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Publication numberUS3597722 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1971
Filing dateOct 13, 1969
Priority dateOct 13, 1969
Publication numberUS 3597722 A, US 3597722A, US-A-3597722, US3597722 A, US3597722A
InventorsGeorge Walter
Original AssigneeMalco Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector
US 3597722 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor George Walter Chicago, Ill. AppL-No. 865.775 Filed Oct. 13. 1969 Division of Ser. \'0. 667,245, Sept. 12,1967, Pat. No. 3.496.517 Patented Aug. 3, i971 Assignee Malco Manufacturing Company, Inc. v

Chicago, Ill.

CONNECTOR 5 Claims, 1 1 Drawing Figs.

s, (l v 339/19, 24/73, 24/216, 339/17, 339/18 Int. Cl A441: 21/00, H0 1 r 9/02 Field ofSearch 339/18, l9,

17, 258 P; 24/73 B, 73.7, 223, 224, 222, 222 BS, 216,211 K, l30,8l TH Primary Examiner.lames A. Leppink Assistant Examiner-Terrell F. Lewis Attorney-Hume, Clement, Hume & Lee

ABSTRACT: A connector clip for making an electrical connection between a terminal post and an apertured plate or the like. The clip has resilient parallel legs and bows outwardly to grip the post between them while anchoring itself in the aperture. The plate provides a uniform power source at all terminals to which it is connected and is insulated from a ground plate, which it overlies, and in which the terminals are mounted.

PATENIEB ms 312m 3, 597,722

sum 2 or 3 PATENTED A G 3 SHEET 3 0F 3 CONNECTOR This application is a division of the copending application of George Walter, Ser. No. 667,245, filed Sept. 12, I967, entitled CONNECTOR, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,496,5 l 7, issued Feb. 17, 1970.

This invention is in the field of electrical hardware. It deals particularly with electrical hardware especially suited for high density computer circuitry and the like.

It is now common for computer circuitry to include'terminal plates seating thousands of electrical terminals. A preferred arrangement comprising multiple, parallel rows of wire wrap terminals seated in self-locking relationship (as described in the Just et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,995,617, assigned to the same assignee as the present invention) in insulators extending through corresponding apertures in the terminal plates. The terminals conventionally have wire wrap posts on one end and contacts on their opposite ends suitably disposed in the insulators for' receipt of mating terminals or printed circuit boards or the like. The wire wrap posts are connected to computer circuitry leads or a power source by wire wrap techniques.

Power for the circuitry in which these self-locking terminals are components has conventionally been distributed by conductor wires connecting certain terminals to a power source. This arrangement has serious drawbacks in computer circuitry, however. Current distribution is necessarily affected by conductor length and size, for example. Variations in voltage drop from one terminal to another occur through the conductors. In a computer, where very slight voltage variations actually affect the basic functions of the computer, including relay and semiconductor triggering andthe like, uniform power distribution is of primary importance.

To solve this problem of uniform power distribution, the applicant has developed a power plate arrangement wherein power is supplied through a separate plate overlying and generally insulated from the conventional ground plate upon which the terminals are mounted. As such, it is an object of the invention to provide a power plate arrangement for a multiple terminal complex wherein uniform voltage is provided to any selected terminal throughout a multitude of terminals mounted in a ground plate.

Another object is to provide a power plate arrangement wherein a voltage plate and ground plate sandwich acts as a capacitor in affording a current storage unit so that even if current fluctuations occur, the capacitor continues to provide a constant current flow to terminals connected to the voltage plate.

wherein a magnetic field is developed around the connections made so as to shield them from interference by adjacent circuitry.

Yet another object is to provide a plate arrangement wherein the voltage distribution means acts as an excellent heat dissipation medium.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved connector for connecting terminal wire wrap posts to electrical components such as a voltage plate or printed circuit board or the like.

It is another object to provide a connector which comprises a rugged and reliable, yet simple and inexpensive, connector clip.

It is still another object to provide a connector clip which is quickly and simply seated in temporary or permanent connection ofa terminal post and a voltage plate, for example, to provide a superior electrical connection between these components.

It is yet another object to provide a connector clip which effectively clamps the terminal post and bites into a voltage plate so as to assure a superior connection regardless of the presence of foreign material, films or oxides or the like. on the surface ofthese components.

It is a further object to provide a connector clip which, when properly seated, readily adapts itself to relative move- Still another object is to provide a power plate arrangement 'overlies the ground plate in sandwiched relationship. A layer of insulating material such as an epoxy resin or the like is disposed between the plates, whereby a capacitor is formed, affording a current storage" capacity. The terminals are mounted in insulated relationship in the ground plate and extend through suitably formed apertures in the voltage plate. The voltage plate (or plates) is connected to each selected terminal by'providing a connector clip which comprises two generally parallel legs fabricated of resilient, conductive material, resiliently joined to each other at at least one corresponding end. The legs resiliently clamp a terminal post. The legs arev retained in this clamped relationship on the post by locking feet which extend generally perpendicular from corresponding legs into prescribed apertures in a power plate, for example.

In one form of the voltage clip, it is adapted to connect a single terminal post to a component such as a voltage plate. In this form, the clip legs are resiliently joined at only one corresponding end. The locking feet are formed integrally with and extend perpendicular from the opposite free ends of the legs. In another form of the clip, it connects two terminal posts to the voltage plate. In this form, the legs are resiliently joined at both corresponding ends. The'locking feet are formed integrally with the legs generally intermediate the resiliently joined opposite ends of the legs.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the attached drawings, in which: 7

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a ground terminal plate and power plate assembly;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the assembly illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of a portion of the ground terminal plate and power plate assembly illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, showing a connector clip embodying features of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a plan view'of a portion of the voltage plate, illustrating a segment of its dielectric film;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a first form of clip-type connector embodying features of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of the connector illustrated in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an end elevational view of the connector illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7;

FIG. 8a is an end elevational view of a modified form of the connector illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7;

FIG. 9 is a plan view, similar to FIG. 3, illustrating a second form of the clip-type connector; and

FIG. 10 is a side view of the clip-type connector illustrated in FIG. 9.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, an electrical connector assembly is seen generally at 10. The assembly 10 comprises a ground terminal plate 11, usually fabricated of an aluminum alloy, mounting a plurality of terminals 12 in suitably formed apertures 13 (see FIG. 2) in the plate 11. Overlying the ground terminal plate, and insulated therefrom, is a power plate 15, which is also fabricated of an aluminum alloy or other conductive material. The power plate 15 is connected to a source (not shown) of current, as at 17, and provides a uniform current dwell at any and every point throughout its extent.

Because the current dwell is unifor'mthrou'ghout the power plate 15, any selected terminal or terminals l2.can be tapped into the power plate immediately adjacent the terminal and receive precisely the same current flow. Thus, the voltage at any and all such power" terminals 12 is exactly the same. it then becomes possible, according to the present invention, to develop computer circuitry which completely obviates malfunction due to voltage irregularities in power transmission.

It has been pointed out that the ground terminal plate 11 and the power plate are insulated from each other. More precisely, a film of dielectric material such as an epoxy resin or the like extends between the ground terminal plate .1 1 and the power plate 15. The epoxy resin film is actually applied to the power plate 15 by conventional 'silk sc'reen techniques, spraying orvapor deposition, for example.

The aforedescribed arrangement of metal plates 11 and 15 and a dielectric film 20 between them forms a capacitor; the plates 11 and 15 being at different potentials since power is supplied to the power plate 15, while the ground terminal plate is normally grounded. Acting as'a capacitor, the assembly 10 provides a current storage" unit so that even if current fluctuations occur at the power source, the capacitor continues to provide a constant current flow at any terminals 12 which are tapped into the voltage plate 15 The power plate 15 also has a magnetic field formed around it when supplied with power. This field serves to shield the terminals 12 from outside electrical interference. Furthermore, the plate 15 serves as a conductor to channel heat away from the terminals.

Turning to FIGS. 3-5, the terminal connector assembly 10, or part of it, is seen substantially enlarged. Note that the ground terminal plate 11 is substantially thicker than the power plate 15. In practice, the ground terminal plate is preferably constructed of aluminum alloy plate which is ap proximately 0.80 inch in' thickness, while the voltage plate 15 is constructed of aluminum alloy plate of approximately 0.30 inch in thickness. The thickness of the ground terminal plate 11 is sufficient to provide the assembly 10 with structural strength and rigidity required, while the thickness of the voltage plate 15 is sufficient to assure excellent conductivity and uniform current dwell throughout, while being thin enough to occupy minimal space.

The aluminum ground terminal plate 11' is anodized after the terminal apertures 13 are formed in it to protect the plate surface. Anodizing is preferably avoided in selected areas by masking, however, to afford good contact areas for grounding connection. Since the feature does not pertain to this invention, however, it is not illustrated or described in detail.

Each terminal 12 comprises a terminal pin'25- seated in selflocking relationship, as described in the aforementioned Just et al. patent, in a bushing 26 extending through a prescribed aperture 13 (see FIG. 4). The bushing 26 is fabricated of a dielectric material, preferably nylon, for example, and includes a circular cylindrical locking section 28 and a square head section 29. In the ground terminal plate 11 and terminal 12 arrangement illustrated, the terminals 12 areadapted to receive male blade connectors in the head sections 29 where they mate with the terminal pins 25. Alternatively, however, printed circuit boards might be received bythe head sections 29 to connectto the terminal pins. In the latter instance, of course, the construction and configuration of the head section 29 would differ considerably.

Each terminal pin illustrated comprises a wire wrap post which extends through the locking section 28 of the bushing 26, and a suitably formed female tine arrangement (not shown) within the head section 29. The pins are fabricated of brass or phosphor bronze or the like. The terminal posts 35 are conventionally either 0.25 or 0.45 inch square in cross section and are adapted to receive and retain wire leads applied by conventional wire-wrapping techniques.

The power plate 15 is also fabricated of an aluminum alloy, as has been pointed out. Circular cylindrical apertures of slightly larger diameter than the apertures 13 in the ground terminal plate llare formed in the power plate 15, in a pattern corresponding precisely to the pattern of apertures 13 in the terminal plate. The power plate 15 is then iridite finished for conductive purposes,- similar to the terminal plate 11.

' After the power plate 15 has been finished in the aforedescribed manner, a thin strip 42 of plastic tape is preferably applied to one surface 43 over one or more rows of apertures 40 in the plate 15 which are not programmed to overlie terminals 12. As illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 where one row of these apertures 40a are illustrated, the tape thus closes these apertures to communication with one surface 43 of the power plate 15.

With a row,.for example, of apertures 40a masked in the aforedescribed manner, the thin film 20 of a dielectric material, an epoxy resin in this case, is applied to the surface 43 of the power plate 15. According to present practice, the film 20 is applied by, silk-screening techniques. However, the film 20 might bevapplied in other ways, such as by spraying or vapor deposition, for example. At any rate, a dielectric film 20 is formed over the entire surface 43 of the power plate 15.

As the film 20 is applied to the surface 43 of the power plate 15 by silk screening, for example, it also forms within the apertures 40 which are not covered by the masking plastic tape 42. A thin section of film 46 thus also builds up within these unmasked apertures 40.

With the ground terminal plate 11 mounting thousands of terminals in a prescribed arrangement, and the power plate 15 prepared in the aforementioned manner, the plates 11 and 15 are sandwiched together, as illustrated in FIG. 4.. The open apertures 40 of the power plate 15, lined with the film 46 of plastic, are seated over the extending ends of corresponding locking sections 28 of the terminal bushings 26'until the film 20 lies flush against the surface 48 of the ground terminal plate 11. With the power plate 15 seated snugly against the ground terminal plate 11, the free ends 49 of the locking sections 28- in the terminal bushings 26 preferably lie flush with the outer surface 50 on the power plate 15.

The power plate 15 is connected to a power source (not shown) by suitably leads connected to the plate. The thickness of the plate 15 is such that a constant current dwell is established throughout the plate. According to the present invention, a precisely identical voltage is thus available at each of an entire row of terminals 12, for example, through identical connector clips 60 (only several of which are shown) embodying features of the invention.

Terminal clips 60 ordinarily connect one or more terminals 12 in one row of a block of terminals to a power plate 15, for example. The block of terminals 12 might be connected to a multiple lead connector block forming terminations for a single or multiple circuitry module. Power is supplied to the module from the power plate 15, through the clips 60 and the terminals 12.

One of the terminal clips 60 is illustrated in mounted relationship in figS. 3 and 4. The terminal clip 60 embodies features of the first form of the present invention. it tightly clamps onto the wire wrap post 35 of a terminal pin 25 and, at the same time, resiliently wedges into the apertures 40a in the power plate 15 which are not lined with the film section 46 of insulating plastic. The clip 60 is sufficiently flexible so that even if the post 35 is flexed or bent during handling of the assembly 10, the clip remains seated and maintains an excellent electrical connection between the power plate 15 and the terminal pin 25.

' Referring now to FIGS. 6-8, in addition to FIGS. 3 and 4, the connector clip 60 if formed from a single strip of beryllium copper or phosphor bronze by die punching or the like and includes identical, parallel legs 65 joined by a common base section 66 at adjacent one ends of the legs. The legs 65 and base section 66 are generally flat, while perpendicularly extending feet 67 depend from the other ends 68 of each of the legs 65.

Formed in opposing relationship on the inner edge 69 of each of the legs 65 intermediate the base section 66 of the clip 60 and the free ends 68 of the legs 65 are shallow, semirectangular cutouts 72. The cutouts 72 are adapted to receive and clamp onto the wire wrap post 35 and, accordingly, each cutout 72 is preferably 0.025 or 0.045 inch in width.

A clip 60 is slipped over the wire wrap post 35 of each selected terminal 12 and forced downwardly into the position shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The feet 67 are wedged into the apertures 40a in the power plate 15. The feet 67 are relatively short, their length being slightly less than the thickness of the plate so the insulation is not punctured. In contrast, the legs 65 are relatively long.

The width of each clip 60 between its outer edges 75, in a relaxed condition, is greater than the diameter of the apertures 400 into which the feet 67 are received, and the distance between the bottoms of the cutouts 72 normally provides a slip fit over the wire wrap post 35. Accordingly, when the feet 67 of the clip 60 are pinched together and placed into a corresponding aperture 40a in the power plate 15, the legs 65 of the clip are bowed outwardly and clamp the terminal post 35 in the cutouts 72. At the same time, the spring force in the bowed, resilient legs 65 causes the outer edges 75 of the feet 67 to bite into the side of the aperture 400. The clip 60 is thus resiliently clamped into place and excellent electrical connections are established between the clip and the post 35, as well as between the clip and the power plate 15. Because of the resiliency of the clip 60, it will not inadvertently work loose from its seated relationship on the post 35 and in the power plate 15, even if the post 35 is bent extensively, for example. Referring to FIG. 80, however, it is possible to provide additional retaining means for the clip 15 by serrating the outer edges of the feet 67, as at 750.

The clip 60, while is adapted to be connectedto a single terminal post 35, is illustrated as a relatively straight member with its base section 66 directly opposite the cutouts 72 from the feet 67 of the clip. However, it should be understood that if terminal density is greater, and clip size presents interference problems, the base section 66 and those portions of the legs 65 between the cutouts 72 and the base section 66 might be canted at an angle or split into two separate or splayed base sections. it is only necessary that the extremities of the base section be sufficiently spaced from the cutouts 72 to assure that a resiliently tight clamping effect will be made on the post 35 without breaking the clip at the base section.

Attention is now directed to FIGS. 9 and 10 where a connector clip 80 embodying features of a second form of the present invention is illustrated. The clip 80 is substantially identical in concept to the clip 60, but is adapted to connect two terminal posts 135 to a power plate 115 through a single power plate aperture 1400. The clip 80 is also formed of beryllium copper or phosphor bronze by die punching, for example.

The clip 80 comprises elongated, parallel legs 85 joined at their opposite ends by identical base sections 86. The legs 85 are somewhat irregularly shaped. They are, however, substantially identical to each other in configuration, although oppositely arranged in the clip as will be recognized.

Each leg 85 includes a relatively short end section 88, a central section 89 and a relatively longer opposite end section 90. On the opposed end sections 88 and 90, the inner edge is squared, as at 91, to engage and clamp the sides of a corresponding terminal post 135.

The oppositely disposed central sections 89 of the legs 85 have a foot 95 bent downwardly therefrom, as best illustrated in FIG. 10. The outer edges 96 of the feet are, in the relaxed condition of the clip 80, spaced apart a distance greater than the diameter of the corresponding aperture 140a through the power plate 115. In addition, the opposed edges 91 in the leg sections 88, 90 are normally spaced apart sufficiently to make a slip fit to the corresponding terminal posts 135.

The clip 80 is slipped over a pair of terminal posts 135 in much the same manner that the clip 60 is mounted on a single post 35. The clip 80 is forced downwardly on the post 135 until the feet 95 reach and are pinched together and placed into the corresponding apertures 140a. As the feet expand into the aperture, they bite into its surface as the opposed edges 91 clamp tightly onto the terminal 135. Similar to the clip 60, an excellent electrical connection, with the clip actually clamping onto the posts and biting into the aperture a, is effected. Even if the posts 135 are bent extensively, the resiliency of the clip 80 permits it to remain securely seated and maintain an excellent connection.

The connector clips 60 and 80 have been described in detail solely in the context of a power plate 15 connection to a square cross section wire wrap post. lt is within the purview of the invention, however, to make connections with these clips to printed circuit boards and other electrical components from round pins or pins having other cross-sectional configurations.

While several embodiments described herein are at present considered to be preferred, it is understood that various modifications and improvements may be made therein.

What I desire to claim and secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A connector clip for electrically connecting a terminal post in an electrical terminal with a plate having one aperture through which said post extends and another aperture adjacent said one aperture, comprising:

a. a pair of generally coextensive legs formed of resilient material and disposed substantially parallel to each other,

b. each end of one of said legs being disposed adjacent the corresponding end of the other of said legs,

c. a common base section joining one pair of adjacent ends of said legs together,

d. a foot extending from each of the other adjacent ends of said legs for seating in said other aperture, and

e. a cutout formed in the opposed surfaces of each of said legs between said base section and said feet for engaging and clamping the post when said feet are seated in the other aperture. 7

2. A connector clip for electrically connecting a terminal post in an electrical terminal with a plate having one aperture through which said post extends and another aperture adjacent said one aperture, comprising:

a. a pair of relatively long, generally coextensive legs formed of resilient material and disposed substantially parallel to each other,

b. each end-of one of said legs being disposed adjacent the corresponding end of the other of said legs,

c. a common base section joining at least one pair of adjacent ends of said legs together,

a relatively short foot for seating in said other aperture depending from each of said legs at a distance substantially greater than the length of said feet from said base section, and

e. means formed on opposed inner surfaces of said legs disposed between said base section and said feet for resiliently engaging and clamping the post,

f. said legs being long enough so that they bow outwardly around the post when said feet are seated in said other aperture and said engaging and clamping means grip the post. 1

3. The clip of claim 2 further characterized in that:

a. said legs and said base section lie substantially in a single plane, and

b. said feet depend generally perpendicular from said plane.

4. The clip of claim 2 further characterized in that:

a. said feet depend from the other ends of each of said legs.

5. The connector clip of claim 2 further characterized in that:

a. said legs are joined together by common base sections at both ends of the legs,

b. said feet depend from each of said legs intermediate said base sections,

c. said engaging means include means formed on opposed inner surfaces of said legs disposed between said feet and each of said base sections.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US501439 *Apr 12, 1893Jul 11, 1893 Plumber s hook
US2231153 *Jan 11, 1940Feb 11, 1941Gen Motors CorpSpring clip
US2454894 *Jan 1, 1944Nov 30, 1948Boeing CoHook
US2747169 *Feb 20, 1953May 22, 1956Cinch Mfg CorpContact for printed circuits
US3183030 *May 24, 1963May 11, 1965Ernest SchlueterFastening clip
FR1417100A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762043 *Sep 1, 1971Oct 2, 1973Malco Mfg IncMethod and apparatus for mounting connector clips
US3831129 *Sep 14, 1973Aug 20, 1974Thomas & Betts CorpDeflectable jumper strip
US3969010 *May 17, 1974Jul 13, 1976E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanySubstrate with improved contact terminals
US4475782 *Jan 7, 1982Oct 9, 1984Buck Engineering Co., Inc.Electrical connector apparatus
US5401180 *Jun 1, 1993Mar 28, 1995Itt CorporationConnector shorting spring
DE4234835C2 *Oct 15, 1992Jan 17, 2002Siemens AgVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Fixieren von Steckerstiften in einem Steckergehäuse
EP0226820A1 *Nov 18, 1986Jul 1, 1987Siemens AktiengesellschaftDevice for fastening locating strips
EP0632546A2 *May 31, 1994Jan 4, 1995Itt Industries, Inc.Connector shorting spring
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/510, 439/43, 24/630, 24/350
International ClassificationA44B99/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01R23/72, H01R9/09
European ClassificationH01R9/09, H01R23/72