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Publication numberUS3591794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1971
Filing dateJul 17, 1968
Priority dateJul 17, 1968
Publication numberUS 3591794 A, US 3591794A, US-A-3591794, US3591794 A, US3591794A
InventorsHoward A Busby, Paul D Dail
Original AssigneePaul D Dail, Howard A Busby
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ceiling having lamps and sound absorbing and light reflecting surface
US 3591794 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Paul D. Dail 800 S. Sunset, Apt. 270, West Covina, Calif. 91790; Howard A. Busby, 6365 Lambda Drive, San Diego, Calif. 92120 [21] Appl. No. 745,595

[22] Filed July 17, 1968 [45] Patented July 6, 1971 [54] CElLiNG HAVING LAMPS AND SOUND ABSQRBING AND LIGHT REFLECTING SURFACE 9 Claims,5 Drawing Figs.

[52] 11.5. C1 240/9, 240/5 1.1 1, 52/28 [51] Int. Cl F2ls [50] Field of Search 52/28;

240/9,9A,5l.ll

[56] References Cited UNITED sures PATENTS 2,830,330 4/1953 Heath .I. 52/28 Primary Examiner-Samuel S. Matthews Assistant Examiner-D. J. Clement Attorney-Warren H. F Schmieding ABSTRACT: A suspended ceiling for a building which includes a plurality of modules, each including a frame, the frame being arranged in a common horizontally extending plane. At least certain of the frame carry elongated lamp fixtures which are supported by the fixed ceiling and above the frame sections. Sound absorbing light-reflecting panels have their lower ends carried by the said certain frames. These panels extend upwardly and terminate substantially at the light emitting surface of the lamp fixtures. Two of these panels are elongated, and, depending upon the width of the light fixtures, relative to the width of the module, the two panels are disposed at angles between approximately 158 and 163 with respect to the plane of the light emitting surface.

PATENTEDJUL 8l97| 3591.7 9 4 sum 1 OF 3 P ll INVENTORS PAUL 0. DA/L BY W ATTORNEY PATENTED JUL 6197i 3,591,794

SHEET 2 0F 3 INVISNT()RS PAUL 0. DAN. HOWARD A. BUSH) PATENTED JUL 6 l9?! SHEET 3 OF 3 INVENTORS PAUL 0. [MIL BY HOWARD A. ausax AND LIGHT REF LECTING SURFACE BACKGROUND OF 'THE INVENTION 1. Field ofthe Invention The invention is directed to suspended ceilings of the type employing sound absorbing material and-light fixtures.

2. Description of the Prior Art As far as applicants are aware, in the structure of theprior art the position of the light emitting surface with respect to: the angle of the sound absorbing. light-reflecting panels is such that the efficiency of illumination with respect to brightness is inadequate and also the lighting of the room is spotty. This is caused by improper positioning of the light emitting surface and panels.

In the applicants construction, angles of the panel are such that the light emanating from the light emitting surface of the light fixture, together with the light reflected from the panels, causesa uniform dispersion of light rays in the room at high illuminatirig value relative to brightness.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The suspended ceiling of the present invention is supported from the fixed ceiling of a building and includes frames; lighting fixtures and sound absorbing light-reflecting: panels are carried by the frames. Those panels, which are carried by the frames having light fixtures disposed thereabove, extend upwardly at angles from the frames at between 158 and 163 with respect to the plane of the light emitting surface of the lighting fixtures and terminateat substantially the plane of the light emitting surfaces of the light fixtures.

Other features and the advantages of the present. invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying-drawings wherein a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the improved soundabsorbing light-reflecting ceiling, looking upwardly;

FIG. 2 is a bottom view ofa fragment ofthe'ceiling, but on a larger scale;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are fragmentary sectional views taken on lines 3-3 and 4-4, respectively of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view looking downwardly from. the fixed ceiling of the room.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring more in detail to the invention, the main ceiling 20 of a room carries a plurality. of frames 22 by wires 24. These wires are suitably fastened to the ceiling 20 and to the frames. Each frame (see FIG. 5) includes two parallel, coextensive and horizontally extending runners 26 and 28 which are suspended from the lower ends of the wires 24. Each frame section includes two lower runners 30'and 32 which are parallel and coextensive with upper runners26 and28 and are suspended from the latter runners by vertically extending struts 33. These struts are suitably secured to the runners 26, 28, 30 and 32. Each frame includes lower side runners 34 and 36 which extend transversely of the lower runner 30 and 32 and-are suitably secured to the ends of the latter runners. The frame parts are formed preferably of roll-formed steel.

Each frame supports parallel, coextensive and horizontally extending runners 38 and 40. These latter runners extend at right angles relative to the aforementioned upper runners 26 and'28 and are notched as at 41 to interfit with those upper runners. A lighting fixture 42 is suitably fixed to the pair of runners 38 and 40. Thus the runners not only removably support the lighting fixtures but also tie the frame runners with one another to thus stabilize the entire module. The lighting fixture includes an elongated, inverted and horizontally extending pan including a top wall 44, elongated sidewalls 46 and 48 and end walls 50 and $2. The underside of top wall is in the form of a reflector of light. The lower ends 01 sidewalls 46 and 48 are provided with hinges 54 which support a flat translucent element 56 forming a light emitting surface. Spring clips 57 hold the element in place. Several elongated and coextensive fluorescent lamps 58 are disposed above the translucent element 56 and are carried in the usual manner by end walls 50 and 52.

The sidewalls 46 and 48 and end walls 50 and 52 are provided with outwardly and downwardly extendingflanges 60. The lower runners 30 and 32. of the frame 22' are provided with inwardly extending U-shaped flanges 62 and like flanges 64 are formed on the transversely disposed lower runners 34 and 36.

Two elongated sound. absorbing, light-reflecting panels 66 arecarried by the runners 34 and 36 and by the lighting fixture 42. As seen more clearly in' FIG. 3, the lower ends of the panels rest in the U-shaped flanges 62 of runners 34 and 36 and the-upper ends of the panels rest on outwardly extending flanges 60 of the fixture 42. Two sound absorbing, lightreflecting panels 68. are carried by runners 30 and 32 on the fixture 42.

As seen more clearly in FIG. 4, the lower ends of panels 68 rest inthe U-shaped'flanges 64 of runners 30 and 32 and the upper ends of the panels rest on the outwardly extending flanges 60 of the fixture.

It is to be observed that the upper ends of thefour panels extend to adjacent the light emitting surface provided by the translucentelement 56 of thelight fixture 42. Depending upon the overall'width of the particular module, including the two panels 66 and the light fixture, the angle of the panels varies from approximately 158 to approximately 163 with respect to the horizontal plane of the light emitting surface i.e., if for example the module has awidth of 5 feet and a length of 5 feet and the lighting fixture illuminating surface has a width of 2 feet, then in that event the angle between the horizontal plane of the illuminating surface and the elongated panels will be approximately 158. Likewise, if the module has awidth of four feet and the fixture has a width of one foot, the angle between the horizontal plane of the illuminating surface will be approximately 158. The angles of the panels 68 are between 55and 60". In all modules the area of the light emitting surface plus the area of the sound absorbing, light-reflecting surfaces of the four panels will be approximately one hundred ten percent 1 10 percent) of the total horizontal surface of themodule.

It has been found in actual practice that when the light emitting surface'is lowered to adjacent the upper ends of the side panels 66 and the angles are maintained between 17 and 229 with respect to horizontal, and that by spacing the modules as shown in FIG. 1, substantially uniform light. value is enjoyed throughout the area covered by the composite suspended ceiling with spaced modules only carrying lighting fixtures-as shown. Also by reason of the foregoing construction and arrangement higher illumination levels have been achieved without increase in the relative brightness thereby attaining a high level of visual efficiency and consequent comfort. The'modules interposed between those having lighting fixtures are also formed of sound absorbing (acoustic), lightreflecting material.

It has also been found in actual practice that the combination-v of the light fixture and the sound-absorbing, light reflecting panel provides a proper balance of sound absorbing, sound reflecting and light reflecting characteristics.

From the foregoing it is readily apparent that there has been provided a subceiling which provides proper and desirable room illuminating and sound absorbing characteristics. High light value and uniform lighting has been achieved without increase in brightness, and the effective ratio of sound absorbing and sound reflecting characteristics have been achieved. These characteristics have been achieved by disposing the light emitting surface of the light fixture at approximately the upper ends of elongated sound absorbing, light-reflecting panels and maintaining the angle of these elongated panels between 17 and 22.

We claim:

1. A suspended ceiling for a building, comprising in combination:

A. a frame;

B. means for supporting the frame within the building;

C. a unitary structure including:

1. a lighting fixture having:

a. means forming a horizontally extending, lightemitting surface, b. panel-supporting means on opposite sides of the means (C) (l)a); 2. a support for removably supporting the unitary structure on the frame;

D. a plurality of removable acoustic, light-reflecting panels, each having one edge supported by the frame and the other edge supported by the means (C) (l) (a).

2. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 1 characterized in that the light-emitting surface and the panel-supporting means are disposed above the bottom of the frame and that the first mentioned edges of the panels are disposed at a lower level than the second mentioned edges, whereby the panels are disposed at obtuse angles with respect to the plane of the light emitting surface.

3. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 2, characterized in that the second mentioned edges of the panels terminate substantially at the same level as the light-emitting surface.

4. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 1, characterized in that the frame includes:

A. 1 two parallelly disposed runners; and further characterized in that the support (C) (2) of the unitary structure is removably supported by the runners.

5. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 4, characterized in that the support (C) (2) of the unitary structure comprises at least one runner disposed transversely of the first mentioned runners and in notched relationship with the first mentioned runners.

6. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 1, characterized in that the frame includes:

A. l a pair of parallelly disposed runners, said runners extending horizontally and in coextensive relationship,

2 a second pair of parallelly disposed runners, said latter pair of runners extending horizontally and in coextensive relationship with the first mentioned runners, said second pair of runners with the first mentioned pair,

3 means connecting the second pair of runners with the first mentioned pairs,

4 a third pair of parallelly disposed runners, said latter pair of runners extending horizontally and transversely with respect to and supported by the second pair of runners;

and further characterized in that the support (C) (2) of the unitary structure is removably supported by the first mentioned pair of runners.

7. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 1, characterized in that the frame includes:

A. l a pair of parallelly disposed runners, said runners extending horizontally and in coextensive relationship,

2 a second pair of parallelly disposed runners, said latter pair of runners extending horizontally and in coextensive relationship with the first mentioned runners, said second pair of runners being disposed below the first mentioned pair,

3 means connecting the second pair of runners with the first mentioned pairs,

4 a third pair of parallelly disposed runners, said latter pair of runners extending horizontally and transversely with respect to and supported by the second pair of runners;

and further characterized in that the support (C) (2) of the unitary structure comprises a pair of runners for supporting the unitary structure, said latter pair of runners being disposed transversely of the first mentioned runners.

8. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 6, characterized in that the first mentioned edges of the panels are removably su ported by the third mentioned runners. I

B. A suspended ceiling as defined in claim 8, characterized in that the panel supporting means (C) (l) (b) lie in substantially the same plane as the light-emitting surface.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 591 794 Dated Julv 6, 1971 Inventor(s) B D D j] d H d A E h It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 4, line 5 delete "with" After "runners" insert --being disposed below".

Signed and sealed this 9th day of November 1971.

(SEAL) Atteat:

EDWARD M.F'LETCHER,JR. ROBERT GO'I'TSCHALK Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2830330 *Jun 25, 1953Apr 15, 1958Paul Heath WilfridMeans for acoustical correction and noise absorption
US3343310 *Nov 16, 1964Sep 26, 1967Integrated Systems IncOverhead ceiling structure with an integral fixture assembly
US3372270 *Sep 22, 1965Mar 5, 1968Emerson Electric CoCeiling modules
US3397499 *Mar 17, 1965Aug 20, 1968Inland Steel Products CompanySupport system for a ceiling
US3426188 *Nov 3, 1966Feb 4, 1969Integrated Systems IncFixture for use in a suspended grid ceiling system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4175360 *May 2, 1977Nov 27, 1979Mulvey Gerard ECoffered ceiling system
US4363082 *Aug 26, 1980Dec 7, 1982Levolor Lorentzen, Inc.Panel ceiling and light fixture
US5111631 *Mar 14, 1988May 12, 1992Ronald FloodModular display construction system
US6748713 *Oct 2, 2002Jun 15, 2004Tosser J. SeeSuspended ceiling construction
US7937903 *Mar 7, 2007May 10, 2011PortafabPanelized ceiling system
US7971680 *Jan 11, 2008Jul 5, 2011Spirit Acoustics Inc.Acoustic systems for lighting in suspended ceilings
WO2012042429A2 *Sep 19, 2011Apr 5, 2012Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Illumination device and luminaire
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/150, 52/28
International ClassificationF21S2/00, F21V33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00, F21S2/00, F21V33/006, F21Y2103/00
European ClassificationF21S2/00, F21V33/00, F21V33/00B