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Publication numberUS3599062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1971
Filing dateAug 7, 1967
Priority dateAug 7, 1967
Publication numberUS 3599062 A, US 3599062A, US-A-3599062, US3599062 A, US3599062A
InventorsCrane Burke J, Myers George H, Walker Douglas J
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic control circuit for direct drive automatic
US 3599062 A
Abstract  available in
Images(13)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent ELECTRONIC CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR DIRECT DRIVE AUTOMATIC 8 Claims, 21 Drawing Figs.

Int. Cl 1102p 5/06 FieldofSearclr 318/128,

Primary Examiner0ris L. Rader Assistant Examiner-Robert J. Hickey AttorneysWilliam Houseal, James S. Nettleton, Charles D.

Putnam, Burton H, Baker, Francis L. Snyder, Gene A Heth and Hill, Sherman, Meroni, Gross and Simpson ABSTRACT: A control circuit for a laundry machine motor which generally includes a power circuit coupled with a reversing circuit. A firing angle control circuit regulates the amount of power supply to the motor from the power circuit and the reversing circuit controls the power circuit to establish the desired direction of rotation of the motor. In particular, the reversing circuit is operative to cyclically reverse the 341 motor or to drive the motor in a single direction.

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SHEET 10 [1F 13 WN W IN gm 0 QWM Qw mwN \NN hww Na N ELECTRONIC CONTROL CIRCUIT FOR DIRECT DRIVE AUTOMATIC CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a division of our parent application Ser. No. 487,0l9,filed Sept. 13, 1965.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a laundry machine wherein an oscillatable wash means'is driven by a reversible motor energized by control circuit means characterized by a power circuit coupled with a reversing circuit for reversing the motor cyclically or for operating the motor unidirectionally and regulated by a firing angle control circuit.

2. Description of The Prior Art In the past there have been two general types of automatic laundry machines. These have been the vertical axis type and the horizontal axis type. The vertical axis type has been most widely used in home laundering machines marketed in the United States of America and various other countries where an adequate supply of hot water has been available for laundering operations. The horizontal-type machine has been used in European countries where laundering practices have required the use of much higher water temperatures for laundering operations and where there has'been a definite historical preference for machines of the horizontal type in both home and commercial laundry operations. Horizontal axistype machines have also been widely used in the United States for large commercial washers and extractors where engineering factors and traditional commercial preferences have been somewhat responsible for the selection of this type machine for large scale commercial use.

In both types of machines there is some form of oscillatable wash means for agitating materials to be laundered in the presence ofa washing agent, eitheran agitator or a drum.

In vertical axis washing machines the basket or container for receiving the fabrics to be washed and centrifuged is mounted for rotation on a vertical axis while the washing operation insuch a machine is usually carried out by oscillatory, reciprocatory. or other types of agitating movement of a separate agitator member positioned within the basket or con tainer and on its vertical axis whereas the centrifuging operation is completed by high-speed rotation of the basket or container about that vertical axis to centrifuge most of the water used in the washing operation from the fabrics prior to a subsequent drying operation.

The horizontal axis-type machine ordinarily requires no separate agitator for carrying out a washing operation. In this type machine the clothes-receiving container drum or tumbler which serves as both the means for agitating the clothes and for extracting wash fluid therefrom is mounted for rotation on a horizontal axis even though it is common for machines of this general type to have drums mounted on axes as much as 45' from, the horizontal. In this type machine the washing operation is normally carried out by rotating the drum or tumbler at speeds below those speeds at which the fabrics being cleaned would be pressed by centrifugal forces in fixed positions against the inner periphery of the drum or tumbler during its rotation and yet at speeds high enough to prevent balling of the fabrics within the drum or tumbler during its tumbling operations which may be unidirectional or bidirectional depending upon the nature of the cycle selected. The centrifuging operation in a horizontal-type washing machine or extractor is somewhat similar to that of the vertical axis machine in that extraction of the laundry fluids following the rinsing phase of the washing step is carried out by highspeed rotation of the clothes-receiving drum or tumbler.

While separate motors have been used for carrying out the washing and extracting operations of both vertical axis and horizontal axis machines, factors such as space, weight, simplicity, serviceability, coordinate performance, and product cost have normally been responsible for the use of a single drive motor in both types of machines. Since both types of machines have required varied rotational speeds and movements of the drive members for carrying out the washing and extraction operations, a single drive motor has usually been used in conjunction with various types of motion converting mechanisms for changing rotary motion into oscillatory, reciprocatory, nutational or other types of motion as well as with multiple drive path transmissions, clutches, brakes and complex coordination controllers. Multiple speed motors have also been used.

In addition, even in those instances in which a driven member of a washing machine such as an agitator or drum is moved through a cyclic movement such as an oscillatory or alternating rotary motion during a washing operation, it has not been commercially feasible, or even possible in some cases, to vary the frequency or amplitude of the cyclic stroke or to vary the character or pattern of this movement of v the driven member from a fixed preset character of movement as determined by the design characteristics of the primarily mechanical drive systems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, the oscillatable wash means is driven by a reversible motor and is either cyclically oscillated or unidirectionally rotated. The energization of the motoris effected through a power circuit coupled electrically with a reversing circuit. Voltage at a constant level is supplied to the motor with the assistance of a firing angle control circuit. Sequential control means including a switching means for conditioning 'the electronic drive control in accordance with a preset program permits either cyclic operation or continuous rotation.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a washing machine electronic drive control capable of simplifying or possibly eliminating the need for motion converting mechanisms, multiple drive path transmissions or variable speed transmission normally used in washing operations and to provide a versatile control for rotational movements of vertical axis or horizontal axis laundry machines during their varied rotational or centrifugal extraction operations.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a substantially direct drive, which may or may not incorporate a speed reduction unit, depending upon the torque and speed characteristics of the motor used, from the driving motor to the driven members of a washing machine in which electronic means are employed a to change the speed and directional characteristics of the driven members by controlling the electrical input to the drive motor.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel laundry machine drive system in which the laundry machine's driving motor is directly connected, or substantially directly connected through a speed reduction unit, to its driven members and is controlled by an electronic circuit incorporating solid state components interposed in the energization circuit of the motor.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel electronic circuit for use in the energization circuit of an electric motor which alters the waveform and timing of the electrical energy input supplied to the motor.

' Another object of this invention is to provide a novel energization and control circuit for a drive motor for cyclically reversing the motor.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a novel energization and control circuit for cyclically reversing the motor with deenergization of the motor occurring for a short predetermined period of time just prior to each reversal of the motor.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel control circuit for an electric motor with means for maintaining the motor at a desired preselected constant motor speed under varying loads.

I motor reversing circuit and delay pulse circuit; I r

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electronic motor control circuit for selectively modifying or controlling the stroke rate or frequency of an oscillatable agitator or of another similar driven member movable through a series of alternating rotary movements.

Another object of this invention is to provide an electronic motor control circuit for a laundry machine wherein the arc length or amplitude of the agitator stroke or arcuate drum movement' may be selectively modified or controlled as desired. 7

. Another object of o the present invention is to provide a motor control circuit for a laundry machine having an agitator I or drum wherein means are provided for delaying the initiation of the agitator or drum movements between such successivemovements in order to reduce the intermittent inertial loading of the motor driving the agitator or drum of the laundry machine.

A further object of this invention is to eliminate the necessity of using conventional types of motion converting mechanisms in vertical axis washing machines or the use of complex, multiple path or variable speed transmissions for changing the speed ratios between the motor shaft and the driven members in the operation of horizontal axis laundry machines.

While it may find some applications in other fields, this invention is primarily directed to an electronic drive system for a laundry machine having an oscillatory, rotary, alternating rotary or other similar type of agitation mechanism for carrying out a washing operation and also including a centrifuging mechanism for performing a subsequent liquid extraction or fluid separation mechanism and wherein such agitation and centrifuging mechanisms are driven by a multiple field or multiple armature motor electrically connected to and controlled by an electronic control circuit capable of precisely con trolling and varying the movements of the drive motor and the ultimately driven agitation and centrifuging mechanisms in accordance with a preselected cycle of operation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be more fully realized and understood from'the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals are intended to designate the same or similar structures and wherein:

FIG I is a schematic front view of a laundry machine incorporating our invention and partially broken away to illustrate interior components thereof;

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of an illustrative timer control circuit for the laundry machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a chart illustrating graphically the various machine cycle timer switch positions for the circuit shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a schematic and block diagram of a preferred form of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a preferred embodiment using a split series DC motor and showing those portions of the block diagram of FIG. 4 which are connected by solid lines;

FIG. is a schematic diagram of a preferred embodiment of a motor speed sensor employed in the block diagram of FIG.

FIG. 7 is a schematic diagram of a preferred embodiment of a pulse delay circuit employed in the block diagram of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a graph illustrating a waveform of voltage applied to the motor of FIG. 4 and illustrating more specifically the function of the firing angle circuit;

FIG. 9 is a side view of an agitator showing a clutch mechanism and switching elements in combination with a laundry machine incorporating our invention;

I no. no a a sectional view am along line x-x o fFlG. 9;

FIG. 1 l is a schematic diagram of another embodiment of a FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram of still another embodiment of the power control circuits, motor, and speed control feedback which may be employed in the block diagram illustrated in FIG. 4;

FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram of a power circuit which may be employed in conjunction with the power control circuits illustrated in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a schematic diagram of an alternate form of a firing angle circuit; A

FIG. 15 is a schematic diagram of the power control circuits employed in conjunction with a DC motor operable by electri-.

cally reversing its armature;

FIG. 16 is a schematic diagram of the power control circuits employed in conjunction with a split phase AC motor;

FIG. 17 is a schematic diagram of a power control circuit employed in conjunction with a two-field shunt wound DC motor;

I FIG. 18 is a schematic diagram of the power control circuits employed in conjunction with a three-lead reversible AC motor;

FIG. 19 is a schematic diagram of the power control circuits employed in conjunction with a permanent magnet field motor;

FIG. 20 is a schematic diagram of the power control circuits employed with an AC universal motor; and

FIG. 21 is a schematic diagram of an alternate embodiment of the power control circuit employed in conjunction with a drive motor.

AS SHOWN IN THE DRAWINGS In FIG. 1 of the drawings, there is diagrammatically illustrated a vertical axis washing machine 25 which includes a cabinet 26, a stationary tub 27,'a rotatable clothes basket 28 (centrifuging mechanism) and an agitator 29 (agitation mechanism). An electric drive motor 30 is selectively connected through a suitable clutch mechanism 31 to the basket 28 and the agitator 29. Interposed between the motor 30 and the clutch mechanism 31 is a fixed gear reduction box or belt reduction unit 32 which may be used in the event the speed or torque characteristics of the. motor require it. It is to be understood that there is thus a direct drive from the motor 30 to either the basket 28 or the agitator 29 depending upon the position of clutch mechanism 31 to be described in greater detail hereinafter. I

The washing machine 25 also includes a drain 33 connected to the tub 27' and a drain pump 34 operated by an associated pump drive motor 35. Automatic cycling mechanism, including timer motor 56, for sequentially performing the desired operations of the washer is initially actuated by a timer control knob 36. Washing fluid is supplied to the washing machine 25 through a supply pipe 37 which is controlled by a suitable solenoid operated shut-off valve 38.

The specific clutch mechanism 31 and the mechanical support and arrangement of the basket 28 and the agitator form no part of the present invention, but may, by way of example, be of the type which is illustrated and described in the pending application of Glen A. Severance, Clifton A. Coff and William F. Robandt, Ser. No. 381,621, and assigned to the same assignee as the present invention. A suitable clutch mechanism is diagrammatically illustrated, however, in FIG. 9 of the drawings. As shown in FIG. 9, the tub 27 is provided with a hollow center post 39 which rises to a point above the normal liquid level of the tub. The basket 28 is provided with a central upstanding portion 40 which is nested over the center post 39 and is integrally connected to a hollow drive shaft 41 which is disposed within the center post 39. The agitator 29 is disposed within the basket and includes a post portion 42 which is nested over the upstanding portion 40 of the basket 28. The

which is integrally connected to and forms a continuation of the drive shaft 44 coming from the gear reduction 32 of the motor so. It will beunderstood am the agitator 2s a all times hasthessmemotionssthedriveshaft. q j Y The hollow basket drive shaft 41 is arranged to have limited vertical movement in addition to its rotational movement. Its lower end is provided with a clutch plate 45 having suitable clutch pads 46 on its lower surface. The peripheral edge of the clutch plate 45 is frustoconical and provided with a brake surface 47 which engages a cooperating complementary surface 48 on the stationary frame of the washer 25. A second clutch plate 49 is slidably mounted on the agitator drive shaft 43 and splined thereto so that it is driven at all times by the agitator drive shaft 43 but may be moved vertically with respect thereto. The upper surface of this second clutch plate 49 is provided with suitable clutch pads 50 which mate with the clutch pads 46 of the upper plate 45 when clutch plate 49 is in its upper position. The lower clutch plate 49 is arranged to be raised by any suitable mechanism 51 upon energization of an electric solenoid 52.

From the diagrammatic illustration in FIG. 9, it will be seen that when the solenoid 52 is energized, the lower clutch plate 49 is raised to cause the clutch pads 48 and 50 to mate and additionally the hollow basket drive shaft 41 is raised sufficiently so as to lift the peripheral edge 47 out of braking engagement with the stationary brake surface 48. The basket 28 under these circumstances is directly driven by the motor 30 as is also the agitator 29. There is no relative rotational motion between the basket 28 and the agitator 29. When the solenoid 52 is deenergized, the lower clutch plate 49 drops down to disengage the mating clutch pads 46 and 50 and to cause the peripheral portion 47 of the clutch plate 45 to engage the braking surface 48 of the stationary frame. Under these circumstances, the agitator 29 will be directly driven by the motor 30 but the basket 28 will be stationary. Thus, if the motor is periodically reversed, the agitator is periodically reversed.

A timer control circuit for the washing machine above described is illustrated schematically in H6. 2 of the drawings. The main washing machine motor and its associated control circuit, represented by the block MC, are arranged to be energized through power supply conductors 53 and 54 from a conventional l lS-volt 60-cycle alternating current source. A master switch 55 under the control of axially movable knob 36 is preferably interposed in the electric supply line. The cycling operation is under the control of a timer motor56 which drives a cam shaft 57 having a plurality of cams 58, 59, 60, 61 and 62 thereon. These cams 58 to 62 are arranged to close associated switches 63 to 67, respectively, for predetermined periods at predetermined times during the cycle of operation, these periods and times being shown by the chart shown by FIG. 3. The actual timing of the cycle does not start until the tub 27 has been filled with water to its desired washing level. The water level is controlled by a float switch arm 68 which engages a contact 69 in its low water level position and engages a contact 70 when the water level within the tub 27 has reached its desired height for washing.

As is common practice, the main timer control knob 38 has limited axial movement as well as rotational movement. Depression of the knob 36 in an axial direction closes the master switch 55 while rotational movement sets the desired length of the washing period. The shut-off valve 38 in the water fill line 37 is energized through cam switch 63 and float switch 69. Thus when the control knob 36 is moved to start a cycle of operation, master switch 55 is closed and cam 58 is advanced to close switch 63. Shut-off valve 38 is now energized and, hence, opened and water beings to flow through supply pipe 37. Water continues to flow into tub 27 through conduit 37 until float switch arm 68 moves from contact 69 to contact 70. At a period of time longer than that necessary to fill tub 27 cam 58 causes switch 63 to open. Movement of switch arm 68 to contact 70 actually starts the timing cycle since timer motor 56 is arranged to be energized through switch arm 68 and contact 70. Since the timer motor 56 must At the time the float switch arm 68 energizes the timer motor 56, cam switch 67 is closed to energize the main motor 30 and its associated control circuit MC.

The movable clutch plate 49 (FIG. 9) which connects the clothes basket 28 to the drive shaft 44 is controlled by solenoid 52. This solenoid 52 is arranged to be energized through cam switch 64. The pump 35 which causes withdrawal of water from tub 27 is energized through cam switch 66.

From a consideration of the simplified and illustrative chart in FIG. 3, it will be seen that after the main motor 30 is started through switch 67, the agitator 29 will be driven by the main motor 30 for a predetermined period of time. It will then be deenergized and cam switch 66 will energize pump 35 to withdraw water from tub 27. Cam switch 64 will then be closed so that when the water has reached its low level position, switch arm 68 will be moved back against contact 69 and clutch solenoid 52 will be energized to connect basket 28 to drive shaft 44. Simultaneously the main motor 30 and its control circuit MC will be energized through connectors 54 and 71, and the basket 28 and agitator 29 will be rotated together by the main motor 30 during a centrifugal extraction or spin period. At the end of the centrifugal extraction or spin period switch 65 opens to deenergize the time motor 56 after cam switch 63 has closed to reopen fill valve 38. This causes refilling of the tub 27 with water for the rinse cycle. When the tub has been filled, switch 68 arm again closes against contact 70 to energize the timer motor 56. The timer then advances the cam shaft 57 to close main motor cam switch 67 and an operation similar to the previous wash and spin cycle then follows with the exception that the rinse cycle is shorter than the wash cycle. At the end of the final spin cycle the timer motor 56 leaves all of its associated cam switches 63, 64, 65, 66 and 67 in an open position. As will be described in greater detail hereinafter, timer 56 also controls switches 107, 129, 130, 137, 190, 191 and 196.

The details of the above-described cycling circuit have been only briefly described, since it is quite conventional in substance.

The motor and control circuit MC referred to in FIG. 2 is illustrated in expanded block diagram form in FIG. 4.

A power source 72 is connected through a power circuit 73 to a current sensor 74 and the reversing motor 30. The power circuit 73, when properly triggered or gated, supplies voltage continue to operate except during periods when the tub 27 is being filled with water, timer motor 56 must have an additional energization circuit. This is accomplished by switch 65 under control of cam 60 which provides a circuit in parallel with float switch 68 in accordance with the profile of cam 60.

to the reversing motor 30. The current sensor 74 functions as a safety for the reversing motor 30 by sensing excessive currents passing therethrough. The mechanical reduction 32 is connected between an output of the reversing motor 30 and the basket 28 and agitator 29. A motor reversing signal is produced on a line 75 during rotation of the basket 28 or of the agitator 29.

The motor-reversing signal may be produced by limit switches connected in the drive system of the basket 28 and agitator 29. If desired, a separate motor oscillation control circuit may be provided which may include an electronic relaxation oscillator in conjunction with a flip-flop control for producing the motor-reversing signal on the line 75.

The power source 72 is also connected to a line voltage sensor 76 and to a firing angle control circuit 77. The line voltage sensor 76 responds to changes in line voltage to alter the amount of applied voltage to the reversing motor 30. The firing angle control circuit 77 accurately controls the time within each cycle of the power source voltage when the power circuit 73 will be triggered to supply voltage to the reversing motor 30.

The firing angle control circuit77 more particularly determines the firing angle at which the power circuit 73 will be triggered to supply voltage to the reversing motor 30. That is, the firing angle control circuit 77 has direct control, through the power circuit 73, of the voltage applied to the reversing motor 30.

A motor-reversing circuit 78 is interposed between the firing angle control circuit 77 and the power circuit 73 for selecting the direction of rotation of the reversing motor 30. The motor-reversing circuit 78 is actuated by the motor-reversing signal on the line 75 which is operative only during the agitate cycle of the machines operation and is disabled during the spin cycle.

The firing angle control circuit 77, in addition to being independently operative, is controlled from the line voltage sensor 76 and the current sensor 74. In addition, an output voltage sensor 79 is connected between the power circuit 73 and the firing angle control circuit 77 for sensing the voltage supplied through the power circuit 73 to the reversing motor 30, and performs to control the firing angle control circuit accordingly.

If desired, a delay pulse circuit 80 may be connected between the motor-reversing circuit 78 and the firing angle control circuit 77 for delaying the application of voltage to the reversing motor 30 upon each reversal of the direction of rotation of the reversing motor 30. 1 The purpose of the delay pulse circuit 80 is to provide a means for avoiding the sudden application of a reverse magnetic force to the motor following the end of its movement in one direction and prior to its reversal. This delay pulse circuit 80 provides a brief period of no applied power to the motor 30 each time the motor-reversing circuit 78 operates to reverse the rotation of the motor 30.

Furthermore, a motor speed sensor 81 may be provided between the reversing motor 30 and the firing angle control circuit 77 for maintaining the speed of the reversing motor 30 within a prescribed range.

More particularly, the motor speed sensor 81 operates to maintain a constant predetermined speed of the motor 30 regardless of the load imposed thereomThe motor speed sensor 81 may take the form of a voltage-current sensitive circuit that is affected by the current through the motor and the voltage thereacross to provide a correction to the firing angle control circuit 77 to compensate for the load imposed on the motor 30. The motor speed sensor 81 may also take the form of a tech-generator system responsive to the speed of the motor 30 and adjusting the power input by controlling the firing angle control circuit 77. It is to be understood, however, that other forms of a motor speed sensor may be employed to provide a constant speed control. At this point in the circuit, a means for providing adjustable speed control may also be utilized. The delay pulse circuit 80 and the motor speed sensor 81 are shown connected into the block diagram of FIG. 4 with dashed lines to indicate that such circuits are not required, but optional.

One preferred form of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. wherein the power source 72 is connected to the lines 54,71 as shown in FIG. 2 and to the power circuit 73. The power circuit 73 includes a pair of positive cycle conducting silicon-controlled rectifiers 82 and 83 having respective anodes thereof connected to the line 71. A pair of negative cycle conducting silicon-controlled rectifiers 84 and 85 have respective anodes thereof connected to the line 54. The cathodes of the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82,84 are connected together and to a line 86 as one output of the power circuit 73. Similarly, the cathodes of the silicon-controlled rectifiers 83,85 are connected to a line 87 forming a second output of the power circuit 73. A pair of circuit return rectifiers 88 and 89 are provided within the power circuit 73. A turn-on transient suppressor capacitor 90 is connected between the lines 54,71 for protecting the semiconductors within the power circuit 73 and for suppressing the occasional line transients which might accidentally fire silicon-controlled rectifiers 82, 83, 84 or 85 within the power circuit 73. Also, a pair of transient suppressing semiconductor diodes 91 and 91a are provided within the power circuit 73.

When the siliconcontrolled rectifier 82 is triggered on, positive pulses of the power source 72 are supplied on the line 86, causing current flow through the circuit which returns on a line 92 connected to the anodes of the diodes 88,89. These positive pulses cause a return current flow through the diode 89. Similarly, when the silicon-controlled rectifier 84 is triggered on, negative pulses of the power source 72 will be provided on the line 86 as positive pulses, causing a current flow through the remaining circuitry to return on the line 92 and pass through the diode 88 to the line 71. In a like manner, when the silicon-controlled rectifier 83 is triggered on, positive pulses of the power source 72 on the line 71 are conducted to the line 87 and cause a current flow through the circuit to return on the line 92 and through the diode 89 to the opposite side of the power source 72 on the line 54. The silicon-controlled rectifier 85, when triggered on, conducts negative pulses from the power source 72 on the line 54 to the line 87 as positive pulses and causes a current flow through the circuit to return on the line 92 and through the diode 88 to the opposite side of the power source 72 on the line 71. Therefore, the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82,84, during one phase of the operation, form a full wave bridge rectifier circuit with the diodes 88,89 which has an output developed across the lines 86,92. Similarly, the silicon-controlled rectifiers 83,85, during a second phase of the operation, for a full wave rectifier bridge with the diodes 88,89 to provide an output across the lines 87,92.

A pair of transformers T and T, transfer the necessary triggering pulses to the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82-85. More particularly, a. pair of secondary windings 93 and 94 of the transformer T, are connected to respective gate electrodes of the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82,84. Also, a pair of secondary windings 95 and 96 of the transformer T, are connected to respective gate electrodes of the silicon-controlled rectifiers 83,85. When a pulse is developed within the respective trans formers, the corresponding silicon-controlled rectifiers will be triggered on allowing full rectification of the power source 72 voltage on either one of the output lines 86,87.

The reversing motor 30, which in this embodiment is illustrated as being a split series DC motor, includes an armature 97 and a pair of field windings 98 and 99. The output line 86 from the power circuit 73 is connected through the field winding 98 to the armature 97. Similarly, the output line 87 from the power circuit 73 is connected through the field winding 99 to the armature 97. Therefore, it can be readily appreciated that when the transformer T is pulsed, the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82,84 will be triggered on, supplying current to the field winding 98 and the armature 97. in a like manner, when thetransformer T, is pulsed, the silicon-controlled rectifiers 83,85 will be triggered on, supplying current through the field winding 99 and the annature 97. The field windings 98,99 are wound such that energization of one of the field windings 98,99 will drive the armature 97 in one direction, while energization of the other of the field windings 98,99 will drive the armature 97 in the opposite direction.

A switch 107' is connected to the field winding 99 and performs to short out a portion of the field winding 99 during spin operation of the complete cycle, thereby driving the armature 97 at a higher speed. The switch 107, as shown in FIG. 5, is in the agitate position and is actuatable by a cam 108 driven from the timer motor 56. As will be more readily appreciated hereinbelow, during the spin operation of the machines complete cycle, only the field winding 99 is supplied voltage so that the armature 97 will be driven in the same direction continuously. However, during the agitate cycle of the machine's operation, voltage is alternately supplied first to one of the field windings 98,99 and then to the other of the field windings 98,99.

The armature 97 is connected through the mechanical reduction 32 to either the basket 28 during spin operation or to the agitator 29 during agitate operation.

The current sensor circuit 74 is connected in series with the reversing motor 30 and provides a safety feature by sensing excessive currents through the field windings 98,99 and the armature 97. The current-sensing circuit 74 includes a motor current sensing resistor 100 connected in series with the armature 97 and which resistor 100 developes a voltage thereacross proportional to the current flowing through the motor 30. The voltage developed across the resistor 100 is filtered by means of a resistor 101 and a capacitor 102 and is supplied through a diode 103 to the firing angle control circuit 77. The diode 103 conducts on excessive current peaks to provide a signal to the firing angle control circuit 77 during such excessive current periods.

The outputs of the power circuit 73 on the lines 86,87 are connected to the output voltage sensor 79 which senses the amount of voltage supplied to the motor during a particular cycle. More particularly, the output line 86 is connected to a resistor 104 and the output line 87 is connected to a resistor 105 in the voltage-sensing circuit 79. The two motor voltagesensing resistors 104,105 are each connected to a filter circuit including a capacitor 106 and a potentiometer 109. The movable arm of the potentiometer 109, which is a manual speed selector for the circuit, is connected through a resistor 110 to the firing angle control circuit 77. In this manner, voltage supplied to the motor 30 is sensed in the potentiometer 109 and such voltage is delivered through the resistor 110 to the firing angle control circuit 77 to provide a signal in accordance with the voltage supplied to the motor 30. More particularly, when the motor 30 is being driven in one direction as by energization of the field winding 98, the voltage developed on the output line 86 is fed through the resistor 104 and filtere'd by the capacitor 106 and potentiometer 109, and a signal corresponding to the voltage on the line 86 is fed through the resistor 110 to the firing angle control circuit 77 Similarly, when the motor 30 is being driven in the opposite direction, as by energization of the field winding 99, the voltage developed on the line 87 is fed through the resistor 105 to the capacitor 106 and potentiometer 109, and a signal corresponding thereto is supplied through the resistor 110 to the firing angle control circuit 77.

'The firing angle control circuit 77 includes a unijunction transistor 111 which delivers a pulse to the motor-reversing circuit 78 when a predetermined voltage level is achieved at the emitter electrode thereof. The time required for developing such a voltage level which will trigger the unijunction transistor 111' into conduction to deliver the required pulse is determined by that circuitry which controls the charge developed on a capacitor 112 connected to the emitter electrode of the unijunction transistor 1 1 1. I

Thecharge developed on the capacitor 112 is primarily derived from the voltage developed at a midpoint between a pair of resistors 113 and 114 connected across the power source 72 on the lines 54, 71. The midpoint between the two resistors 113,114 is connected to a voltage clipper circuit including a diode 115, a. capacitor 116, and a resistor 117. The voltage developed by the clipper circuit is supplied through a resistor 118 to charge the capacitor 1 12 to a level sufficient to fire the unijunction transistor 111. Upon firing of the unijunction transistor 111, however, the charge developed on the capacitor 112 is completely dissipated and when the unijunction transistor 111 returns to a quiescent state, the capacitor 112 is free to develop a charge again. This described circuitry for charging the capacitor 1 12, however, will develop a trigger voltage for the unijunction transistor 11] within a prescribed time determined by the RC time constant of the circuit which will not vary. Therefore, in order to vary the charging time of the capacitor 112, a transistor 119 is provided in the circuit which is of the NPN type.

Theemitter electrode of the transistor 119 is connected through a resistor 120 to the return line 92, and the collector electrode thereof is connected through a resistor 121 to the midpoint between the two resistors 113,114. In addition, a diode 122 is connected from the collector electrode of the transistor 119 to the capacitor 112 which is poled to conduct only in a charging direction on the capacitor 112. The value of the resistors 118,121 have a predetermined ratio with respect to one another such that the conduction state of the transistor 119 will affect the charge on the capacitor 112. Therefore, when the transistor 119 is in a conductive state, most of the charge developed on the capacitor 112 will be derived from a current'flow only through the resistor 1 18. However, when the transistor 119 is in a nonconductive state, most of the charge developed on the capacitor 112 will be derived from a current flow through the resistor 121 and the diode 122. The values of the two resistors 118,121 are such that when the transistor 119 is nonconducting, the capacitor 112 will charge in a relatively short time, and when the transistor 119 is conducting, the capacitor 112 will charge over a relatively long period of time. Therefore, the time periods between successive triggerings of the unijunction transistor 111 can be varied and controlled by controlling the conduction state of the transistor 119.

The base 1 of the unijunction transistor 111'is connected through a resistor 123 to the return line 92. The base 2 electrode of the unijunction transistor 111 is connected through a variable resistor 124 to the midpoint of the two resistors 1 13,114. By such connection of the unijunction transistor 111 into the circuit, a voltage pulse is developed on a line 125 with each successive firing'of the unijunction transistor 111. This pulse developed on the line 125 is supplied to the motorreversing circuit 78 to be utilized for controlling the power circuit 73.

The motor-reversing circuit 78 includes a primary winding 126 of the transformer T and a primary winding 127 of the transformerT A magnetic reed switch 128 is provided in the circuit and is directly controllable from the position of the agitator and basket 28, 29, as will be more fully understood hereinbelow. The line 125 carrying the pulses from the firing angle control circuit 77 is connected through each of the primary windings 126,127 to the respective contact of the magnetic-reed switch 128. The movable contact of the magnetic reed switch 128 is connected through a switch 129 to the return line 92. A second switch 130 is provided between the primary winding 127 and the return line 92.

As shown in FIG. 5, the switches 129,130 are disposed in the agitate position such that agitate operation may be performed by the circuit. A cam 131 controls the position of the switch 129, and a cam 132 controls the position of the switch 130. The cams 131,132 are driven by the timer motor 56. During the spin operation of the machine's cycle, the switches 129,130 are moved to the other position from that shown in the drawing. More particularly, actuation of the switch 129 to the spin position removes the magnetic reed switch 128 from the circuit and actuation of the switch 130 to the spin position locks the primary winding 127 into the circuit continuously. Therefore, during the agitate cycle of the machine's operation, pulses developed on the line 125 may be supplied to either the primary winding 126 or to the primary winding 127 depending upon the position of the magnetic reed switch 128. However, during the spin cycle of the machine's operation, pulses developed on the line 125 are supplied only through the primary winding 127.

These pulses developed in the primary windings 126,127 are transformer-coupled to the respective secondary windings 93-96 to provide power to the motor 30. When the magnetic read switch 128 is in the position as shown in the drawing, pulses are developed in the primary winding 127 of the transformer T and such pulses are transfonner-coupled to the secondary windings 95,96. These pulses then gate on the silicon-controlled rectifiers 83,85 to supply power to the field winding 99. However, when the magnetic reed switch 128 is in the opposite position from that shown, pulses on the line 125 are supplied to the primary winding 126 of the transformer T and are transformer-coupled to the secondary windings 93,94 to gate on the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82,84 and supply power to the field winding 98. As previously mentioned, the field winding 98, when energized, drives the armature 97 in one direction, while the field winding 99 drives the armature 97 in the opposite direction. The reed switch 128 is'controllable from the position of either the agitator or the basket as described in connection with FIGS. 9 and 10.

Another input provided for the firing angle control circuit 77 is from the line voltage sensor 76 which includes a resistor 133 connected between the diode 115 and the base electrode of the transistor 119. Therefore, as the line voltage increases across the lines 54,71, the conduction level of the transistor 119 is increased thereby compensating'for the increased voltage employed for charging the capacitor 112.

In operation, the circuit of FIG. performs to control the movement of the basket 28 or the agitator 29 by controlling the motor 30. More particularly, the field windings 98,99 of the motor 30 are selectively energized to provide the desired control over the basket 28 or the agitator 29. Line voltage from the power source 72 is supplied to the firing'angle control circuit 77 to charge the capacitor 112 over a predetermined time period. When the capacitor 112 charges to the level required for firing the unijunction transistor 111 the pulse developed will be coupled through pulse transformer T to secondary windings 93 and 94 or through pulse transformer T, to secondary windings 95 and 96. Pulses applied to pulse transformer T will fire either siliconcontrolled rectifier 82 or 84 depending on anode to cathode voltage polarity, while pulses applied to pulse transformer T, will fire either silicon-controlled rectifier 83 or 85, again depending on anode to cathode voltage polarity. Alternate firing of silicon-controlled rectifiers 82 and 84 will supply power to field winding 98 to drive motor 30 in one direction while alternate firing of silicon-controlled rectifiers 83 and 85 will supply power to field winding 99 to drive motor 30 in the opposite direction. The position of the reed switch 128 determines which of the field windings 98,99 will be energized at a particular time. Further control of the energization of the field windings 98,99 is provided by the switches 129,130, which when actuated to the spin position allow energization of the field winding 99 only. When the switches 129,130 are placed in the spin position, however, the switch 107 shorts out a portion of the field winding 99 causing the motor 30 to operate at a higher speed. Actuation of the switches 107, 129, and 130 to the agitate position is illustrated by the solid black lines in FIG. 3.

The circuit illustrated in FIG. 5 provides three inputs to the firing angle control circuit 77 for controlling the conduction of the transistor 119 and thereby controlling the charging rate of the capacitor 112. One of these inputs is from the current sensor 74 which senses excessive current to the motor 30 and causes the firing angle control circuit 77 to reduce the amount of voltage supplied to the motor 30. Another input to the firing angle control 77 is from the output voltage sensor 79 which provides an input to the transistor 119 proportional to the amount of voltage supplied to the motor 30. If the voltage supplied to the motor 30 increases, the conduction of the transistor 119 is also increased causing the firing angle control circuit 77 to supply a lesser amount of voltage to the motor 30. The third input to the firing angle control circuit 77 is from the line voltage sensor 76 which also increases the conduction of the transistor 119 with increased line voltage. I

As the conduction of the transistor 119 increases, the time required for charging the capacitor 112 increases proportionally delaying the triggering of the unijunction transistor 111. Therefore, the silicon-controlled rectifiers 82-85 do not begin conduction until the capacitor 112 has charged to the required level to fire the unijunction transistor 11 1.

One preferred form of the motor speed sensor 81 is illustrated in FIG. 5 and a portion of the circuit of FIG. 5 is incorporated therein for showing the proper connection of the motor speed sensor 81 into the circuit. The motor speed sensor 81 provides another input to the firing angle control circuit 77. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the motor speed sensor 81 includes a resistor 134 connected in series with the resistor 100 of the current sensor 74 and connected to the current return line 92. Connected in parallel with the armature 97, the resistor 100, and the resistor 134 are a pair of resistors 135 and 136. A common connection between the resistors 135,136 is connected through a switch 137 in the agitate position and through a pair of diodes 138,and 139 to the base electrode of the transistor 1 19 of the firing angle control circuit 77 Filter capacitors 140 and 141 are connected from the anodes of the respective diodes 139 to a common connection between the resistors 100, The switch 137 is controlled by a cam 142 connected to the timer motor 56 and actuatable in a like manner with the switch 107. The spin position of the switch 137 connects a tap of the resistor 136 through the diodes 138,139 to the firing angle control circuit 77.

The armature 97 and the resistors 100, 134, 135, and 136 constitute a bridge-type circuit for sensing and controlling the speed of the motor 30 which speed can be determined by the following formula:

Motor Speed n rs4( 1ss/ iss)( ioo)]r in which K,,, motor constant,

R,,= resistance of armature 97,

R resistance of the resistor 134,

R resistance of the resistor 135, and

R resistance of the resistor 136.

This formula is derived form the following:

Motor speed E ll K,,,, in which E, armature reaction I, armature current K,,, motor constant The above apply for a series DC motor in which the field is not saturated.

The output voltage is always about the same regardless of motor speed. However, since the circuit including the resistors 134, 135, 136 is a bridge network, a change in speed from the desired speed will cause a change in this output voltage. It is this change that is amplified by transistor 119 to control motor speed.

The switch 137, when actuated to the spin position, alters the R /R, factor in the above formula and consequently alters the signal supplied to the transistor 119 to allow increased motor speed. The output of the bridge circuit is altered by the position of the switch 137 such that in the agitate position thereof, a greater output is derived than that derived in the spin position thereof. These two outputs provide, during their respective cycles, a fourth input to the firing angle control circuit 77 to maintain the speed of the motor 30 within a prescribed range.

The preferred embodiment of the delayed pulse circuit is illustrated in FIG. 7 and is shown in combination with the firing angle control circuit 77 and the motor-reversing circuit 78. Employment of the delay pulse circuit 80, in the general combination of the present invention, requires the removal of the resistor 123 from the circuit illustrated in FIG. 5. With that exception, all other components of FIG. 5 are retained and the delay pulse circuit 80 is provided in the circuit for delaying the application of voltage to the motor 30 during a reversal thereof and until the armature 97 has completed its movement in one direction and prior to its movement in the opposite direction.

As illustrated in FIG. 7, a voltage is derived from the clipper circuit including the diode 115, the capacitor 116, and the resistor 117, which voltage is provided to a pair of resistors 143 and 144. The base 1 of the unijunction transistor 111 is connected through the primary windings 126,127 and through a pair of diodes 145 and 146 respectively, to opposite contacts of the reed switch 128.

As in FIG. 5, when the reed switch 128 and the switches 129,130 are in the positions shown, a pulse developed by the triggering of the unijunction transistor 111 will be supplied through the primary winding 127 of the transformer T, to induce a gating pulse in the secondary windings 95,96 (FIG. 5). When the reed switch 128 is in the opposite position from that shown in FIG. 7, however, a pulse developed by the triggering of the unijunction transistor 111 will be developed across the primary winding 126 of the transformer T, and transformercoupled to the secondary windings 93,94 to gate on the silicon controlled rectifiers 82,84.

As also described in conjunction with FIG. 5, when the switches 129,130 are disposedin the opposite position from that shown in FIG. 7, pulses developed by the triggering of the unijunction transistor 111 will only be realized in the primary

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Classifications
U.S. Classification318/281, 318/752
International ClassificationD06F37/30, H02P7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F37/304, H02P7/0044
European ClassificationH02P7/00E1, D06F37/30C