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Publication numberUS3597863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1971
Filing dateFeb 24, 1969
Priority dateFeb 26, 1968
Publication numberUS 3597863 A, US 3597863A, US-A-3597863, US3597863 A, US3597863A
InventorsAustin Clive Jonathan, Austin Marcus Luther
Original AssigneeAustin Clive Jonathan, Austin Marcus Luther
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sports shoes
US 3597863 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Marcus Luther Austin [56 mm 33 I M I UNITED STATES PATENTS I 2,697,288 12/1954 Wilcox 36/59 Avenue, both of Bedlord, Bedtordshire,

England [2| 1' Appl. No. 801.509 l22| Filed Feb. 24,1969 [45] Patented Aug. 10, 197! I 3 2] Priority Feb. 26, 1968 [33] Great Britain 3 l 1 9173/68 [54] SPORTS SHOES 3.327,4l2 6/l967 Wilmannsetal. 3,410,005 ll/l968 Szerenyi Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney-Sommers & Young ABSTRACT: A shoe, such as a golf shoe having a molded sole embodying a plurality of preformed molded members of higher mechanical strength than the main sole body each molded member comprising a receptacle portion for removably securing a spike, and an integral plate portion sandwiched within the thickness of the sole and performing the function of distributing ground pressure on a spike secured in the receptacle over a large area of the sole, the molded members being embodied in the sole as individual units or as a multiple unit or multiple units of interconnected preformed molded members.

Patented Aug. 10, 1971 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Patented Aug. 10, 1971 3,597,863

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 25 U 3 MARCUS LUTHER AUSTIN CLIVE JONATHAN AUSTIN SPORTS SHOES This invention relates to boots and shoes (hereafter referred tosimply as shoes) of the kind having a molded sole in which are incorporated receptacles adapted to receive studs or spikes (hereafter referred to simply as spikes) and has particular, but not exclusive, application to golf shoes.

Conventional spikes generally have flanges which lie against the underside of the sole in order to transmit the pressure of the ground on the spike point to a wider area of sole, so aiding lateral stability of the spike and reducing spike pressure on the underside of the foot. Conventional spike receptacles designed to receive such flanged spikes have the disadvantage that when mud and grass collects beneath the flange and hardens, the resulting misalignment of the spike eventually leads to loosening of the receptacle within the sole. With the invention of softer and more flexible sole materials (for example cellular materials) the problem of satisfactorily incorporating the spike receptacles in the soles has become more acute. 1

The initial object of this invention was to obviate the presence of spike flanges on the undersurface of the sole and so eliminate a main cause of the problem. However the invention in meeting this object provided, as will become apparent, an advantageous arrangement for use with conventional flanged spikes particularly in cases where the aforesaid softer and more flexible sole materials are used.

According to this invention in a shoe of the kind having a molded sole, a preformed molded member of higher mechanical strength than the main sole body is embodied in the main sole body and has a receptacle portion for securing a spike to the sole and an integral plate portion sandwiched within the thickness of the sole and extending over an area of the sole outside the confines of the receptacle portion to distribute the ground pressure on a spike secured in said receptacle over said area of the sole.

Said plate portion may extend as a flange surrounding said receptacle portion or it may be remote from said receptacle portion, said spike pressure being transmitted from the receptacle portion to the plate portion by an interconnecting portion.

Said plate portion may be concave on its upper surface and convex on its lower surface.

In one embodiment of the invention a plurality of said molded members are interconnected to form a multiple unit, the interconnecting portions serving to transmit spike pressure throughout the unit.

In another embodiment of the invention as a multiple unit, the plate portions also serve as interconnections between receptacle portions.

In a still further embodiment as a multiple unit a plurality of said molded members may be interconnected by a mesh.

In order that the invention may be readily understood, embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 shows a fragmentary section through a molded sole body according to one embodiment,

FIGS. 2 and 3 show modifications of the molded member embodying the spike receptacle shown in FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 shows a fragmentary perspective view of a molded sole body embodying two interconnected molded members of the form shown in FIG. 1,

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 show molded members of the form shown in FIG. 4 interconnected in various ways to form multiple units of spike receptacles,

FIG. 8 shows in elevation a further form of multiple unit,

FIGS. 9 and I show respectively a plan view and elevational view of a still further form of multiple unit,

FIG. II shows a sectional view through yet another form of multiple unit, and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary section through a molded sole body in which the receptacle portion of the molded member extends to the underside surface of the sole, the molded member being of slightly different form from that shown in FIG. 1.

In the different embodiments corresponding parts have been given the same reference numerals.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. I a portion of a molded sole body I having embedded wholly within its thickness a member 2 of molded material. The member 2 has a central boss forming a spike receptacle portion 3 with threaded bore 4 into which a spike 5 is screwed to secure the latter to the sole 1. In the specifically illustrated embodiment, the spike 5 is shown as being detachably secured to bore 4; however, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the concepts of this invention are equally applicable to an arrangement wherein the spike 5 is formed integrally with member 2. Extending from the receptacle portion 3 is a plate portion 6 defining a circular flange around the receptacle portion 3 and curved to give the member 2 a dished or concave upper surface and a convex lower surface which renders it compatible with the contours of the sole when the latter is flexed during walking. The spike 5 shown in full line in FIG. 1 is a flangeless spike having flats at 7 for engagement by a tool to fit or remove the spike 5. The plate portion 6 serves to distribute upward pressure on the point of the spike 5 over a wider area of the sole and aids lateral stability of the spike S. It thus serves the function of the flange of a flanged spike. In order to perform this junction effectively it must have greater mechanical strength than the main sole body 1 in which it is embedded, that is to say greater tensile, compressive and shear resistance than the sole body 1. Nevertheless the sole body I and molded member 2 can be selected to be chemically compatible so as to achieve a'satisfactory chemical bond between them; for example the sble body I could be soft P.V.C. and the molded member 2 hard P.V.C. Another suitable material for the molded member 2 is nylon.

The molded members 2 are formed by a premolding operation and are embedded in the sole body 1 during the molding of the latter. Conveniently said members 2 are preassembled with spikes 5 or with plugs. The plugs, like the spikes are screwed into the receptacle portions 3 but in the finished sole do not protrude from but are flush with the underside of the sole body 1. Such plugs provide an interchangeable fitting with the spikes for use on hard ground and would be provided with slots or depressions in their lower ends to enable removal by a key.

While the receptacle arrangement shown in FIG. 1 is particularly suitable for flangeless spikes, it is equally adapted to take flanged spikes which would be of the same general form as the spikes 5 with the addition of a flange as shown in dotted line at 8 in FIG. 1.

It is not essential for the receptacle portion 3 to be concentric with the plate portion 6. It could for example be eccentric as shown in FIG. 2 or even outside it and connected to it by an interconnecting portion 9 as shown in FIG. 3, the interconnecting portion serving to transmit spike pressure to the plate portion 6.

In FIG. 4 two of the members 2 shown in FIG. 1 are interconnected by limb II, which is integrally formed with the members 2 during the molding thereof. The limb I] will also serve to distribute local stresses over a wider area of the sole. 'Ihc limb II has holes 12 through which molding material flows during molding of the sole body 1 in order to provide a keying effect.

end of a sole body. In the multiple unit 17 one member 2 is shown with an elliptical plate portion 6, one with a circular plate portion 6 and the third with an hexagonal plate portion. These varying shapes may be chosen for any particular member 2 in the sole to suit various functional requirements.

In FIG. 7 a multiple unit 18 incorporating all the spike receptacles'for the forcpart of the sole comprises a plurality of the member 2 interconnected by a mesh 19. The mesh 19 may be molded in one with the members 2, or it could be prefabricated and the members 2 then cemented, welded or otherwise affixed to it. During the molding of the sole body 1 the material would be able to flow through the mesh 19 so that the mesh 19 becomes fully integrated with the sole body 1.

FIG. 8 shows another multiple unit in which the spike receptacle portions 3 are remote from the plate portions 6 the latter being of circular form with dished upper surfaces and convex lower surfaces. The spike receptacle portions 3 are provided as the downturned ends of molded rod 20 on which the plate portions 6 are provided during molding. This form of multiple unit is useful for mounting spikes close to the outside edge of the sole, the plate portions 6 being disposed so that they lie beneath the weight-bearing portions of the foot In the multiple unit shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 the interconnections between the spike receptacles 3 also serve as the plate portions 6 for distributing the loading pressure of spikes over a wide area of the sole. The molded plate member 21 performing this dual function is thickened at places to define the receptacle portions 3 and the plate portions 6. The plate member 21 is provided with flow holes 12 through which molding material flows during molding of the sole body 1.

In FIG. 11 the receptacle portions 3 are provided in a plate member 22 in somewhat similar manner to FIGS. 9 and 10. However the plate member 22 is thickened at the spike receptacle portions 3 so that the spike receptacles lie in different predetermined horizontal planes. This enables flangeless spikes of the same length as each other to be fitted and protrude different lengths from the underside of the sole as is desirable in certain types of sports footwear. Further the angle at which flangeless spikes protrude from the sole can be made different from each other by suitably inclining the threaded bores of the receptacle portions 3.

The spike receptacle portions 3 in any of the above embodiments may be wholly within the thickness of the sole body 1 as shown for example in FIG. 1 or they may extend to the under surface of the sole. When they do extend to the undersurface of the sole they may be provided there, as shown in FIG. 12, with a flange 23 to effect additional keying to the sole body 1.

We claim:

I. A shoe having a sole comprising,

a main sole body of molded material,

a plurality of preformed molded members of higher mechanical strength than the main sole body embodied in the main sole body,

each preformed molded member having a retaining portion for a spike and an integral plate portion sandwiched within the thickness of the main sole body for distributing the ground pressure on a spike over a larger area of the sole than that occupied by the retaining portion,

said plate portion being convex on its lower surface.

2. A shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein said plate portion is concave on its upper surface.

3. A shoe having a sole comprising,

a main sole body of molded material,

a plurality of preformed molded members of higher mechanical strength than the main sole body interconnected as a preformed multiple unit embodied in the main sole body,

each preformed molded member having a retaining portion for a spike and an integral plate portion sandwiched within the thickness of the main sole body for distributing the ground pressure on a spike over a larger area of the sole than that occupied by the retainingjportion. 4. A shoe as cla|med in claim 3, wherein t e interconnecting of said molded members to form said multiple unit is by portions formed integrally with said molded members during the molding thereof.

5. A shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein the interconnecting of said molded members to form said multiple unit is by a mesh.

6. A shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein the plate portions of said molded members also serve to interconnect the retaining portions to form the multiple unit.

7. A shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein the retaining portions of the multiple unit lie in different horizontal planes and flangeless spikes of equal length are located in said retaining portions whereby they project by different lengths from the underside ofsaid sole.

8 A shoe as claimed in claim 6, wherein said retaining portions have their spike receiving axes inclined at different angles to the underside of the sole and flangeless spikes are secured in said retaining portions.

9. A shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein all the molded members in the forcpart of the sole are interconnected as a multiple unit.

I0. A shoe as claimed in claim 3, wherein all the molded members in the heel part of the sole are interconnected as a multiple unit.

11. A shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein said retaining portion extends to the underside of the sole and is there provided with a flange which thus lies flush with the underside surface I of the sole.

(ill

12. A shoe having a sole comprising,

a main sole body formed ofa soft polyvinyl chloride,

at least one preformed molded member formed of a hard polyvinyl chloride and having a higher mechanical strength than the main sole body and bondable to said main sole body,

each said molded member being embedded within and bonded to said main sole body and having a retaining portion for a spike and an integral plate portion sandwiched within the thickness of the main sole body for distributing the ground pressure on a spike over a larger area of the sole than that occupied by said retaining portion.

13. The shoe of claim I which further includes a spike which is detachably secured to said retained portion.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2697288 *Jan 17, 1952Dec 21, 1954Wilcox Clarke LGolf shoe cleat
US3327412 *Feb 25, 1965Jun 27, 1967Weinbrenner Shoe CorpOutsoles having calks and method of manufacturing the same
US3410005 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 12, 1968Ro Search IncGolf shoe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3925529 *Oct 2, 1970Dec 9, 1975Wright & Co Inc E TMethod for making shoes with cleated bottoms
US3928881 *Jul 5, 1974Dec 30, 1975Dassler AdolfMethod and mould for the manufacture of a plastic sole for shoes
US4085526 *Jul 30, 1976Apr 25, 1978Adidas Fabrique De Chaussures De SportSole for athletic shoe
US4107857 *Apr 11, 1977Aug 22, 1978Devlin Gerard PAthletic shoe construction
US4294024 *Sep 27, 1978Oct 13, 1981Nab Joseph JSole for logging boot
US4446635 *Apr 15, 1983May 8, 1984Hayden Jr Donald WIce-creeper type overshoe
US4782604 *Jun 26, 1987Nov 8, 1988Wen Shown LoSole structure for golf shoes
US5426873 *Nov 22, 1994Jun 27, 1995Macneill Engineering Company, Inc.Cleat and process for making same
US5524367 *Apr 8, 1992Jun 11, 1996Trisport, Ltd.Removable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
US5600901 *Aug 4, 1994Feb 11, 1997Leonor; Freddie D.Spike convertible sport shoes
US5932336 *Apr 18, 1997Aug 3, 1999Acushnet CompanyShoe sole
US5987783 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 23, 1999Acushnet CompanyGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
US6449878Mar 10, 2000Sep 17, 2002Robert M. LydenArticle of footwear having a spring element and selectively removable components
US6601042May 17, 2000Jul 29, 2003Robert M. LydenCustomized article of footwear and method of conducting retail and internet business
US6948264Jan 29, 2002Sep 27, 2005Lyden Robert MNon-clogging sole for article of footwear
US7406781 *Feb 23, 2005Aug 5, 2008Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7409783 *Nov 14, 2005Aug 12, 2008Vanbestco Ltd.Spike
US7428790 *Jan 26, 2001Sep 30, 2008Penquin Brands, Inc.Universal cleat
US7579055Jul 8, 2003Aug 25, 2009Taylor Made Golf Co., Inc.Sole construction for an athletic shoe
US7584553 *Apr 7, 2006Sep 8, 2009Medley Mark MFlip flop golf sandal
US7730637Jun 30, 2008Jun 8, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US8418382Mar 16, 2011Apr 16, 2013Nike, Inc.Sole structure and article of footwear including same
US8453349Apr 1, 2010Jun 4, 2013Nike, Inc.Traction elements
US8453354Oct 1, 2009Jun 4, 2013Nike, Inc.Rigid cantilevered stud
US8529267Nov 1, 2010Sep 10, 2013Nike, Inc.Integrated training system for articles of footwear
US8533979Feb 18, 2010Sep 17, 2013Nike, Inc.Self-adjusting studs
US8567096May 2, 2011Oct 29, 2013Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US8573981Jun 28, 2010Nov 5, 2013Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear with a ball control portion
US8616892Jun 28, 2010Dec 31, 2013Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear with a traction system
US8632342Dec 11, 2009Jan 21, 2014Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear
US8713819Jan 19, 2011May 6, 2014Nike, Inc.Composite sole structure
USRE42965Dec 5, 2006Nov 29, 2011Sure Foot CorporationAnti-slip overshoe
USRE44193 *Feb 25, 2010May 7, 2013Sure Foot CorporationReplaceable spikes for anti-slip overshoe
WO2012145256A2 *Apr 16, 2012Oct 26, 2012Nike International Ltd.Method for making a cleated plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 264/277, 36/134, 36/127
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/165
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1A