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Publication numberUS3594694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1971
Filing dateNov 8, 1968
Priority dateNov 8, 1968
Also published asCA919789A, CA919789A1, DE1956162A1, DE1956162B2, DE1956162C3
Publication numberUS 3594694 A, US 3594694A, US-A-3594694, US3594694 A, US3594694A
InventorsClark Thomas A
Original AssigneeG & H Technology
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Quick disconnect connector
US 3594694 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1721 Invent r Thomas A. Clark 2,892,991 6/1959 B66666 6:61. 339/91 B Mountain View, Calif. 3,039,794 6 1962 De CCIIZO 285/316 x 1211 App 774,347 3,323,814 6/1967 Phillips 339/45 x [22 Fil -8. 1968 3,336,562 8/1967 McCormick eial 339/91 x 1 1 Pawnwd J y 20,197! 3,452,316 6/1969 Panek 6i al. 339/45 M [73] Assignee G & H Technology, Inc.

Santa Monica, Calif.

[54] QUICK DISCONNECT CONNECTOR 15 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.Cl 339/45 M, 285/81 R, 285/316 R. 339/46 R, 339/75 M, 339/91 R [51] lnLCl .H0lrl3/54, HOlr 13/62 [50) Field ofSearch ..339/34. 45, 46, 75,91; 285/27, 81, 316, 319

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner Ernest R. Purser Assistant E.mminer-Terrell P. Lewis Attorney-Dan R. Sadler ABSTRACT: A fluidtight electrical connector is disclosed herein which has a lock for releasably securing a pair of mating sections together. The lock is adapted to secure the sections together when a first portion thereof is axially moved a predetermined distance in the direction of engagement, and to unlock the connector sections and cause them to separate when a second portion thereof is axially moved a predetermined distance opposite the direction of engagement. The connector includes means for producing a consistent interface pressure between the connector sections and means for indicating when the electrical terminals of the locked connector 2,690,918 10/1954 Holte 285/316 X sections are not in complete engagement.

M 14 "321. r 2 134 12a j i Q 2; ii 32 1a 72 M i2 22 2a I I [J/ :Y; /!74 I. 42 116 PATENTED JUL20 Ian sum 1 OF 2 MN m.

llmwlxlll ama! A 674/16 PM 147709446) PATENTEU JUL20|97I 3,594,694

SHEET 2 [EF 2 QUICK DISCONNECT CONNECTOR BACKGROUND OF THE lNVENTlON,

It is often necessary to effect a temporary connection between two electrical cables, which connection can be quickly and conveniently disengaged when desired. One type of connector in common use includes a plug section and a receptacle section, each connected to a different one'of the cables, the section being adapted for mating to produce an electrical path therethrough.

for terminal connection with a wire) included by the receptacle section. The pins are, of course, insulated from one another within the plug section, while the sockets are insulated from one another within the receptacle section. lf the cables are shielded, such as by metal braid or other shielding material surrounding the cables, the electrical terminals within the connector are ordinarily shielded by means of conductive shells included by each of the sections and which house the pin and socket assemblies. Each shell is connected to the shielding of a respective cable, and the mating ends of these shells are adapted for being electrically coupled to one another when the pins are fully mated within the complementary sockets, thereby completing a shielding path between the cables and around the terminals.

In many situations, it is desirable that the connector be pro vided with means for temporarily locking the sections to one another when mated. One obvious reason for such locking is so that the sections cannot be pulled apart to disengage the terminals when the two cables are inadvertently pulled opposite one another. Furthermore, it is often preferred that the multiconductor connector be provided with sealing means between the obverse faces of the respective sections when mated, for example for preventing ambient fluids from entering the interface. A nonconductive, resilient sealingmember can be utilized at the interface, and the locking means can coerce the two sections against opposing sides of the resilient member, thereby sealing the interface.

Releasable locking means of various configurations have been utilized with sealed multiconductor connectors of the prior art. However, all of these are operable to lock or unlock the two connector sections through motions different than the motions required to engage or disengage the pins from the sockets. ln many types of connectors, for example those having a fastening nut engageable between the two sections, a twisting motion is required to lock and unlock the sections whereas axial motion is required to mate and separate the pins and the sockets. Other types of connectors utilize cams and cam follower combinations, actuated by a lever or other device which must be operated in a manner independent of the mating and separation operations.

Although connectors of the prior art are well suited to provide locked and securely sealed connections of complementary terminals, the plurality of motions required for their assembly, and particularly for their disassembly, presents problems when it is desired to very quickly and conveniently connect or disconnect the sections. These problems become significant when it is desired to remotely or automatically actuate the connector to disengage, since a coupled actuator package may be required to generate and transmit a sequence of different motions to the connector. Besides making the connector operations susceptible to malfunction, such complicated motions increase the time required to axially disengage the connector after a disconnect command signal has been received by the actuator package.

SUMMARY The connector of the present invention overcomes the foregoing difficulties, by providing locking and unlocking means which operate to lock the two connector sections together when axially moved a predetermined distance in the direction'of pin-socket engagement, and which unlocks the two sections and causes them to separate when axially moved a pr edetermined distance in the direction of pin-socket disengagement. After the two connector sections have been locked together, the unlocking means is unresponsive to forces which might be applied to the cables, so that the connector of the present invention cannot be separated if the cables are inadvertently pulled opposite one another.

The locking and unlocking means of the present invention operates in cooperation with first and second conductive shells which house the pin and socket assemblies. The second shell contains thereon latch means which are moveably disposed axially through a limited distance on the second shell, and the first shell is adapted to engagedly receive the latch means. The second shell further includes keeper means which is moveably disposed axially through a limited distance with respect to the latch means, and is actuated by the latch means for coercing the latch means to engage the first shell and to be locked thereto when the pin and socket assemblies are axially intercngaged and the latch means is axially moved a predetermined distance toward thefirst shell. The keeper means further releases the latch means from engagement with the first shell, when the keeper means is axially moved a predetermined distance away from the first shell.

Biasing means are further provided, coupling the latch means and the second shell, for biasing the second shell toward the first shell when the latch means engages the first shell. This permits positive conductive communication between the two shells, by either placing the shells in physical contact or by biasing the shells against a conductive member which effects a conductive path between the shells when the connector sections are axially interengaged.

In a preferred embodiment of the connector of the present invention, the first connector section can include the socket assembly housed in a first conductive shell, while the second connector section can include a pin assembly house in a second conductive shell. The first and second assemblies include first and second faces respectively, which are positioned obverse one another when the assemblies are axially interengaged, and the connector further includes an electrically nonconductive, resilient member covering one of the faces to effect a fluidtight seal between the assemblies when the connector sections are axially interengaged and the obverse faces are biased toward one another.

The first shell includes an annular shoulder which cooperates with the latch means of the second shell, for locking the two connector sections together, The latch means can include a plurality of resilient fingers moveably disposed axially on the second shell, each of the fingers having a tip portion adapted for engaging the shoulder. The tip portions are normally deflected in a radially outer position (with respect to the longitudinal axis of the connector) such that the tip portions can be passed over the shoulder during axial engagement and disengagement of the pin and socket assemblies.

Keeper means are axially moveable over the fingers, for coercing the tip portions into a radially inner position to en"- gage the shoulder after the tip portions are passed thereover in a direction toward the socket assembly, and for releasing the tip portions to assume the radially outer position when the keeper means is coerced a predetermined distance in a direction opposite the socket assembly. During engagement, the keeper means is responsive to movement of the fingers, so that when the radially extended tip portions pass over the shoulder, the keeper means is automatically. actuated to coerce the tip portions into the radially inner pob ition and to be retained by the shoulder.

Biasing means are provided which couple the fingers and the second shell, and which bias the tip portions engageably toward the shoulder in a direction opposite the socket assembly while biasing the second shell axially toward the first shell. This biases the two assembly faces against opposing sides of the resilient member at the connector interface, producing a consistent interface pressure for maintaining the fluidtight seal, regardless of any changes in the characteristics of the resilient member which may occur (for example, through prolonged curing or aging).

An electrically conductive, flexible clip member can be provided which interconnects both sides of the resilient member in the vicinity of the resilient member's edges. When the two connector sections are locked together, the biasing means further compressibly biases the clip member against the two shells for effecting a conductive path therebetween.

To effect disengagement of the connector sections, the keeper means is moved axially a predetermined distance in a direction opposing the socket assembly, permitting the fingertip portions to be radially released and to assume the radially outer position, disengaged from and passable over the annular shoulder of the first shell. Further axial movement in the same direction causes the keeper means to bear against a collet shoulder coupled to the fingers, coercing the fingers to move relative to the second shell and the fingertip portions to pass over the first shell annular shoulder. Still further axial movement of the keeper means produces cooperation between the fingers and the second shell, causing the second shell to move opposite the first shell with consequent disengagement of the pin assembly from the socket assembly.

In electrical connectors of the type discussed herein, the terminal pins are generally quite long in relation to their diameter, and are consequently subject to inadvertent bending, particularly if one or more pins are slightly misaligned with respect to their complementary sockets. When the two sections of typical prior art connectors are locked together, a bent pin which is not engaged in the complementary socket is difficult or impossible to detect before electrical use, a problem which produces operational conditions ranging from inconvenient to catastrophic.

The preferred connector of the present invention provides means for detecting the presence of one or more bent pins when the connector sections are in a locked configuration. As stated earlier, the second shell and the pin assembly are biased toward the connector interface by the biasing means which is coupled to the fingers, so that the second shell and the pin assembly axially float with respect to the fingers. If an extraneous object is present in the interface, such as a bent pin, the second shell will be restrained from being fully positioned toward the first shell. Indicator means are provided on the second shell for determining whether the pin assembly face is displaced from a satisfactory interfacial position. For example, a mark can be placed on the second shell at a location where the mark is hidden by the collet (which is coupled to the locked fingers) when the pin assembly face is in the appropriate interfacial position, but where the mark is visible when the second shell in inappropriately extended away from the first shell. Since the pin assembly is restrainably housed by the second shell, this latter condition corresponds to the pin assembly face being displaced from a satisfactory interfacial position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The novel features which are believed to be characteristic of the present invention, together with further advantages thereof, will be better understood from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawing in which a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated by way of example. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawing is for the purpose of illustration and description only, and is not intended as a definition of the limits of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of an electrical connector embodying one form of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view (similar to FIG. 1 but on a reduced scale) of the connector in a separated or unmated condition, the top half of the left position is in one operating condition and the bottom half is in another operating condit|on.

FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the connector in a separated or unmated condition.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to the drawing in greater detail, a multiconductor electrical connector 10 is shown, and includes a first connector section 12 and a complementary second connector section 14. The first connector section 12 includes a first shell member 16 of general cylindrical configuration, while the second connector section 14 includes a second shell member 18 of general cylindrical configuration.

In this preferred embodiment, the cylindrical configuration of the shell members 16,18 is substantially right-circular, and the shell members 16,18 have a common longitudinal axis when the sections 12,14 are connected or aligned for connection. As used herein, the term "axial is meant to refer to this common longitudinal axis, and such terms as axial move ment" and "axial direction" are intended to indicate that such movement and direction is parallel to the common longitudinal axis. For example, the axial directions are indicated by the double-ended arrow 20.

The first and second sections 12,14 include electrical terminal assemblies 22,24 housed within the first and second shell members 16,18, respectively. Corresponding pairs of terminals between the two assemblies 22,24 are adapted to interfit when the connector sections 12,14 are connected.

For example, in the preferred embodiment, the second terminal assembly 24 includes a plurality of electrical elements 26, restrained from axial movement within an electrically insulating core 28 which can be comprised of two portions 30,32 for convenience of assembling the electrical elements 26 therein. One end of each electrical element 26 includes an electrically conductive pin 34 which axially projects through a face 36 of the second electrical terminal (or pin) assembly 24. An opposing end of each electrical element 26 is adapted to securedly receive a portion of an electrically conductive wire 38 from which surrounding insulation 40 has been removed.

The core 28 is restrained within the second shell member 18 by means of an end ring 42 which is secured to the second shell member 18, for example by external ring threads 44 complementing internal shell threads 46. The end ring 42 abuts against a rear surface of the core 28, forcing a core opposing shoulder 50 against an annular restraining shoulder 52 internally disposed on the second shell member 18.

The core 28 is further prevented from rotational movement, for example by means of a fin 54 extending from the second shell member 18 into a slot 56 in the core 28.

The construction of the first electrical terminal assembly 22 is similar in many respects to the construction of the second electrical terminal assembly 24, and primed reference numerals are utilized to indicate parts which are substantially similar to those parts indicated by unprimed reference numerals. The essential difference between the two assemblies, however, is that each of the electrical elements 26 includes a socket 58 adapted to conductively receive a complementary pin 34 upon projected insertion of the complementary pin 34 through a corresponding axial bore 60 in the core 28 interconnecting the socket 58 and a face 36 of the first electrical terminal (or socket) assembly 22.

In this preferred embodiment, the first shell member includes a face portion 64 which is bored to receive core portions containing the bores 60 which communicate the sockets 58 to the socket assembly face 22. Other embodiments wherein the first shell member face portion 64 is not present (i.e. wherein the socket assembly core 28 extends throughout its cross section to the socket assembly face 36 similar to the pin assembly face 36) are of course possible, and are within the scope of the present invention.

It should be noted that, in the preferred embodiment, the socket assembly core 28' is axially restrained within the second shell member 18 by means of the end ring 42' coercing the core 28' against rear surfaces of the first shell face portion 64.

When the socket and pin assemblies 22,24 are axially interengaged, their respective faces 36,36 are positioned obverse one another. A fluidtight seal is produced at the interface by the provision of an electrically nonconductive, resilient member such as a silicone rubber gasket 68 between the two faces 36',36. The gasket 68 includes apertures through which the pins 34 extend, and each of these apertures is surrounded by a tapered boss 70 which mates with a countersink 72 at the face end of each of the bores 60. The taper of the bosses 70 and the angle of the countersinks 72 complement one another, by the countersinks 72 are shallow in proportion to the uncompressed height or the bosses 70. For clarity of description, the gasket 68 is shown in an uncompressed condition, with the bosses 70 mating with the countersinks 72. As will be discussed later, however, means are provided for compressing the gasket 68 between the two faces 36,36, so that the bosses 70 are in fluidtight contact with the pins 34 and the countersinks 72, and the gasket 68 is in fluidtight contact with the portions of the pins 34 within the interface and with the pin assembly face 36.

The cables which contain the two pluralities of wires 38,38 ordinarily are surrounded by a conductive braid or skin for providing a high-frequency shield thereto. This shield should be continuous across the connector 10. Accordingly, means can be provided for clamping the respective shielding material surrounding the cables to the ends of the corresponding shell members 16,18, such as by appropriate end fittings (not shown) con ductively connected between the corresponding cable skin and shell member.

When the first connector section or receptacle" l2 and the second connector section of plug" 14 are connected to one another, conductive communication between the shell members 16,18 is provided through the interface by means of a flexible coupling member 74 which effects an interfacial conductive path between the two shell members 16,18.

As stated earlier, the physical characteristics of the gasket 68 tend to change with time. The pin assembly face 36 is biased toward the socket assembly face 36' is such manner as to provide a consistent interface pressure in the gasket 68 (as explained later) and it is preferred that the pin assembly face 36 be permitted sufficient axial movement to compensate for physical changes of the gasket 68. Since the core 28 is axially restrained by the second shell 18, so that the pin assembly face 1 36 axially follows the movements of the second shell 18, this preference requires that the second shell 18 also be permitted sufficient axial movement while at the same time being in conductive communication with the first shell member 16. Accordingly, the coupling member 74 can be a flexible, metallic, generally U-shaped ring enclosing the edges of the gasket 68, and having a first leg adapted for sliding contact with an end face 78 of the first shell member 16 and a second leg 80 which contacts the second shell 18, when the second shell 18 is axially biased towards the first shell 16. The structure and operationof this type of coupling member 74 is discussed in greater detail in a patent of Ser. No. 606,077 entitled Connector, filed Dec. 30, 1967, filed in the name of John J. Phillips and as signed of record to G 8; H Technology, Inc.

If desired, the interface end of the second shell 18 can be modified as shown in the drawing, wherein a highly conductive ring 82 (consisting for example of silver) is electron beam welded to the second shell 18 for providing corrosion-free contact therebetween.

in order that the receptacle and plug sections 12,14 be brought together such that the same pins 34 always engage the same sockets 58, the plug section 14 can be provided with a key which engages a keyway in the receptacle section 12.

The receptacle section 12 is provided with a mounting flange 88, for connecting the receptacle section to a mounting structure if desired.

The plug section 14 includes a plurality of axially disposed fingers surrounding the second shell member 18. The bases of the fingers are interconnected to form a flange 92 which extends to a collar 94 surrounding the second shell member 18. A collet 96 is secured to the rear portion of the collar 94, such as by complementing threads within the collar 94 and on the collet 96, respectively. The fingers 90, flange 92, collar 94 and collet 96 are axially slidable as a single unit with respect to the second shell member 18.

The second shell member 18 is provided with an outwardly extending flange 102 located within the space between the collar 94 and the main body of the second shell member 18. Biasing means, such as a first helical spring 104 about the circumference of the second shell member 18, bears against obverse surfaces of the shell flange 102 and the collet 96.

The fingers 90 can be made nonrotational with respect to the second shell member 18, for example by the provision of a fin extending from the second shell member 18 and engaging a channel in the common base of the fingers 90 or extending between adjacent fingers.

Each of the fingers 90 include a tip portion which is cantilevered from the second shell member 18. The tip portions 110 are adapted for engaging the first shell member 16, and for being latched thereto.

in the preferred embodiment, for example, the first shell member 16 includes an annular shoulder 112, while each of the fingertip portions 110 includes a complementing shoulder 114. Normally, the fingertip portions 110 are deflected in a radially outer position such that the tip portions 110 are axially passable over the annular shoulder 112. When the tip portions 110 are passed over the annular shoulder 112, however, and the tip portions are radially coerced inwardly to assume a radially inner position as shown in the drawing, the tip portion complementing shoulder 114 is restrained by the second shell member annular shoulder 112 from relative axial movement which would otherwise tend to separate the plug section 16 from the receptacle section 14.

The fingertip portions 110 are coerced into the radially inner position by a keeper sleeve 116 which surrounds the fingers 90 and which is adapted for axial movement with respect thereto. The keeper sleeve 116 includes a flange 118 extending into a collar 120 which is axially slideable upon the finger collar 94. Biasing means, such as a second helical spring 122 situated within the keeper collar 120 and bearing against obverse surfaces of the keeper flange 118 and the finger flange 92, is provided for maintaining the keeper sleeve 116 in an extended position as shown in the drawing when the receptacle section 14 and the plug 16 are connected.

For assisting alignment of the receptacle and plug sections 14,16 during connection, a pilot sleeve 124 can be provided on the plug section 16 (for example) for insertion into an axially directed groove 126 in the receptacle section 14. The pilot sleeve 124 can extend from the finger flange 92, and can include axial slots therein to permit radial movement of the fingertip portions 110.

When it is desired to separate the plug section 14 from the receptacle section 12, the keeper collar 120 is axially moved in a direction opposite the receptacle section 12 (i.e. to the left as shown in the drawing), against the biasing force provided by the second spring 122. When the front" face 128 of the keeper sleeve 116 is moved rearward of a tapered release shoulder 130 on each of the fingertip portions 110, the fingertip portions 110 assume their radially outer position so that their complementing shoulders 114 are no longer restrained by the first shell annular shoulder 112 and are passable thereover. Further movement of the keeper collar 120 causes its rear face 132 to contact a stop 134 on the finger collar 94, causing the fingers 90 to axially move with still further movement of the keeper collar 120. This causes the fingertip portions 110 to pass over the first shell annular shoulder 112, and the pins 34 are separated from the sockets 58 after the finger flange 92 meets with and drives the shell flange 102 opposite the receptacle section 12.

if desired, a hook member 136 can be attached to the keeper collar 120, and a lanyard (not shown) can be secured thereto for either proximate or remote actuation of the keeper collar 120. Furthermore, a remote control actuator package (not shown) can be coupled to the hook member 136, for automatically separating the plug section 14 from the receptacle section 12.

When it is desired to connect the plug section 14 to the receptacle section 12, the fingertip portions 110 are replaced in their radially outer position by axially moving the keeper collar 120 rearwardly. This causes the keeper sleeve 116 to slide along the pilot sleeve 124 until the keeper sleeve'front face 128 passes over the fingertip release shoulder 130. Rearward movement of the keeper collar 120 is thereupon stopped, and the keeper sleeve front face 128 is restrained from forward" movement by the release shoulder 130. This biases the second spring 122, so that the keeper sleeve 116 is in a cocked condition.

The plug and receptacle sections 14,12 are thereupon aligned with respect to one another, and the pins 34 are inserted in their complementary sockets 58 through assistance of the pilot sleeve and groove combination 124,126 and the mating key and keyway combination 84,86. The finger collar 94 is thereupon axially moved toward the receptacle section 12, until the complementing shoulders 114 of the fingertip portions 110 pass over the first shell annular shoulder 112. During this axial movement of the fingers 90 over the second shell member 18, an internal rib 138 rides on the external surface of the second shell member, causing the fingertip portions 110 to maintain its radially outer position regardless of the biasing force exerted by the keeper sleeve front face 128 upon the release shoulder 130. After the tip portion complementing shoulder 114 has passed over the first shell annular shoulder 112, however, the rib 138 is released from the second shell member surface. This causes the biasing force of the second spring 122 to axially move the keeper sleeve 116 toward the receptacle section 12, until the keeper sleeve front face 128 contacts a stop 140 on the receptacle section 12. The fingertip portions 110 are therefore coerced into assuming their radially inner position, their complementing shoulders 114 being retained from axially separating movement by the first shell annular shoulder 112.

The axial movement of the finger collar 92 with respect to the second shell member 18 causes the first spring 104 to be compressed. This biases the second shell member 18 toward the first shell member 16, and consequently the pin assembly core 28 is biased toward the socket assembly core 28', compressing the gasket 68 between the assembly faces 36,36 Any changes in the resiliency or thickness of the gasket material is therefore compensated by the presence of the biasing force provided by the first spring 104, so that the interface pressure remains consistent with time.

After connection of the receptacle and plug sections 12,14, the presence of a bent pin 34 in the interface is automatically indicated. Since the second shell member 18 and the pin assembly 24 axially float with respect to the finger collet 96, an indicator or pin detector mark 142 can be placed on the exterior surface of the second shell member 18 at a location where the mark 142 is hidden by the finger collet 96 when the pin assembly face 36 is in an appropriate interfacial position. When the pin assembly face 36 is extended away from an appropriate interfacial position, such as when a bent pin 34 or other extraneous object is present in the interface, the second shell member 18 assumes an abnormal axial position with respect to the collet 96, causing the pin detector mark 142 to be visible.

Thus there has been shown a preferred embodiment of an electrical connector having releasable locking means which operates to lock the two connector sections together w hen axially moved a predetermined distance in the direction of a pinsocket engagement, and which unlocks the two sections and causes them to separate when axially moved a predetermined distance in the direction of pin-socket disengagement. The present invention provides means for producing a consistent interface pressure between the two connector sections, re gardless of changes in physical characteristics of the material forming the interfacial sealing gasket. Furthermore, the invention provides means for detecting the presence of one or more bent pins in the interface when the connector sections are in a locked configuration.

Other embodiments of the present invention and modifications of the embodiment herein presented may be developed without department from the essential characteristics thereof. For example, the locking and unlocking means herein disclosed should not be limited for use solely with electrical-type connectors, but combination with other types of connectors whereby it is desired to rapidly connect and disconnect two opposing members (such as hose, tubing, rod or cable) are considered to be encompassed by the present invention.

Accordingly, the invention should be limited only by the scope of the claims listed below.

What I claim as new is:

1. In an electrical connector having first and second assemblies including electrical terminals adapted to interfit when the assemblies are axially interengaged, the combination comprising:

a first shell member housing the first assembly, said first shell member including an annular shoulder thereon;

a second shell member housing the second assembly;

a plurality of resilient fingers movably disposed axially on said second shell member, each of said fingers having a tip portion adapted for restrainably engaging said shoulder, said tip portion normally deflected in a radially outer position passable over said shoulder;

keeper means axially movable over said fingers for coercing said tip portions into a radially inner position for engaging said shoulder when said tip portions are passed thereover in a direction toward the first assembly, and for releasing said tip portions to assume the radially outer position when said keeper means is coerced a predetermined distance in a direction opposite the first assembly; and

biasing means coupling said fingers and said second shell member for biasing said tip portions engageably toward said shoulder in a direction opposite the first assembly while biasing said second shell member axially toward said first shell member when the first and second assemblies are axially interengaged.

2. The apparatus according to claim 1, above, further including:

a reference mark on said second shell member located to be visibly hidden by said fingers when said second shell member is biased toward said first shell member to an extent corresponding to complete axial interengagement of the first and second assemblies, and to be visibly exposed when said second shell member is biased toward said first shell member to an extent corresponding to incomplete axial interengagement of the first and second assemblies.

3. The apparatus according to claim 1, above, further including second biasing means coupling said keeper means and said fingers, for urging said keeper means axially over said tip portions when the assemblies are axially interengaged.

4. The apparatus according to claim 1, above, wherein the first and second assemblies include first and second faces respectively, positioned obverse one another when the assemblies are axially interengaged, and further including:

an electrically nonconductive, resilient gasket member covering one of said faces, said biasing means biasing said first and second faces against opposing sides of said gasket member to effect a fluidtight seal therebetween when the first and second assemblies are axially interengaged.

5. The apparatus according to claim 1, above, wherein said first and second shell members are electrically conductive, and further including:

means for effecting a conductive path between said first and second shell members when the assemblies are axially interengaged.

6. The apparatus according to claim it, above, wherein said first and second shell members are electrically conductive, and the first and second assemblies include first and second faces respectively, said faces positioned obverse one another when the assemblies are axially interengaged, and further including:

an electrically nonconductive, resilient gasket member covering one of said faces, said biasing means biasing said first and second faces against opposing sides of said gasket member to effect a fluidtight seal therebetween when the first and second assemblies are axially interengaged, and

means for effecting a conductive path between said first and second shell members when the assemblies are axially interengaged.

7. The apparatus according to claim ll, above, wherein said first and second shell members are electrically conductive,

and said first shell member includes an electrically conductive face portion perforated to receive the second assembly terminals but insulated therefrom.

8. An electrical connector comprising:

a receptacle including an engaging end, a cylindrical shell extending outwardly over said engaging end and being adapted to be retracted from said engaging end, a plurality of fingers formed in said shell at spaced intervals around the periphery thereof, said receptacle including means for outwardly biasing said plurality of fingers with relation to the center of said shell, each finger including a locking ridge and a cam ridge inwardly disposed thereon;

a sleeve being disposed around said receptacle, said sleeve being forwardly biased toward the engaging end of said receptacle and over said sleeve, said sleeve being extendable over the fingers for urging the fingers inwardly when biased in the forward movement and for locking the cam ridge of said fingers against the engaging end of said receptacle when said shell is retracted and said sleeve is biased forward; and

a plug being adapted to engage said receptacle and including a locking groove disposed around the periphery thereof for receiving the locking ridge of the fingers when being engaged with said receptacle when said sleeve is forwardly biased.

9. The connector as defined in claim fl and further including means for biasing said cylindrical sleeve towards the engaging end of said receptacle.

110 The connector as defined in claim 8 and further includllll ing a second shell disposed around said plug for receiving the extending end ofsaid first shell.

1]. The electrical connector as defined in claim 8 and further including:

a second cylindrical shell disposed around said plug for receiving the extending end of said first cylindrical shell between said second shell and said plug; and

means for urging the extended end of said first shell towards the engaging end of said plug and out of engagement with said first shell of said plug.

12. In an electrical connection apparatus:

a first member including an engaging end having a shoulder thereon, said first member including a cylindrical surface therearound;

a sleeve being slidably disposed around said first member and including a plurality of fingers formed around the periphery thereof and along the longitudinal axis, each finger including a locking ridge disposed on the inside thereof and a cocking ridge adjacent with said locking ridge on said fingers, said fingers being outwardly biased when said cocking ridge engages the shoulder on the engaging end of said first member, said sleeve being biased towards the engagin end of the firstmember; a second member inc udmg a receiving ridge around the periphery thereof and adapted to engage the locking ridge of said sleeve when said sleeve is slidably moved towards the engaging end of said first member and towards said second member; and

a locking sleeve disposed around said first sleeve and being biased in a forward position for forcing said outwardly biased fingers of said first sleeve into engagement with the locking ridge of said second member and for maintaining the fingers of said plurality outwardly biased when said cocking ridges on said plurality of fingers are wedged between the shoulder on said engaging end and said forwardly biased locking sleeve.

113. The combination as defined in claim 12 and further including spring means disposed around the surface of said-first member to urge said first sleeve towards the engaging end to effectively disengage the locking ridge of said fingers from the locking groove of said first member.

14. The combination as defined in claim R2 and further including spring means for biasing said locking sleeve in a forward position.

15. The combination as defined in claim M and further including an outer sleeve disposed around said second member and spaced therefrom to receive the first sleeve on said first member.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/131, 439/350, 285/316, 285/81, 439/488
International ClassificationH01R24/00, H01R24/02, H01R13/635, H01R13/633, H01R13/639
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/635
European ClassificationH01R13/635
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 13, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: G&H TECHNIOLOGY, INC., 1649 - 17TH STREET, SANTA M
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:AUTOMATION INDUSTRIES, INC., FORMERLY PCC;TECHNICAL INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF CA.;REEL/FRAME:004513/0924
Effective date: 19860114
Aug 27, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: AUTOMATION INDUSTRIES, INC., 500 WEST PUTNAM AVE.,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:G & H TECHNOLOGY, INC., A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:003903/0364
Effective date: 19810817