Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3598118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1971
Filing dateNov 4, 1968
Priority dateNov 4, 1968
Publication numberUS 3598118 A, US 3598118A, US-A-3598118, US3598118 A, US3598118A
InventorsWarren Joseph E
Original AssigneeWarren Joseph E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of introducing an intravenous catheter into the vascular system
US 3598118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Joseph 13. Warren Old Chester Road, Gladstone, NJ. 07934 2| Appl. No 778,914 [22] Filed Nov. 4, 1968 [45] Patented Aug. 10, I971 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 564,935, July 13, 1966, now abandoned.

[54] METHOD OF INTRODUCING AN INTRAVENOUS CATHETER INTO THE VASCULAR SYSTEM 2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. C1 128/214.4, 128/343. 128/348 {51] Int. Cl A61m 5/00 [50] Field 01' Search 128/214.4, 221,343,345, 348

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 673,598 5/1901 Dolge 128/345 X Primary ExaminerDalton L. Truluck Attorneys-Kenyon & Kenyon and Reilly, Carr & Chapin ABSTRACT: A needle comprising a tube, having a pointed leading end, a longitudinal hairline slot extending the length thereof, collar means spaced from the pointed leading end, and tube walls of sufficient flexibility to permit expansion of the needle upon insertion of a catheter therethrough when the catheter has an outside diameter which is larger than the inside diameter of the tube, is employed to introduce catheters into body cavities. In use, the needle is inserted into the cavity, the catheter is then passed through the needle into the cavity causing expansion of the needle, the needle is withdrawn from the body along the catheter and, by use of the collar to further expand the needle, removed longitudinally from the needle.

PATENTED M1810 I91! INVEN'I HR.

JOSEPH E. W/JRREN DY d/ METHOD OF INTRODUCING AN INTRAVENOUS CATHETER INTO THE VASCULAR SYSTEM This application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 564,935 filed July 13, 1966, now abandoned.

This invention is concerned with a needle useful in the introduction of catheters into body cavities, and to a method for its use.

More particularly, this invention relates to an expandable needle which is useful for introducing catheters into body cavities, and in a preferred form relates to an intravascular needle which eliminates the need for performing a surgical cutdown procedure and avoid the disadvantages of retained intravascular needle procedures.

The surgical cutdown procedure consists of making an incision through the skin and subcutaneous tissue until the desired blood vessel is reached. The blood vessel is isolated from its bed, ligatures are applied and the distal end of the vessel is tied. After the distal ligature is tied, the vessel is incised and an intravascular catheter is inserted into the lumen of the vessel through the incision, where the catheter is anchored.

A common alternative to the surgical cutdown procedure has been the implacement of a conventional intravenous needle for purposes of catheterization, infusion or transfusion. However, this alternative procedure may result in damage to the vessel by the relatively rigid and sharp needle, thereby resulting in inflammation, phlebitis, leakage and infiltration of solutions being administered, and the occurrence of pain, discomfort, tissue damage, sloughing and the loss of therapeutic effect.

The present expansion needle and catheter technique provides for the insertion of a catheter by simple needle puncture, followed by advancing the catheter within the needle, and allows for immediate removal of the needle, which if left in place could cause the complications referred to above.

With specific reference to intravascular catheterization procedures, the present invention provides for the simple, sterile insertion of the needle into a blood vessel, insertion of the catheter through the expandable bore of the needle into the blood vessel lumen and removal and discard of the needle in one, continuous, simple procedure which combines the advantages of catheter cannulation and needle infusion.

The sterility of the needle and intravascular portion of the catheter is maintained by disposable and easily removable plastic sterile field covers.

The device is readily adaptable for use with conventional infusion and transfusion sets.

Attempts to solve the problem of implanting a catheter in the lumen of a blood vessel without surgical cutdown or incision have heretofore failed to provide a satisfactory solution. For example, catheter introducers not employing the principles of this invention have had the shortcoming of requiring a much larger introducer than the catheter being implanted. Thus, a larger than necessary opening was required through the skin and subcutaneous tissue, with attendant damage to the blood vessel itself. Other problems of these prior art devices include an undesirable slippage of the catheter within an unexpandable, inflexible introducer, and leakage and damage to tissues and blood vessels due to a relatively large longitudinal opening in the introducer which tends to snag and fill up with skin and subcutaneous tissue. Also, some of the devices require pinching and extensive manipulation of the catheter within the introducer, with consequent damage thereto and discomfort to the patient.

Other devices have utilized a slotted sheath or other introducer which is longitudinally removable. Such devices, however, still require a separate needle attached to the catheter tube which is not slotted nor longitudinally removable and which, therefore, requires leaving the needle in place during transfusion or infusion unless the apparatus is taken apart to remove the needle, with all the complications that would result. Such instruments utilize an inordinatenumber of parts which might cause complications and which make their use more difficult and time consuming.

The prior art devices also have the distinct disadvantage of not being packaged in a sterile container and utilized as a single unit whereby the needle or introducer can be simply withdrawn and longitudinally removed and disposed of, leaving only the implanted catheter. The simply utilized packaged unit envisioned here has the attendant advantage of being sterile and ready for use, making a transfusion or infusion simpler to perform.

The present invention allows for continuous fluid transfusion or infusion after the catheter has been implanted while the needle is being withdrawn and removed. The pressure of the fluid from the flask through the infusion tubing through the catheter tube itself remains relatively constant at a preselected rate, during this operation, which assists in the prevention of clotting, leakage, and the other problems noted above.

The principle of flexibility and expandability in the needle of the present invention by means of a hairline slot in the needle allows the use of a needle that has approximately the same inside diameter as that of the catheter itself. This makes the introduction and implanting of the catheter a simpler, safer and more comfortable operation, as well as making the longitudinal removal of the needle possible. It also allows the greatest volume of fluid to pass through the catheter, consistent with the size of the opening required to be made through the skin, subcutaneous tissue and blood vessel wall.

An object of this invention is to provide for a simple method of catheterization, infusion or transfusion by means of a needle-catheter device which combines the advantages of catheter cannulation and conventional needle infusion.

A further object of this invention is to provide for a' simple method of catheterization, infusion or transfusion by means of a needle-catheter device which allows for the placement of a catheter within the lumen of a blood vessel by means of a flexible expandable intravascular needle, which may then be easily withdrawn, removed and discarded.

Still another object of this invention is to provide for a simple method of catheterization, infusion or transfusion by means of a needle-catheter device which allows for the placement of a catheter within the lumen of a blood vessel by means of a slotted flexible, expandable intravascular needle, which by reason of such slot, may be easily withdrawn, removed and discarded.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will appear from the following description.

FIG. I is a perspective view of the intravascular expansion needle and catheter connected to a typical adapter and fluid source, after the needle has been inserted and the catheter advanced within the needle.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. I and seen in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the intravascular expansion needle taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and seen in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing the relation of the expansion needle to the catheter after the expansion needle has implanted the catheter in the blood vessel and as the expansion needle is being withdrawn in the direction of the arrow.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the expansion needle and the catheter tube as the expansion needle is being longitudinally removed from the catheter tube after the needle has been withdrawn axially along the catheter tube as shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing the catheter tube implanted within the blood vessel after the expansion needle has been withdrawn, removed and discarded.

Referring to the figures, and particularly to FIG. I, infusion flask I is shown connected to an adapter which is in turn connected to infusion tube 3 which is in turn connected to catheter l0. Catheter I0 is surrounded by expansion needle 4 which is made of metal and is slotted at 5. A flexible flange 6 is attached to the needle 4 for easy insertion, withdrawal, and

removal of the needle. The needle 4 and catheter 10 have been inserted through the skin and subcutaneous tissue 7 into the lumen 8 of blood vessel 9.

The sharp intravascular needle 4 permits simple penetration of the blood vessel wall 9. As the catheter 10 is passed through the inserted needle 4 into the blood vessel lumen 8 the expansion needle slot 5 allows for gradual unobstructed and save passage of the catheter l and when the walls of the needle tube are of substantially uniform thickness the inside surface of the tube conforms to and remains in contact with the outside surface of the catheter. The tip 11 of the catheter 10 can then be easily held in place with the fingers by simply pressing down on the skin area 7 overlying the catheterized vessel 9. The needle 4 can then be withdrawn over the infusion tubing 3 and the catheter l0 anchored in the vessel 9 by conventional taping of the externally remaining portion of the catheter 10 to the skin surface. To remove the needle 4 from the tubing 3, the needle flange 6 is simply spread apart and the needle 4 lifted away from the tubing 3 through the expanded needle slot and the needle 4 discarded.

The intravascular catheter is designed to decrease the possibility of leakage, vessel puncture and tissue damage, and to minimize the possible formation of blood clots or thrombi. The tapered, shaped, rounded edge I] is relatively atraumatic. The progressive stepwise decrease in diameter from infusion flask l to infusion tubing 3 to the intravascular catheter allows for a proportional increase in fluid pressure and velocity of the infused solution at the catheter tip ll. This provides further insurance against obstruction to effective catheter flow and against formation of blood clots and thrombi. Compounding of the plastic material with silicone when so desired provides additional protection against clot formation.

While the foregoing discussion has been specifically directed toward intravascular procedures, it is clear that the present invention is useful in connection with any procedure in which catheterization of a body cavity by penetration of body tissues is required. For example, the needle and method of the present invention are useful for catheterization of the thoracic cavity, the abdominal cavity, the cardiac cavity and the like, as well as the venous and arterial cavities comprising the vascular cavity.

What I claim is:

I. A method for introducing a catheter into a patients body cavity with an expansion needle comprising a flexible tube having a circular cross section, a pointed leading end and a single longitudinal hairline slot through the tube wall and extending the entire length of said tube, the wall of said tube being sufliciently flexible to permit radial expansion of said needle on insertion of a catheter having an outside diameter which is greater than the normal inside diameter of said tube through said tube and collar means for withdrawing the needle from the patient along the catheter and for removing it longitudinally therefrom by further expansion of said needle, said method comprising passing said needle through body tissues and into a body cavity, passing a catheter having an outside diameter greater than the inside diameter of said tube through the bore of said tube and into said cavity, whereby the walls of said tube expand about said catheter, withdrawing said needle from the body of said patient along said catheter while leaving said catheter in place, and further expanding said needle and withdrawing it longitudinally from said catheter.

2. A method for introducing a catheter into the lumen of a blood vessel as defined in claim I.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US673598 *Jul 27, 1900May 7, 1901Carl B DolgeVein opener and clamp.
US2566499 *Feb 14, 1950Sep 4, 1951Bruno RichterExpansile surgical needle
US2842133 *Feb 27, 1957Jul 8, 1958Surgic Company LtdSurgical or medical vein dilating device
US3330278 *Jun 22, 1964Jul 11, 1967Santomieri Louis SHypodermic needle for a cannula placement unit
US3359978 *Oct 26, 1964Dec 26, 1967Smith Jr Raymond MGuide needle for flexible catheters
DK109789A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3651807 *Feb 19, 1970Mar 28, 1972Huggins James ADetachable, hollow guide needle
US3774605 *Dec 28, 1971Nov 27, 1973Medical Sciences Int IncCatheter devices
US4306562 *Jul 31, 1980Dec 22, 1981Cook, Inc.Tear apart cannula
US4327722 *Aug 20, 1979May 4, 1982Groshong Leroy EMethods and apparatus for intravenous therapy and hyperalimentation
US4610671 *Mar 28, 1985Sep 9, 1986Luther Medical Products, Inc.Assembly of stylet and catheter
US4743265 *Apr 23, 1986May 10, 1988Dij Catheter CorpArticulated catheter placement device
US4846791 *Sep 2, 1988Jul 11, 1989Advanced Medical Technology & Development Corp.Multi-lumen catheter
US4957488 *Oct 19, 1988Sep 18, 1990Critikon, Inc.Through the needle catheter device
US4957489 *Oct 20, 1988Sep 18, 1990Critikon, Inc.Through the needle catheter insertion device and technique
US4964854 *Jan 23, 1989Oct 23, 1990Luther Medical Products, Inc.Intravascular catheter assembly incorporating needle tip shielding cap
US4994040 *Jun 5, 1990Feb 19, 1991Critikon, Inc.Through the needle catheter insertion device and technique
US5071408 *Feb 12, 1990Dec 10, 1991Ahmed Abdul MateenMedical valve
US5135501 *Dec 6, 1990Aug 4, 1992Ethicon, Inc.Hydrophilic polymer which expands on contact with aqueous solutions
US5160325 *Jan 22, 1991Nov 3, 1992C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter with novel lumens shapes
US5322512 *May 7, 1993Jun 21, 1994The Kendall CompanySplittable needle for epidural anesthesia
US5411473 *Oct 1, 1991May 2, 1995Ahmed; A. MateenMedical valve
US5441486 *Nov 9, 1994Aug 15, 1995Yoon; InbaeEndoscopic portal for use in endoscopic procedures and methods therefor
US5683370 *Nov 21, 1996Nov 4, 1997Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5683446 *May 25, 1995Nov 4, 1997Medtronic, Inc.Medical electrical lead having an anchoring sleeve retaining device
US5913848 *Jun 6, 1996Jun 22, 1999Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5916208 *Nov 21, 1996Jun 29, 1999Luther Medical Products, Inc.Hard tip over-the-needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US5957893 *Sep 8, 1998Sep 28, 1999Becton Dickinson & Co.Hard tip over-the needle catheter and method of manufacturing the same
US6083203 *Jan 6, 1995Jul 4, 2000Yoon; InbaeEndoscopic portal
US6554802 *Mar 31, 1999Apr 29, 2003Medtronic, Inc.Medical catheter anchor
US7682339 *Feb 14, 2006Mar 23, 2010Jms Co., Ltd.Indwelling needle device
US8251975 *Jan 7, 2010Aug 28, 2012Atkins Joseph RCatheter and tunneling device therefor
US8801669 *Jan 9, 2012Aug 12, 2014Irving MizusSystem for access into bodily cavity
US20110202123 *Feb 18, 2010Aug 18, 2011P Tech, LlcAnatomic needle system
US20120109101 *Jan 9, 2012May 3, 2012Irving MizusSystem for access into bodily cavity
USRE31855 *Nov 22, 1982Mar 26, 1985Cook, Inc.Tear apart cannula
EP0125843A2 *May 3, 1984Nov 21, 1984Catheter Technology CorporationApparatus for inserting a catheter
EP0163165A2 *May 4, 1985Dec 4, 1985Peter Dr. Ing. OsypkaAppliance for the transveinous introduction of pacemaker electrodes or the like
WO1991012037A1 *Feb 12, 1991Aug 22, 1991Abdul Mateen AhmedMedical valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/508, 604/160, 606/108
International ClassificationA61M25/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/065
European ClassificationA61M25/06E