve 112 circumscribing the outer end of the body 110, and a plurality of latching dogs 114 between the sleeve 112 and the body 110. The body is slidably mounted in a tu bular housing 116 that is rigidly fixed to the guideposts 58, such as by struts 60. In this embodiment of the invention, wherein two flow lines to the underwater well are illustrated, the two flow line extensions 34, 36 extend into the main body 110 to a fluidtight juncture with flow passages 120, 122 respectively, in the body 110.

The connectors wellhead component body 110 is axially slidable with respect to the housing 116, and is associated in a fluidtight manner therewith by annular seals 124, 126, 128 and 130, such as elastomeric O-rings or suitable packing material. Seal 124 is retained in a groove in an annular cap 132 that is threaded into the housing 116, the cap being fluidtight with the housing by virtue of an annular seal 134, and seals 128, are held by annular in the housing 116. The seal 126, however, is carried by a groove in an annular piston 136 that is threaded onto the body 110 and sealed thereto by another annular seal 138. Thus, two annular fluid chambers 140, 142 are established, chamber 140, defined by the cap 132, the housing 116, the piston 136, and the body 110, and chamber 142 by the piston 136, the housing 116, and the body 110. These chambers 140, 142 are part of an hydraulic system involved in moving the body 110 axially with respect to the housing 116, as will be described later.

The locking sleeve 112, which slidably surrounds the coupling end 144 of the body 110, comprises an end cap 146 and a dog-operating member 148 both threaded onto an inte rmcdiate member 150. The cap 146 carries three annular seals 152,154,156, the seal 154 providing fluid barrier between the cap and the coupling end 144, and the seal 156 between the cap and the intermediate member 150. The intermediate member has a central inwardly projecting annular flange 158 with an annular fluid seal 160 between the member 150 and the coupling end 144. Extending outwardly from the outer surface of the coupling end 144 is an annular flange 162 that carries an annular fluid seal 164 in a groove in its outer surface. Thus, the cap 146 and the flange 162 establish an annular fluid chamber 166 (seen best in FlGS. 6, 7 and 10) between the body 110 and the sleeve 112, and another annular fluid chamber 168 (seen best in FIGS. 5A and 9) between the body 110 and sleeve 112 is defined by the flanges 158, 162. These chambers 166,168 cooperate with the chambers 140,142 during coupling and uncoupling of the connector components 50,52, as will be fully described later.

As viewed best in FIGS. 5 and 5A, the latching dogs 114 are retained on the coupling end 144 of the body 110 by an inwardly projecting foot 170 that extends into an annular groove 172 in the outer surface of the coupling end 144, and by the foots forward surface 174 that bears against the surface 176 of the coupling ends annular outwardly projecting terminal flange 178. The dogs are held in retained position by the member 148 whose inner annular surface 180 lies adjacent the dog's outer surface 182. The threaded connection between the member 148 and the member 150 facilitates disassembly of these two elements to install or remove the dogs 114.

The connectors flow line component 52 includes a generally elongated tubular body 184 circumscribed by an axially slidable auxiliary uncoupler sleeve 186. The body 184 is rigidly fixed to the guide tubes 64 by suitable supports such as struts 62, so that the body does not move with respect to the tubes 64. The ends of the flow lines 46, 48 are connected in fluidtight manner to the body 184 in coaxial relationship with flow passages 190, 192, which in turn are coaxial with flow passages 120, 122 of the connectors wellhead component 50 when the two components are in coupling position.

J58 comes to rest against the flange I62. As the sleeve moves in this direction, its inner annular shoulder 282 contacts the arcuate surface 284 of the dogs [14, forcing this surface towards the body I10 of the connector component 50, and pivoting the dogs about their feet 170 into unlatched position, re, FIG. 7. Continued application of pressure on the fluid in line 266 then moves the body 110 to the right into the completeiy uncoupled position shown in FIG. 6.

In the fully uncoupled condition (FIG. 6), a small flow of hydraulic fluid will continue past the bypass ring 268, in a manner analogous to that past the ring 270 when the connector is fully coupled, thereby indicating at the control facility that the connector is in fact fully uncoupled and retracted.

Should for any reason the foregoing uncoupling operation not be available, such as a rupture in the hydraulic line 266, the second hydraulic system is used to move the auxiliary uncoupler sleeve 186 towards the connector component 50 until the flange I94 comes to rest against the flange [98. This forces the sleeve 112 from its FIGv 9 position back until its flange 148 comes to rest against the flange 162, unlatching the dogs 114 in the process, and then further back along with the body ll0 into the position shown in FIG. 10. This movement of the sleeve l86 is achieved by pressurizing hydraulic fluid in line 286, thereby forcing fluid into chamber 2l4 of component 52 and exhausting fluid from chamber 212 via line 288 to reservoir. Then, by reversing the fluid flow through these lines and chambers, the flange 198 is forced back to rest against the flange I94 thereby retracting the sleeve 36 into the position shown in FIG. 6, From this position, either or both components 50, 52 then can be retrieved.

Although the foregoing description of a preferred embodiment of the invention is based on a system involving two flow lines, it is to be understood that the invention includes systems wherein only one flow line, or more than two flow lines, are in volved. In addition, the invention is not limited to connecting flow lines to an underwater well, but encompasses other installations and conduits wherein connections are required, including connections between conduits themselves without the presence of a wellhead assembly or like apparatus.

Having completed a detailed description of the invention so that those skilled in the art could practice the same, I claim:

I A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends of two conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising:

a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b. a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit end and releasably latching it to said alignment facility;

c. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

d, means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component;

e, means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coax ial position; and

f. means for indicating at a remote location whether said conduit ends are coupled or uncoupled;

said latching facility including a stationary member on one of said connector components, and a movable member mounted on said alignment facility, whereby when said connector component approaches said alignment facility said movable member alters its position to latch with said stationary member, said stationary member comprising a stab hook mounted on and projecting radially outward from said con nector component, and said movable member comprising a pivotally mounted latch pin biased towards said stab hook and adapted to engage and releasably hold said stab hook when said connector component is in coupling position on said alignment facil t said moving means comprising a primary hydruuiit sys'i,. m connecting said movable component and a remote control facility, and a secondary hydraulic system connecting said stationary component and said remote control facility, and said indicating means including an annular fluid bypass member in said movable component and associated with said hydraulic system to reduce flow of hydraulic fluid past said member when said movable component in in one of said coupled or uncoupled positions.

2. A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends oftwo conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

. means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component;

d. means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coaxial position; and

e. a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit end and releasably latching it to said alignment facility, said latching facility including a stab hook and a pivotally mounted latch pin biased towards said stab hook, said latch pin adapted to engage and releasably hold said stab hook when said conduit end is in coupling position on said alignment facility.

3. A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends of two conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising:

a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b. a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit and and releasably latching it to said alignment facility, said latching facility including cam means to unlatch said conduit end from said alignment facility solely in response to the exertion of a force biasing apart said conduit end and said alignment facility;

c. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

d. means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component, said moving means comprising a primary hydraulic system connecting said movable component and a remote control facility, and a secondary hydraulic system connecting said stationary component and said remote control facility;

e. means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coaxial position; and

. means for indicating at a remote location whether said conduit ends are coupled or uncoupled, said indicating means comprising an annular fluid bypass member in said movable component and associated with said hydraulic system to reduce flow of hydraulic fluid past said member when said movable component is in one of said coupled or uncoupled positions.

4. A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends oftwo conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising:

a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b, a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit end and releasably latching it to said alignment facility;

c. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

d. means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component, said moving means comprising a primary hydraulic system connecting said movable component and a remote control facility, and a secondary hydraulic system connecting said stationary component and said remote control facility;

e. means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coaxial position; and hydraulic means for indicating at a tuiflOlC location whether said conduit ends are coupled or uncoupled, said indicating means comprising a hydraulic system associated with said movable connector component and including an annular fluid bypass element that retards the flow of hydraulic fluid in said system when said movable connector component is in its coupled or uncoupled position.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said bypass element is sleevelike with inner and outer surfaces and end surfaces, and includes at least one groove in each of said end surfaces extending generally radially between said inner and outer surfaces.

6. A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends of two conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising:

a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

c. means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component;

d. means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coaxial position;

e. hydraulic means for indicating at a remote location whether said conduit ends are coupled or uncoupled; and

f. a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit end and releasably latching it to said alignment facility, said latching facility including a stationary member on one of said connector components and a movable member on said alignment facility, said stationary member comprising a stab hook projecting radially outward from said connector component, said movable member comprising a pivotally mounted latch pin biased towards said stab hook and adapted to engage and releasably hold said stab hook when said connector component is in coupling position on said alignment facility.

7. A remotely controllable apparatus for coupling the ends of two conduits into fluidtight relationship, comprising:

a. an alignment facility for aligning the conduit ends into coaxial position;

b. a latching facility associated with said alignment facility for engaging a conduit end and releasably latching it to said alignment facility, said latching facility including rigid cam means to unlatch said conduit end from said alignment facility solely in response to the exertion of a force biasing apart said conduit end and said alignment facility;

c. conduit connector means attached to said conduit ends for releasably coupling and uncoupling said conduit ends to and from each other, said connector means comprising a stationary component and an axially movable component;

d. means for moving said movable component into coaxial engagement with said stationary component;

c means for releasably locking said movable component and said stationary component to each other in said coaxial position, and

f. hydraulic means for indicating at a remote location whether said conduitends are coupled or uncou le d 8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said latching acillty includes a stationary member on one of said connector components, and a movable member mounted on said alignment facility, whereby when said connector component approaches said alignment facility said movable member alters its position to latch with said stationary member.

9. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said moving means comprises a primary hydraulic system connecting said movable component and a remote control facility, and a secondary hydraulic system connecting said stationary component and said remote control facility.

10. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said hydraulic indicating means comprises an hydraulic system associated with said movable connector component, said hydraulic system including a restriction unit that retards the flow of hydraulic fluid in said system when said movable connector component is in its fully coupled or fully uncoupled condition.

r 3 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Dated July 6, 1971 Patent No. 1,204

KELLY V. SHIPES Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the aboveidentified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

insert grooves line 24, after "annular" Col. 4, Col. 7, line 20, after "flange" change Signed and sealed this 13th day of June 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. Attesting Officer- ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3717920 *Mar 25, 1971Feb 27, 1973Cameron Iron Works IncApparatus for making an underwater pipeline connection
US3775986 *Apr 27, 1972Dec 4, 1973Exxon Production Research CoMethod and apparatus for making remote pipeline connections
US3846992 *Apr 5, 1973Nov 12, 1974Subsea Equipment Ass LtdSystem of connection of a pipeline to an underwater pipeline and a method of putting it into effect
US3982776 *Sep 12, 1974Sep 28, 1976Sun Oil Company (Delaware)Apparatus for connecting submarine pipelines to offshore structures
US4319637 *Nov 7, 1980Mar 16, 1982Armco Inc.Well tool orientation system with remote indicator
US4337971 *Aug 7, 1980Jul 6, 1982Halliburton CompanyRemote connector
US4371291 *Jun 12, 1980Feb 1, 1983Smith International, Inc.Underwater flowline connector
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US8950979 *Jul 22, 2010Feb 10, 2015Fmc Kongsberg Subsea AsMethod for laying a pipeline on the seabed and a pipeline installation device
US20120224924 *Jul 22, 2010Sep 6, 2012Fmc Kongsberg Subsea AsMethod for laying a pipeline on the seabed and a pipeline installation device
Classifications
U.S. Classification285/26, 166/340, 285/315, 285/93, 285/306, 166/344
International ClassificationE21B43/00, E21B43/013, F16L39/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/013, F16L1/26, F16L39/00
European ClassificationF16L39/00, E21B43/013, F16L1/26