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Publication numberUS3595215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1971
Filing dateJul 7, 1969
Priority dateJul 7, 1969
Publication numberUS 3595215 A, US 3595215A, US-A-3595215, US3595215 A, US3595215A
InventorsMarvin L Wilkie, Archie F Phillips
Original AssigneeMarvin L Wilkie, Archie F Phillips
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magazine-type bow quiver
US 3595215 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Marvin L. Wilkie 8115 W. 62nd Ave., Arvada, Colo. 80002; Archie P. Phillips. 3330 Ames, Denver. Colo. 80212 [21) Appl. No. 839,311 [22] Filed July 7, I969 [45] Patented July 27, 1971 [54] MAGAZINE-TYPE BOW QUIVER 15 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S.Cl 124/52, 124/24, 224/1 [Sl] lnt.Cl F4lc 25/00 [50] Field of Search....., l24/24,4l. 45,22,23,52,53; LSD/1.5 A;224/l [56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,464,068 3/1949 Bear 124/24 3,114,485 [2/1963 Whiffen... 124/41 X 3,116,730 l/l964 Tingleyn 124/24 3,066,665 l2/l962 Reilly 124/52 X Primary Examiner- Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-William R. Browne Attorney-Ancel Wt Lewis, Jr

ABSTRACT: Quiver supporting a plurality of arrows on a bow with the arrows being rotated obliquely to one another about a common axis to separate the heads and fletched ends of adjacent arrows in a balanced array. The quiver comprises a support body including generally U-shaped slotted portions opening through opposite ends of the body with the slotted portions being reversely inclined in opposite directions at the ends of the body about a central fixed line to support the arrows in a stacked arrangement to one another. The terminal ends of the The remaining arrows are automatically advanced along the slotted portions to dispose another arrow in the discharge position each time one is removed.

PATENTED JIJLZ'! i9?! SHEEP 1 [1F 2 INVENTORS MARVIN L. WILKIE ARCH/E F. PHILLIPS PATENTED JUL27 I97! SHEET 2 [IF 2 MARVIN L. WlLK/E Y ARCHIE E PHILLIPS [X44 A TTORNE Y FIGJO MAGAZINE-TYPE BOW QUIVER This invention relates to a novel and improved magazinetype bow quiver for releasably supporting a plurality of arrows on a bow for a rapid successive movement into the shooting position on a bow.

Quivers which mount directly on a how are frequently referred to as bow quivers. This type of quiver affords several advantages over those which attach to the person rather than to the bow among which is the fact that game hunters may fire several arrows in succession without taking their eyes off the target whereby to enhance their chances of SIJCCCSS. Several bow quivers are available but typically they dispose the arrows either parallel or perpendicular to the bow and parallel to one another which results in a limitation of the number of arrows which can be supported without unbalancing the bow. Further these devices have not optimized the disposition of the arrow relative to the bow to provide the greatest ease and quickness of movement from a supported discharge position on the quiver to a shooting position on the bow.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a simple, durable and lightweight bow quiver.

Another object of this invention is to provide a bow quiver which will dispose a leading of the arrows for grasping from either side of the bow in a manner which will provide continuous movement from a quiver discharge position to a shooting position on the bow to facilitate rapid shooting of the arrows.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a bow quiver which will support an increased number of arrows than heretofore provided without contact between adjacent heads and fletched ends of the supported arrows without materially unbalancing the bow during usage.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel and improved bow quiver which will advance each arrow being carried in succession to a quiver discharge position where it will be readily accessible to the bowman for placement in the shooting position on the bow.

In accordance with the present invention there is provided a magazine-type bow'mounted quiver which disposes a plurality of arrows in a balanced array obliquely to one another preferably forwardly of the central area of the bow with their points down. A leading arrow extends diagonally across the bow. The quiver comprises a support body with end portions projecting from a common base; the end portions have generally U-shaped, arrow-receiving slots opening through opposite ends of the body which are twisted in opposite directions at the ends of the body about a fixed line located between the slots to incline in reverse directions to dispose the arrows in a stacked relationship with adjacent arrows twisted oblique to one another about a fixed line and each twisted sufficiently to space the heads and fletching of adjacent arrows apart. The slots turn outwardly along the body at their terminal ends to form a pair of discharge portions facing in opposite directions on opposite sides of the end members. A stop member located between the end members engages a side of the leading arrow when a downwardly directed force is applied to its fletched end so' that it pivots against the stop member and through the slot openings. An advance mechanism contained in the body yieldably urges the stack of arrows along the slot walls to automatically advance another of the arrows to the discharge position each time an arrow is removed.

The above and other objects. advantages and capabilities of the present invention will become more readily appreciated and understood from a consideration of the following detailed description when taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. I is a side elevational view showinga loaded bow quiver and bow assembly embodying features of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary elevational view showing the spacing between fletched ends of the arrows.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary rear elevational view of the assembly shown in FIG. 1 showing particularly the position of the leading arrow relative to the front and rear faces of the bow.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation view of the assembly shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevation view of the assembly shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation view of the assembly shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation view of the assembly viewing it from the opposite sides of that of FIGS. 1 and 3.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken along lines 8-8 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along lines 9-9 of FIG. 8 showing the advance mechanism extended without any arrows being loaded therein and.

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along lines 10-10 of FIG. 7 showing the resilient support of one arrow within the holder.

Referring now to the drawings the bow quiver identified generally by numeral 11 has a right-angle bracket 12 with screws 13 threaded through the bracket into the bow to fasten it to a central portion of a bow 14 which in a preferred position is forwardly thereof and above a hand grip portion 15 and also above the shooting position defined by horizontally disposed arrow-rest 16a and an upright pressure plate 16b.

The quiver I1 is shown as supporting a plurality of arrows 17 and broadly stated disposed the arrows with the points down forwardly of the central area of the bow and with a leading arrow 17a in a removal position in which it is shown as extending diagonally across the front of the bow with its midpoint being above the arrow rest 16a and with its fletched end just forwardly of the bow and to one side whereby downward and rearward pulling force on the fletched end releases the leading arrow from the quiver to drop into the arrow rest 16] as represented in dash lines at 1712. In this connection as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 6 one side edge of the quiver is disposed to the inside of or just clears the pressure plate 16b so it does not interfere with the launching of the arrow. Another of the arrows is then advanced to the discharge position each time one is removed so that they can be fired in rapid succession as described more fully hereafter.

The arrow quiver 11 comprises a support body which is somewhat channellike including a backwall portion 21 joined to spaced sidewall portions 22 and 23 and spaced shaped end wall portions 24 and 25. The end portions 24 and 25 which are provided with relatively deep and essentially U-shaped slots 26 and 27 respectively which open through opposite ends of the body and are sized to slidably receive and support a total of six arrows stacked one against another which are shown as extending across the front face of the bow. The slots 26 and 27 are inclined in opposite directions along intersecting planes having a fixed line designated 28 located midway between and centrally of the end portions 24 and 25 so that they incline in an opposite direction. Terminal end portions of the slots 24 and 25 are turned outwardly to form discharge portions receiving the leading arrow 17a and face in opposite directions and provide oppositely disposed slot openings 29 and 31 along the body in end walls 24 and 25, respectively, into which the arrows are inserted and out of which the arrows are discharged. Slots 26 and 27 may also be characterized as being reversely inclined and essentially in the shape of an inverted lazy I...

The outer slot wall at the terminal end thereof has an arcuate recess 32 facing the bottom of the slot which with the forces applied by the advance mechanism hereafter described serves to hold the leading arrow against premature release. A downturned terminal end surface 33 formed along the outer slot wall acts as a cam surface against which the leading arrow is slid in a downward movement in its discharge to .be described. Each of the slots 26 and 27 is preferably lined with a flexible or resilient liner 34 which resiliently engages the arrows and serves to reduce noise during their carriage therein.

This particular reversely inclined slotted support arrangement serves to slidably support the arrows in a stacked relationship along a fixed line with adjacent arrows being successively turned or rotated obliquely to one another at a slight angle about the fixed line or common axis 28 in a balanced array which may also be generally characterized as being disposed in a plane transformed by twisting a flat plane around a fixed plane. The degree of twist or rotation is sufficient to space the fietching an equal distance apart as best shown in FIG. 2 and also the broad heads an equal distance apart so that there is no contact therebetween and thereby eliminates noise which would otherwise be caused by rubbing against one another which would be troublesome particularly to hunters of game.

To advance the arrows along the slots 26 and 27 there is provided a plunger 41 and a spring member 42 housed in the channellike body with the plunger compressing the spring when the arrows are loaded therein and directly engaging the trailing arrow. The spring is preferably of conical shape which will flatten or compress to a single-convolution thickness when the quiver is loaded as best shown in H0. 7. This conical shaped spring serves to reduce the depth of the body. A pad 43 is provided centrally of the plunger to engage the trailing arrow to make it pivot smoothly as it advances from the trailing to the leading position. i

A stop member 44 with an essentially semispherical-shaped head is mounted on sidewall 22 in close proximity to the side of the leading arrow 170 against which the leading arrow is moved in its pivotal action out of the slot openings 29 and 31 as best shown in FIG. 3. The stop member 44 is located relative to the slots 26 and 27 to facilitate a coordinated equal movement or uniform advance of the leading movement out of the slots. The location of stop member 44 is slightly closer to the lower slot 27 than upper slot 26 to achieve uniform movement out ofthe slots. Stop member 44 also serves to hold the plunger in the body together with a second stop member 45 on the other wall 23 when the body is empty. in the movement of the leading arrow 170 from the quiver the arrow is grasped at its fletched end by gripping the nock of the arrow and it is pulled downwardly. The sides of the arrow are moved against the camming surfaces 33 and compress the spring 42 slightly and the center of the arrow bears or pivots against the stop member 44 and then passes through the slotted discharge openings 33 and 34 and falls directly into the arrow rest 16a in a continuous downward movement.

The arrangement of the inclined slots above described is for a right-hand or right side mount. For the left-hand mount the slot arrangement will be reversed to incline the leading arrow across the bow in the reverse direction but it is apparent that the stacked oblique arrangement of the arrows will remain the same so that the basic concepts may be used for either leftor right-hand quiver mounts. From the foregoing it is apparent that the quiver body and arrow stack therein even with six arrows being supported does not unduly project to one side of the bow so as to unduly unbalance it during firing and it is readily adaptable to a unit supporting fewer arrows such as four or three for more applications making the width even shorter. The quiver is readily attached to the bow and will serve to transport the arrows with a minimum of noise without fletching or head contact.

Although the present invention has been described with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure has been made only by way of example and that changes in details of structure and system components may be made without departing from the spirit thereof.

What I claim is:

l. A bow quiver for mounting a plurality of arrows on a bow comprising an arrow support body means having slotted portions lying in planes parallel to each other and opening through opposite ends of the body means with each of said slotted portions being closed at one end and being open at the other end, said open ends providing arrow removal ends, said slotted portions being reversely inclined along intersecting plates to dispose said arrow removal ends at oppositely disposed positions for releasably holding a plurality of arrows in a stack with the arrows being successively rotated obliquely to one another about a common axis and a leading arrow in a removal position, whereby a force applied at said leading arrow releasably removes it from said support body means and advancing means to automatically move another of said arrows to the removal position of said slotted portion each time a leading arrow is removed.

2. A bow quiver as set forth in claim I wherein said support body means is a generally channellike member with arrowreceiving spaced end portions having said slotted portions provided by relatively deep, generally U-shaped slots inclined in opposite directions about a fixed line midway between said end portions to support the arrows in a stack.

3. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 2 wherein said slots turn outwardly in opposite directions at their terminal ends to form slot openings along opposite sides of the support body on means joining the end portions.

4. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 1 wherein said advancing means includes a spring and plunger assembly disposed between walls of the body support means joining the end portions, said assembly resiliently urging the arrows toward the arrow removal position.

5. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 1 including resilient slot wall edges slidably engaging the arrows supported therein.

6. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 1 including a stop member disposed on the arrow support body means in close proximity to one side ofthe leading arrow against which a central portion of the leading arrow is moved so as to pivot the arrow out of the support body.

7. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 1 wherein each of said slotted portion is defined by a pair of spaced parallel slot walls with the slot wall pairs of each end being inclined in opposite directions.

8. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 1 wherein said slotted portions are in the shape of an inverted lazy L to stack the arrows one on another and position them at approximately equally spaced intervals between the ends of adjacent arrows wherein said positioned at approximately equally spaced intervals between the end of adjacent arrows.

9. A magazine-type quiver for a bow comprising a plurality of arrows, an arrow support body having a base, a pair of spaced upstanding sidewall portions joined to the base and a pair of spaced upstanding end wall portions joined to the base, said end wall portions having generally U-shaped slots opening through the ends ofthe body, each of said slots being closed at one end and being open at the other end, said open ends providing arrow removal ends, and said slots being reversely inclined along intersecting planes to dispose said arrow removal ends in oppositely disposed positions about a fixed line midway between the end wall portions, a plurality of arrows in a stacked relation obliquely to one another with the heads and fletched ends of adjacent arrows being spaced apart, the terminal ends of said slots being turned out in opposite directions along the body to define slot openings along opposite sides thereof, a leading arrow disposed in a removal position in the turned out slots adjacent the slot openings, a stop mounted on one sidewall portion having a rounded surface disposed in close proximity to one side of the leading arrow whereby a pulling force applied at one end of the leading arrow pivots said arrow against said rounded surface to remove it from the slot openings, and a force applying means in the body resiliently urging the stack of arrows along the slots to automatically move each successive arrow to the removal position each time a leading arrow is removed from the slot.

10. A magazine type quiver as set forth in claim 9 wherein the one of said turned out slot walls includes a recessed portion generally at the slot of opening in which the leading arrow is releasably held by the force applying means and said recessed portion.

11. A bow quiver for supporting a plurality of arrows on said bow, said bow quiver comprising a plurality of arrows, a support body means with slotted portions opening through opposite ends of the body and offset one from another for slidably receiving and releasingly gripping a central portion of each of said arrows and for positioning the plurality of arrows diagonally across the back of the bow with the fletched end of the leading arrow in spaced proximity to one side of the bow whereby a pulling force applied at a fletched end of the lead arrow removes said lead arrow from the support body means so that said lead arrow arrow may drop into the firing position on a bow in one continuous movement.

12. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 11 whereby said lead arrow is supported in a position inclined rearwardly from top to bottom on a bow.

13. A bow quiver as set forth in claim 11 including means to automatically advance each successive arrow to a lead position each time a lead arrow is removed.

14. A quiver for a bow as set forth in claim 11 wherein said arrows are disposed in a stack extending laterally across the back of a bow with said stack of arrows being successively rotated obliquely to one another about a common axis whereby to separate the fletched ends and heads of adjacent arrows.

15. A quiver for a bow as set forth in claim 14 wherein said arrows are successively advanced along the common axis to the lead position.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2464068 *Jan 16, 1946Mar 8, 1949Fred B BearBow quiver
US3066665 *Feb 12, 1959Dec 4, 1962Robert A ReillySeparable holding or supporting means
US3114485 *Nov 12, 1958Dec 17, 1963Lawrence C WhiffenBow quiver
US3116730 *Jun 12, 1961Jan 7, 1964Lewis O TingleyQuiver assembly for bow attachment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4522187 *Apr 25, 1983Jun 11, 1985Tafel William GArchery quiver and method
US4541403 *Apr 15, 1983Sep 17, 1985Deblois CharlesBow-mounted quiver of the magazine type
US4823762 *Jul 23, 1987Apr 25, 1989Pugh Gregory EArrow holding and loading device for archery bows
US4823764 *Jul 16, 1987Apr 25, 1989Knaack Randy LBow mounted quiver
US4955355 *Apr 10, 1989Sep 11, 1990Pugh Gregory EArrow holding and loading device for archery bows
US5107819 *Sep 6, 1990Apr 28, 1992Pugh Gregory EArrow holding and loading device for archery bows
US5280777 *Apr 27, 1992Jan 25, 1994Pugh-Zweng Enterprises, Inc.Arrow holding and loading device for archery bows
US7461647 *Jan 31, 2006Dec 9, 2008Slinkard Michael DArrow holder for loading and shooting multiple arrows in succession
US20110297135 *Jun 7, 2011Dec 8, 2011Bugeja Thomas JMutli arrow holder and rest
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/52, 124/25.5, 224/916
International ClassificationF41B5/06
Cooperative ClassificationF41B5/066, Y10S224/916
European ClassificationF41B5/06D