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Publication numberUS3597520 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1971
Filing dateJun 19, 1969
Priority dateJun 19, 1969
Publication numberUS 3597520 A, US 3597520A, US-A-3597520, US3597520 A, US3597520A
InventorsAndrews Henry S
Original AssigneeAndrews Henry S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drum practice pad
US 3597520 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Henry S. Andrews [72] inventor 1121 S.E. Lincoln Street, Portland, Oreg. 97214 [21] Appl. No. 834,751 I [22] Filed June 19,1969 [45] Patented Aug. 3, 1971 [54] DRUM PRACTICE PAD 3,113,480 12/1963 Giarratano 3,186,290 6/1965 Gouldetal.

ABSTRACT: A drum practice pad having a solid base portion of relatively hard material into which a circular pad of soft gum rubber is recessed to a depth approximately equal to onehalf of the thickness of said rubber. said base portion being of a diameter to permit it to fit on a head of a drum inside the rim thereof but without touching the rim, thereby to permit said base to be supported on the head of the drum or independently on a drum stand or other support. A drummer may practice with drumsticks on that side of the base portion into which said rubber pad is recessed or with drum brushes on the opposite side.

PATENTED AUG 3l97| 3, 597,520

HENRY S. ANDREWS lNVE/VTOI? BUG/(HORN, BLORE, KLAWOU/ST 8 SPAR/(MAN ATTORNEYS DRUM PRACTICE PAID BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to drum practice pads which may be positioned either directly on the head of the drum or independently upon a drum stand or other support.

A problem which has confronted both drum instructors and students alike has been that of providing means to reduce the noise level ofa practicing student so as not to disturb those in the vicinity while he is improving his skills.

As such, a number of drum practice pads have been developed, but none has been particularly satisfactory.

SUMMARY OF Til-IE INVENTION The drum practice pad of the present invention is capable of being supported either directly on the drumhead or independently on a drum stand or other support. It comprises a base portion of relatively hard material substantially in the form of a flat circular cylinder having playing surfaces normal to its axis. The diameter of the base portion is substantially equal to the inner diameter of the drumhead on which the practice pad may be supported, thereby to permit the pad to be seated on the drumhead inside the rim thereof without touching the rim.

A circular pad of relatively soft resilient material such as pure gum rubber and of a diameter less than the diameter of the base portion is recessed into one of the playing surfaces thereof to a depth approximately equal to one-half of the thickness of the rubber pad. The resulting structure permits a drummer to practice with drumsticks on that side of the drum practice pad into which the soft resilient pad is recessed, or he need only turn the pad over to be able to practice with drum brushes on the opposite side.

The drum practice pad of the present invention is superior in sensitivity, endurance, and in its ability to help every drummer. It has the natural feel of the drum, providing the drummer with neither an overreaction nor an underreaction from the natural feel. Since it is approximately the size ofthe drum itself, it gives the student the ability to practice natural presswork. it permits the student to practice with either drumsticks or brushes.

The pad permits use either directly upon the head of the drum or independently upon a regular drum stand and will fit all regular snare stands. It remains firm even on glass surfaces. Furthermore, it eliminates the difficulty of having to carry complicated stands around and to make numerous adjustments.

Since the base portion is slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the drumhead, clearing the rim thereof, it will permit the natural sound of the drum to come through in practice, whether the pad is used on a snare drum or on a tom-tom, and irrespective of whether the student is practicing with drum sticks on the rubber side or on the opposite side with brushes.

The fact that the soft rubber pad is inset or recessed into the base portion provides better tone. Since approximately onehalf of the thickness of the rubber pad extends above the surface of the base portion, the pad of the present invention also permits the drummer to achieve the same feel as he would if he were practicing a rim shot on a regular snare drum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view ofa drum practice pad made in accordance with the present invention positioned on the head ofa snare drum.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view on line 2-2 of FIG. 1 showing use ofthe pad with drumsticks on the rubber side thereof.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing use ofthe pad with drum brushes on the opposite side thereof.

FIG. 4 is a view of the pad supported independently on a drum stand.

2 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, the drum practice pad 10 of the present invention is illustrated in connection with a standard 14-inch snare drum 111, although the pad can be made to fit any size drum including tom-toms and base drums from 18 inches through 22 inches in size.

As such, the pad 10 includes a solid base portion 112 preferably made of five-layer cross grain plywood of the highest quality. The base portion 12 is substantially in the form of a flat circular cylinder having upper and lower surfaces normal to its axis. For the l4 inch snare drum illustrated, the base portion 112 is preferably made 13% inches in diameter and three-fourths inch in thickness or height. A l3 /z-inch diameter is substantially equal to the inner diameter of the drumhead; that is, it is substantially equal to the diameter across the drumhead in between the rim 13 thereof. Thus the base portion 12 may be positioned on the drumhead 14 to be seated thereon inside the rim 13 thereof, but it is of such a size that it will not touch the rim. In the case ofsnare drums having a turned-in rim ofstandard Ai-inch thickness, the pad 10 of the present invention will just fit inside the rim. Since the base portion 112 is thus slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the drumhead, it permits the natural sound of the drum to come through in practice.

As shown, the Winch thickness or height of the base portion i2 is only a small fraction ofits diameter. Making the base portion V4. inch thick for a 13 /-inch diameter provides an optimum proportion for the pad 10. If the base portion were thicker than this, it would lose too much of the sound; if it were appreciably thinner, it would lose the solid feel.

The base portion 12 when made of plywood may be finished in a wood finish, as by being stained, varnished, enameled or painted, or it may be provided with a plastic-coated finish. If desired, the base portion 12 may be constructed from plastic material, such as an A-B-S plastic, or from an acrylic or resin type of plastic, in which case the base portion 12 is made according to the same size specifications as in the case of a plywood base with the exception that the finish is, of course, compatible with the type of plastic used for its construction.

A circular pad 15 of relatively soft resilient material, preferably pure gum rubber, is inset or recessed into one of the playing surfaces 16 of the base portion 12 to a depth approximately equal to one-half the thickness of the pad 15. The pad 115 is centered in the base portion 12 to a depth approximately equal to one-half the thickness of the pad 15. The pad 15 is centered in the base portion 12 and is cemented thereto. In the case ofa base portion of l3 /2-inch diameter suitable for use with a 14-inch diameter drum, the rubber pad 15 is preferably made 12 inches in diameter and A inch thick and is inset or recessed into the surface 16 of the base portion 12 to a depth of one-eighth inch. Thus, the diameter of the rubber pad 115 is less than the diameter of the base portion 12, and its thickness is substantially less than the thickness or height of the base portion. Recessing the rubber pad 15 into the base portion 112 provides a better tone, yet permits enough of the thickness thereof to extend above the surface 16 to permit the drummer to obtain the same feel" as he would if he were practicing on a regular snare drum.

In use, the pad 10 is placed directly on the drum 1] or it can be used independently by being placed directly on the snare drum stand 117 or on any flat surface. It is struck with the drumsticks on the rubber side and with drum brushes on the opposite side.

When the pad 10 is being used on the drumhead 114, with the rubber side up, the snare should be loosened slightly more than in usual playing. This will permit the pad 10 to permit some of the natural sound of the snare drum to come through. For practicing with brushes, the pad 10 need only be turned over and placed on the head of the drum with the rubber side down. Since the base portion 12 does not touch the rim 13, the drummer can actually hear his brushwork through the drum.

lclaim:

l. A drum practice pad capable of being supported on the head of a drum or independently on a drum stand or other support, comprising:

a solid base portion substantially in the form of a flat circular cylinder and made of relatively hard material,

the diameter of said base portion being substantially equal to the inner diameter of said drumhead to permit said base portion to be seated on said drumhead inside the rim thereof without touching said rim,

the height of said base portion being a small fraction of its diameter,

the upper and lower surfaces of said base portion being normal to its axis and defining playing surfaces for practicing a drum type of musical instrument, and

a circular pad of relatively soft resilient material,

said soft resilient pad being of a diameter less than said diameter of said base portion, said soft resilient pad being of a uniform thickness substantially less than said height of said base portion, said soft resilient pad being recessed into one of said playing surfaces of said base portion to a depth approximately equal to one-half of the thickness of said soft resilient pad, whereby a drummer may practice with drumsticks on that side of said drum practice pad into which said soft resilient pad is recessed or by turning said practice pad over, with drum brushes on the opposite side.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2565225 *Oct 5, 1949Aug 21, 1951Gladstone William DAppliance for musical instruments
US3105406 *May 25, 1961Oct 1, 1963Ippolito Francis JPractice drum
US3113480 *Jan 24, 1962Dec 10, 1963Joseph GiarratanoPractice drum pad
US3186290 *Nov 13, 1962Jun 1, 1965Arnold GoldbergPercussion instrument practice
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4037509 *Dec 29, 1975Jul 26, 1977Ralph SlomovitsPractice cymbal cover
US4356660 *Aug 10, 1981Nov 2, 1982Brien Kenneth J OTwirling disc
US4469004 *May 12, 1982Sep 4, 1984Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki KaishaBass drum used for training purposes
US4581972 *Oct 29, 1984Apr 15, 1986Hoshino Gakki Co., Ltd.Pad for electronic drum
US4581973 *Oct 29, 1984Apr 15, 1986Hoshino Gakki Co., Ltd.Pad with drumhead for electronic drum
US5493942 *Jan 21, 1994Feb 27, 1996Wolf; Mitchell E.Removable drumhead for drum brushing
US5929354 *Jan 30, 1997Jul 27, 1999Ethos International CorporationOne-piece drum practice pad and method of practicing drumming
US6362407 *Apr 27, 2000Mar 26, 2002Denny R. DennisDrum practice pads and drum pad musical instruments
US7638701Jun 23, 2004Dec 29, 2009Remo, Inc.Musical drum practice pads
US7763788 *Aug 1, 2008Jul 27, 2010Martin Richard WachterCymbal muting system
US7985908Jul 23, 2009Jul 26, 2011Offworld PercussionPractice drum pad assembly and rim therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/411.00R, 84/465, 984/151
International ClassificationG10D13/02, G10D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10D13/029
European ClassificationG10D13/02K