Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3595230 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1971
Filing dateJul 25, 1968
Priority dateJul 25, 1968
Publication numberUS 3595230 A, US 3595230A, US-A-3595230, US3595230 A, US3595230A
InventorsKaterndahl Dean R, Suyeoka George M
Original AssigneeAbbott Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intravenous catheter placement unit with tubular guide sheath
US 3595230 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,463,152 8/1969 Sorenson .Patented George M. Suyeoka C g Dean R. Katerdahl, Wheaton, both 01,111. 747,502

July 25, 1968 July 27, 1971 Abbott Laboratories Chicago, 111.

Inventors Appl. No. Filed Assignee INTRAVENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT WITH TUBULAR GUIDE SHEATII 7 Claims, 13 Drawing Figs.

U.S.Cl l28/2l4.4, 128/348, 206/632 Int.Cl A6lm 5/00 Field of Search 128/2144, 221, 348, 349, DIG. 16; 206/632 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,185,152 5/1965 Ring l28/2l4.4 3,262,448 7/1966 816 ,6161." 128/2144 3,444,860 5/1969 Harrell 128/349 3,459,184 8/1969 Ring 128/214.4 3,323,523 6/1967 Scislowiczetal 128/2l4.4 FORElGN PATENTS Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluck Attorney-Sherman and Shalloway ABSTRACT: A catheter placement unit including a catheter shield with a catheter and needle positioned therein and the catheter shield comprising a flexible tubular hollow body having its distal end closed by a frictionally engaged end plug and having a slot of varying width extending through its distal end to a point adjacent but not through its proximal end for guiding the catheter and needle preparatory to and during venipuncture.

PATENTEU m2? 197;

sum 1 OF 2 FIG. 7 6 8 lo I I I aw-1|: In I hlbll DEAN R. KATERNDAHL GEORGE SUYSOKA PATENTEO JIJL2 7 m:

SHEU 2 [IF 2 INVENTORS DEAN R. KATERNDAHL GEORGE SUYBOKA BY I y ATTORNEY INTRAVENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT WITH TUBULAR GUIDE SHEATI-I BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the use of long intravenous catheters, problems have been encountered in providing a catheter which can be safely and easily positioned in a vein. Modern practice has tended toward the use of a concentric needle and catheter assembly which is inserted into a vein whereby the catheter may be advanced into the vein after venipuncture while the needle is withdrawn from the vein. Two general types of concentric intravenous catheters have evolved, the first type being known as the needle outside, and the second type being known as the needle inside."

Turning to a consideration of needle-inside type long intravenous catheters, the primary disadvantages are the flexibility of a long slender needle and the difficulty in maintaining the sterility of the catheter. These disadvantages are somewhat self-explanatory, but a further consideration is desirable to appreciate the novelty of this invention.

When it is desirable to use long flexible needles in order that the catheter be properly placed in the vein, these needles must be handled at a hub provided at one end. By grasping one-end of the needle, accurate positioning of the opposite end is extremely difficult and the flexibility of the needle further makes the needle difiicult to control. To solve this problem various devices have been heretofore used to grasp the needle at an intermediate point, but this increases the possibility of contamination.

An additional disadvantage is the danger of contamination involved in inserting a manually manipulated instrument into the body; this problem is increased when the needle-catheter is grasped intermediate its length.

Heretofore, the sterility problem attendant with the use of long needles was dealt with by using an aseptic venipuncture technique. Also, the sterility has been improved by packaging the catheters in plastic envelopes and by using various flexible sheaths to surround the catheter during venipuncture. These devices are not entirely satisfactory since the catheter and needle must be moved relative to one another after venipuncture and the flexible sheaths inhibit the advancement of the catheter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention broadly relates to catheters of the needle-inside type. More specifically, the invention relates to a combined catheter shield and catheter placement unit adapted for use with catheters of the needle-inside type. Although this invention relates particularly to the needle-inside type, it also solves many problems which are common to the needle-outside type.

The present invention treats the primary disadvantages by combining the previously used devices in a novel manner. That is, an enclosing sheath with a supporting structure intermediate the catheter length is provided wherein the resulting novel structure allows movement of the catheter and needle either simultaneously or separately and during positioning of the catheter, and wherein the catheter can be readily freed of the needle and sheath after positioning.

Briefly, the present invention provides a flexible but rigid tubular sheath with slots which slots receive fins attached to a needle and a catheter enclosed in said sheath which are to be grasped to move the needle and the catheter. A series of slots is provided in the sheath which will lock the needle in place in the sheath and allow advancement of the catheter until the catheter is completely free of the sheath and the needle. Additionally, the sheath is provided with an end plug to support the needle and catheter during venipuncture which plug is freely removable from the catheter when the catheter is free of the sheath.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of this invention to provide a catheter sheath which maintains the sterility of a catheter and needle assembly, which supports the catheterneedle assembly during venipuncture and which is automatically separated from said catheter when the catheter is advanced into position in the vein.

Still another object is to provide a catheter placement unit wherein a needle and catheter may be moved to a venipuncture position and the catheter may thereafter be advanced to automatically separate the catheter from the needle and sheath.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from a reference to the drawings and the descriptions thereof. In the drawings, like numerals designate like elements and in the drawings:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side view partly in section showing the catheter placement unit ofthis invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the catheter placement unit of this invention;

FIG. 3 is an end view of an end plug according to this invention;

FIG. 4 is a side view of an end plug according to this invention;

FIG. 5 is a side view of a catheter with appurtenances according to this invention;

FIG. 6 is a side view of a needle with appurtenances according to this invention;

FIG. 7 is a view of a catheter with appurtenances in place in a patients vein;

FIG. 8 is a partial top'view of a shield according to this invention;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view along lines 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a partial side view of a needle according to this invention;

FIG. 1 l is a sectional view along lines 1 l-l 1 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a partial side view in partial section of a catheter according to this invention;

FIG. 13 is an end view along lines l3-13 of FIG. 12.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, the novel shield and the intravenous catheter is shown as comprising the following major elements:

Z-shield 4-end plug 6-catheter S-catheter fin l0-catheter hub I 2-needle l4-needle hub IG-needle thumb tab As a result of the engagement of catheter 6 and needle 12 in aperture 22, they are supported and guided by end plug 4 when said catheter and needle are slidably moved therethrough. This is important since the long flexible needle is thereby steadied and rendered manipulatable without danger of contamination or breakage during venipuncturev A correlative advantage is the fact that the end of the shield 2 containing end plug 4 aids in maintaining the integrity of the entire device during storage and shipment.

Returning to FIG. 1, the tubular shield 2 is seen to completely enclose the catheter 6 and has extended tubular portion 3 connected to extended tubular portion 7 of lesser diameter than tubular portion 3 by tapered tubular portion 5. The shield extends from the distal end, i.e., the catheter end engaged by end plug 4 to the proximal end, i.e., the end of catheter 6 which is provided with catheter hub 10. The catheter hub 10 carries a catheter fin 8 for a purpose to be described more fully hereinafter. Needle 12 is concentrically arranged within catheter 6 in the usual needle inside catheter arrangement. As seen in FIG. 1, the needle tip 24 extends beyond the catheter at its distal end. Needle 12 has a needle hub 14 with an upstanding needle thumb tab 16 at its proximal end. Needle hub 14 is engaged within catheter hub 10. The open end of needle hub 14 is closed by an air filter 18. This filter is a hollow tubular element having one end closed at flange 19. Flange 19 contains a fiberglass mesh component which allows air to be expelled from the hollow needle 12 through the hollow needle hub 10, however, the structure of the mesh is such as to prevent flow of blood therethrough when flashback occurs during venipuncture. In order to accommodate the upstanding catheter fin 8 and needle thumb tab 16, the shield 2 is slit longitudinally as is best seen in FIGS. 2 and 8.

In FIG. 2, reference numeral 52 generally designates a series of slots of varying width in one side of shield 2. Reference 26 designates a small slot formed in one side of tubular plastic shield 2; small slot 26 extends from the distal end of the shield 2 which end carries end plug 4 to a point about half the length of the shield. The small slot 26 is normally urged in a closed position due to the inherent resiliency of the plastic shield 2. As the small slot 26 continues into the second half of the shield length a first tapered neck 27 is provided and then an intermediate slot 28; next a first large slot 29 is provided followed by a second tapered neck 30 leading to a second large slot 31 which extends almost to the end of the shield. This second large slot 31 is followed by a third tapered neck 32 and then a third large slot 33. The function of the slots is to allow controlled movement of catheter fin 8 and needle thumb tab 16 which thereby move the catheter 6 and needle 12 respectively within the shield 2. To understand the purpose of the slots, it is necessary to consider the overall operation and use of the instrument.

In practice, a catheter is inserted into a vein for the purpose of inserting a treating fluid into the body. In accordance with conventional needle-inside catheter practice, a needle is concentrically arranged within the catheter so that venipuncture can be made and the catheter can be moved forward while the needle is removed. When the catheter is in place and the needle removed, administration equipment is connected to the catheter hub. Now, the improvement of this invention can be appreciated. The shield enables the assembled needle and catheter to be manipulated and handled without contamination, and the end plug provides a stabilizing force intermediate the needle length. Ofcourse, the shield 2 and end plug 4 must be removed after venipuncture to enable the easy and efficient administration of treating fluid. In using the novel placement unit of this invention, the needle thumb tab 16 initially extends from shield 2 through the third large slot 33. Prior to use, needle thumb tab 16 is held in place by the third tapered neck 32, and air filter 18 extends from the shield 2. Also catheter fin 8 initially extends through the second large slot 31. In this initial state, catheter hub 10 engages needle hub 14 so that movement of one fin or tab causes movement of the other. Preparatory to venipuncture, the user pushes the needle thumb tab 16 forward through third tapered neck 32 into second large slot 31; thereby forcing the entire assembled needle and catheter forward, and causing the needle tip 24 to slightly extend from the distal end of the shield. Thereafter, catheter fin 8 is moved into intermediate slot 28 and needle thumb tab 16 is positioned in first large slot 29, by pushing the needle thumb tab 16 forward through second tapered neck 30. This may be accomplished in a single movement. At this point it is to be noted that needle thumb tab 16 has a width which is approximately the same as first and second large slots 29 and 31. The needle thumb tab 16 is able to move through second tapered neck 30 because it is tapered and as it moves therethrough the resilient walls of shield 2 are spread apart. This is the mechanism also for pushing the catheter fin through those slots that are not as wide as said catheter wing. However, once needle thumb tab 16 reaches first large slot 29 it is confined by the relatively squared edges of said slot and can only be moved by considerable effort in forcing the shield sides apart. Thus, needle thumb tab 16 is not intended to be subsequently moved once it is positioned in first large slot 29. As noted above, when needle thumb tab 16 is positioned in first large slot 29, the catheter fin 8 is simultaneously positioned in intermediate slot 28 and the concentric needle and catheter are moved further through aperture 22 in end plug 4 so that about onethird the length of said catheter and needle now extend from shield 2. Now venipuncture may be accomplished with the needle steadied by end plug 4, and the catheter may be advanced after the needle penetrates into the vein. The advance of the catheter is accomplished by grasping catheter fin 8 with the fingers of one hand and using the other hand to hold the shield 2. For maximum efficiency the other hand may engage shield 2 adjacent first large slot 29 thereby ensuring that the needle will remain stationary due to the engagement of the needle wing 16 in first large slot 29, but this is not generally required since first large slot 29 closely engages needle thumb tab 16 and immobilizes the needle. Continuing in the description, catheter fin 8 is forced forward through first tapered neck 27 into small slot 26. Since the needle 12 is now held immobilized in the shield the catheter 6 will be advanced into the vein and separated from the needle 12. In order to free the catheter and catheter hub from shield 2, the end plug 4 is adapted to be pushed out of the shield and to fall free of the catheter, thus leaving the catheter in the vein and the catheter hub free for attachment to administration equipment as seen in FIG. 7.

The end plug is designed so as to be freely removable from the catheter 6 after it is forced out of the end of the shield 2. The construction of the end plug is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. End plug 4 comprises a first half 35 and a second half 37 attached by a strip 39. First half 35 is provided with a lug 41 and second half 37 is provided with a cavity 43 aligned with lug 41. When the halves are placed in abutting relationship, lug 41 engages cavity 43 to prevent relative movement of the halves (see FIG. 3). Since the two halves are connected by resilient strap 39, they normally are forced apart as shown in FIG. 4 due to the resiliency of strip 39. Therefore, unless some restraining force is applied to the halves to force the halves into the position of FIG. 3, they will assume the position of FIG. 4. The advantage of this characteristic is that the end plug 4 when positioned in shield 2 forms an integral plug, but as soon as it is pushed out, it flies apart and falls free of catheter 6.

The details of construction of the catheter can be seen in FIGS. 5, 7, 12 and 13. As above-described, FIG. 7 shows the catheter in place in a vein. The catheter 6 comprises a hollow transparent or translucent plastic tube of any suitable length. The plastic catheter may comprise a length of extruded plasticized polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene or other synthetic plastic. One typically used catheter of the intermediate length is approximately 5 inches long, although the length can vary greatly and is in no way critical to the success of this invention. At the proximal end, the catheter 6 is provided with a catheter hub 10 having a catheter fin 8. The distal end should preferably be tapered to facilitate insertion. The catheter hub and tin are molded as an integral unit of a plastic such as acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, polypropylene or equivalent plastics. The catheter hub 10 is formed in a tiered arrangement with sections of smaller and larger diameter. Referring to FIG. 12, a connection section 38 of smallest diameter is seen to form a connection between catheter hub and catheter 6. At this connection section 38 the catheter I and catheter hub may be joined by any suitable method. For

example, the said hub can be molded around the catheter end to form a weld or a solvent may be used to tackify the plastic and form a bond. A tapering section 40 is provided adjacent the connection section 38 of small diameter. Tapen'ng section 40 tapers both internally and externally. Large section 42 is also provided with a slight internal taper to engage and guide another section of the needle hub 14. A flange or luer lock 45 is provided at the proximal end of the catheter hub 10, which flange serves to facilitate connection with administration equipment, not shown.

The needle 12, needle hub 14, and needle thumb tab 16 are shown in FIGS. 6, 10, and II. The needle 12 is a hollow metal needle of conventional construction which may be formed of stainless steel or equivalent materials. At the distal end of needle 12 a needle point 24 is provided with a beveled or lancet point having any suitable geometry, e.g. an oval or diamond shape, in the plane of the bevel. At the proximal end of the .needle 12 a needle hub 14 is provided which may be formed of molded plastic and attached to the needle junction at 46 with an epoxy resin in a conventional manner, or by swagging or welding. The needle thumb tab 16 is molded in one piece with the needle hub. Following junction 46 is enlarged section 48 of needle hub 14 which engages inside luer taper 42 of catheter hub 10. Following enlarged section 48 of needle hub 14 is flange 50 molded integrally with needle hub 14 and thumb tab 16 and which keeps the needle assembly centered in shield 2.

The shield 2 is shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. FIG. 9 shows that the shield 2 is a tubular hollow element with a series of slots 52 of varying width as explained with reference to FIG. 2, extending through substantially all of the shield length. The series of slots 52 extends along an axis parallel to the axial axis of the shield 2. The tubular shield may be molded or extruded using plastics such as polyethylene, propionate, polypropylene or equivalent materials. The slots may be formed by stamping out the extruded tube or molded directly into a molded tube. When the slots are stamped out the resiliency of the plastic forces the tube to the position of FIGS. 2 and 8. Turning to FIG. 8 a top view of the shield showing the varying width of the slots is illustrated. Small slot 26 extends through about half the length of the shield and ends in first tapered neck 27 which neck leads to intermediate slot 28. Intermediate slot 28 communicates with a pair of squared shoulders of first large slot 29, and slot 29 communicates through another pair of squared shoulders with second large slot 31 through second tapered neck 30. Next, third tapered neck 32 connecis with third large slot 33. In the distal end the natural resiliency of the plastic must be utilized to close the shield.

The purpose of the slots has been described above, but a general review of the manner of using the novel catheter assembly is considered warranted. The entire assembly which may be packaged in a sealed envelope to insure sterility during shipment is initially received in the assembled relationship shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Upon removing the outer protective envelope, the device is prepared for venipuncture by pushing the needle thumb tab 16 with the thumb forward. This forces needle thumb tab 16 past retaining third tapered neck 32 and into second large slot 31. Now needle thumb tab 16 is grasped and moved forward to the dotted line shown in FIG. I. In this position the needle thumb tab 16 is engaged in first large slot 29. Since said tab 16, needle hub 14, and flange 50 are molded in a single piece, the entire needle with appurtenances is thereby moved forward and a further portion of the needle extends through end plug 4. Additionally, since the needle and appurtenances are engaged with the catheter and catheter appurtenances the described movement of the needle simultaneously moves the catheter and catheter hub forward until the catheter fin is positioned, as shown in dotted lines in FIG. I, in

intermediate slot 28. Now the needle is inserted into a vein thereby simultaneously inserting the concentric catheter. venipuncture is accomplished by gripping the entire assembly and pushing the extending needle and catheter through the skin into the vein. Now the catheter can be moved relative to the needle and shield while the needle remains stationary in the shield by pushing the catheter fin 8 forward. Continued movement of the catheter pushes out end plug 4 when catheter hub 10 abuts said end plug, thereby allowing the catheter 8 and catheter hub 10 to be completely removed from engagement with the needle 12 and shield 2. Since the end plug 4 falls away, the catheter is entirely free and can be taped to the skin and connected to administration equipment. As seen in FIG. 7, the fin 8 lies on the skin and tape is applied to the skin across said fin.

While certain illustrative terms have been used in describing this invention, no limitation is to be implied from the terminology or examples given herein.

Having described this invention in full, terms, what We claim is:

l. A catheter placement unit comprising a catheter having a fin extending therefrom;

a needle movably disposed inside said catheter and having a tab extending therefrom; and

a tubular shield slidably housing said catheter and said needle, said shield having slot means therein including a first narrow slot, and a second slot wider than said first slot and having shoulders communicating with said first slot,

said catheter fin and said needle tab extending through said slot means to a position external of said shield, said catheter fin having a width less than the width of said second slot and movable from said second slot to said first slot, and said needle tab having a width to abut said shoulders of said second slot whereby said needle tab is prevented from movement from said second slot to said first slot.

2. The invention as recited in claim 1 wherein said slot means includes a third slot, said shoulders in said second slot include a first pair of squared shoulders, said second slot has a second pair of squared shoulders, and a tapered neck communicates with said second pair of squared shoulders in said second slot and said third slot whereby said needle tab may be moved into said second slot from said third slot via said tapered neck and confined therein by said first and second pairs of squared shoulders.

3. The invention as recited in claim 2 wherein said shield has an open distal end, and said first, second, and third slots are disposed in said shield in consecutive, longitudinal alignment from said distal end.

4. A catheter placement unit comprising a catheter having a proximal end and a tin extending radially from said proximal end;

a needle slidably disposed in said catheter having a proximal end extending beyond said proximal end of said catheter and a tab extending radially from said proximal end of said needle; and

shield means including a flexible hollow tubular body enclosing said catheter and said needle and having an open distal end, a removable end plug frictionally secured in said distal end of said body having a bore extending therethrough receiving said needle and said catheter, and guide means in said body to guide movement of said catheter fin and said needle tab,

said guide means including first slot means communicating with said distal end of said body and having a first width, and second slot means communicating with said first slot means and having a second width greater than said first width, said first and second slot means being consecutively longitudinally arranged in said body from said dista end, and

said catheter fin and said needle tab extending through said guide means to a position external of said body, said catheter fin having a width less than said second width of clear, and concise said second slot means and movable to said first slot means from said second slot means, and said needle tab having a width substantially equal to said second width of said second slot means whereby said needle tab is confined in said second slot means.

5. The invention as recited in claim 4 wherein said end plug includes a first half, a second half and a resilient strip interconnecting said first and second halves and normally forcing said first and second halves apart whereby said first and second halves are held together when frictionally secured in said distal end of said body and are moved apart when said end plug is pushed out of said body by said catheter fin to fall free from said catheter.

6. The invention as recited in claim 4 wherein said guide means includes third slot means in communication with said second slot means, and said catheter fin and said needle tab have first positions extending through said third slot means and are movable to second positions through said third slot means wherein said needle tab is confined in said second slot means and said catheter fin is in position to be moved through said first slot means to said distal end of said body.

7. The invention as recited in claim 6 wherein said second slot means has squared edges, and said third slot means has a first neck therein to define an area for maintaining said needle tab in said first position and communicates with said second slot means through a second tapered neck.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3185152 *Jun 19, 1962May 25, 1965Sorenson Res CorpIntravenous catheter placement unit and method of use
US3262448 *Nov 6, 1963Jul 26, 1966Sorenson Res CorpIntravenous catheter placement unit
US3323523 *Nov 18, 1964Jun 6, 1967Abbott LabIntravenous catheter assembly with divisible needle sheath portions
US3444860 *Jun 6, 1966May 20, 1969Harrell Osmah EAseptic catheter assembly with holder introducer
US3459184 *Nov 4, 1966Aug 5, 1969Voys Inc LeIntravenous catheter placement unit
US3463152 *Jun 8, 1966Aug 26, 1969Sorenson Research CorpCatheter placement unit
GB624269A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3844292 *Jun 9, 1972Oct 29, 1974Medtronic IncIntravascular lead assembly
US3861395 *Sep 25, 1973Jan 21, 1975Taniguchi TokusoAutomated catheter
US3898993 *Sep 17, 1974Aug 12, 1975Taniguchi TokusoLubricated catheter
US4170993 *Mar 13, 1978Oct 16, 1979Marcial AlvarezSliding I.V. needle carrier assembly
US4177809 *Sep 15, 1977Dec 11, 1979Warner-Lambert CompanyIntravenous catheter apparatus and method
US4327735 *Oct 22, 1980May 4, 1982Cordis CorporationCatheter assembly
US4464171 *Mar 29, 1982Aug 7, 1984Garwin Mark JIntravascular insertion apparatus and method
US4697573 *Apr 15, 1985Oct 6, 1987Iabp CorporationBalloon assembly adapted for facilitating insertion in a vessel
US4728322 *Feb 5, 1986Mar 1, 1988Menlo Care, Inc.Adjustable catheter assembly
US4834708 *Mar 31, 1987May 30, 1989George PillariPuncture needle assembly
US4865589 *Aug 20, 1987Sep 12, 1989Ludwig SimmetInstrument for the transfer of materials such as sperm and embryos
US4901707 *Mar 12, 1987Feb 20, 1990Iabp CorporationPrepackaged intra-aortic balloon assembly with holder, and method of using same
US4955863 *Jun 12, 1989Sep 11, 1990Menlo Care, Inc.Adjustable catheter assembly
US5007901 *Sep 12, 1990Apr 16, 1991Shields Jack WIntravenous catheter insertion device
US5019049 *Feb 20, 1990May 28, 1991Haining Michael LIntravenous catheter and insertion device
US5024665 *May 11, 1990Jun 18, 1991Hemedix International, Inc.Composite catheter assembly
US5112311 *Jul 30, 1990May 12, 1992David S. UtterbergGuarded winged needle assembly
US5116323 *Jan 22, 1991May 26, 1992Becton, Dickinson And CompanyArterial catheter
US5135502 *Mar 13, 1990Aug 4, 1992Medfusion Inc.Solid introducer for catheter to a port and method of use
US5176650 *Feb 10, 1992Jan 5, 1993Haining Michael LIntravenous catheter and insertion device
US5215525 *Sep 29, 1992Jun 1, 1993Sturman Warren MSafety casing for intravenous catheter needle
US5242427 *Nov 4, 1991Sep 7, 1993Ethicon, Inc.Surgical instrument forming a trocar
US5266072 *Sep 21, 1992Nov 30, 1993Utterberg David SGuarded winged needle assembly
US5279588 *Jan 30, 1992Jan 18, 1994Pio NicolettiDevice for protecting against accidental butterfly needle punctures
US5312359 *Dec 1, 1992May 17, 1994Wallace Henry GIntravenous cannula insertion assembly with protective shield
US5312361 *Aug 10, 1992May 17, 1994Zadini Filiberto PAutomatic cannulation device
US5356390 *Sep 30, 1993Oct 18, 1994Becton, Dickinson And CompanyCatheter introducer assembly
US5366441 *Sep 28, 1993Nov 22, 1994Becton, Dickinson And CompanyCatheter introducer assembly with guidewire
US5433703 *Feb 18, 1994Jul 18, 1995Utterberg; David S.Guarded winged needle assembly
US5507728 *Nov 22, 1994Apr 16, 1996Erskine; Timothy J.Peristaltic interlumenar device advances
US5683370 *Nov 21, 1996Nov 4, 1997Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5718239 *Jun 21, 1996Feb 17, 1998Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMethod of activating a needle assembly having a telescoping shield
US5893845 *Jun 21, 1996Apr 13, 1999Becton Dickinson & CompanyTelescoping needle shield
US5913848 *Jun 6, 1996Jun 22, 1999Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5916208 *Nov 21, 1996Jun 29, 1999Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5957893 *Sep 8, 1998Sep 28, 1999Becton Dickinson & Co.Hard tip over-the needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US6475190 *Jan 23, 2001Nov 5, 2002Ispg, Inc.Needle assembly including a retractable sheath
US6508790Oct 6, 2000Jan 21, 2003William K. LawrenceVascular access sheath
US6623461 *Mar 15, 2002Sep 23, 2003Becton, Dickinson And CompanyForward shielding safety device
US6632201Nov 17, 1999Oct 14, 2003Baxter International Inc.Locking needle protector
US6808510Aug 28, 2000Oct 26, 2004C.R Bard, Inc.Multi-lumen catheter and tip configurations for use therewith
US6939331 *May 17, 2002Sep 6, 2005Kabushiki Kaisha TopWing-like needle protector
US6984223Jun 7, 2002Jan 10, 2006Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedle safety device
US6997913Dec 19, 2003Feb 14, 2006Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedle safety device
US7048718 *Sep 27, 2000May 23, 2006Jms Co., LtdWinged injection needle having needle covering means
US7060055Jul 28, 2003Jun 13, 2006Becton Dickinson And CompanyForward shielding safety device
US7229434 *Nov 17, 2004Jun 12, 2007Hsien-Tsung WangSafety non-coring needle
US7285110Jun 10, 2003Oct 23, 2007P. Rowan Smith, Jr.Retractable hypodermic safety syringe
US7566327Jul 11, 2003Jul 28, 2009Fenwal, Inc.Needle protector
US7615034Jun 24, 2004Nov 10, 2009C. R. Bard, Inc.Multi-lumen catheter with protective sheath
US7715918Oct 18, 2006May 11, 2010University Of CincinnatiMuscle energy converter with smooth continuous tissue interface
US7753837Dec 8, 2005Jul 13, 2010The University Of CincinnatiPower system for a heart actuation device
US7942826Jun 6, 2006May 17, 2011Nuvasive, Inc.Insulated pedicle access system and related methods
US7967798Oct 22, 2003Jun 28, 2011Cook Medical Technologies LlcIntroducer apparatus with eversible sleeve
US8052753Jan 9, 2006Nov 8, 2011University Of CincinnatiProsthetic anchor and method of making same
US8123728Apr 26, 2010Feb 28, 2012Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Antimicrobial agent delivery system
US8235944 *Feb 4, 2010Aug 7, 2012Morteza GharibMedical device for placement of continuous regional anesthesia catheters
US8784330May 17, 2011Jul 22, 2014Nu Vasive, Inc.Insulated pedicle access system and related methods
US20100210997 *Feb 4, 2010Aug 19, 2010Morteza GharibMedical Device for Placement of Continuous Regional Anesthesia Catheters
US20110295218 *Nov 6, 2009Dec 1, 2011Novo Nordisk A/SBended injection needle
US20140005613 *Jul 26, 2011Jan 2, 2014Steerable Instruments BvbaCapillary tube assembly
USRE43473Jan 9, 2008Jun 12, 2012Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNeedle safety device
EP0258542A1 *May 30, 1987Mar 9, 1988B. Braun Melsungen AGPuncture garniture
EP0459954A1 *May 9, 1991Dec 4, 1991Ethicon S.P.A.One-way intravenous catheter with needle guard
EP0475857A1 *Aug 14, 1991Mar 18, 1992Hospal IndustrieNeedle assembly for medical use
EP0545671A1 *Dec 1, 1992Jun 9, 1993Smiths Industries PlcNeedle protector
EP0558162A2 *Sep 29, 1989Sep 1, 1993David S. UtterbergGuarded needle assembly
WO1990003196A1 *Sep 29, 1989Apr 5, 1990David S UtterbergGuarded winged needle assembly
WO2002058993A1 *Jan 18, 2002Aug 1, 2002Ispg IncNeedle assembly including a retractable sheath
WO2007139741A1 *May 18, 2007Dec 6, 2007Becton Dickinson CoIv catheter assembly with an ergonomic needle grip
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/192, 206/365, 604/171
International ClassificationA61M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/0612
European ClassificationA61M25/06D