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Publication numberUS359959 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1887
Publication numberUS 359959 A, US 359959A, US-A-359959, US359959 A, US359959A
InventorsL. D. metallic
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallic shingle or roofing-plate
US 359959 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T H G l. R T R O G 9 L a d 0 M 0 W METALLIG SHINGLE 0R ROOFING PLATE.

No. 359,959. Patented Mar. 22,1887.

N. PCYERS, Photo-Uthngradwr. Wuhinghn. D4 CY llnirno STATES PATENT @rrrcn TO TH E CORT- RIGHT METAL ROOFING COMPANY, OF PENNSYLVANIA.

METALLIC SHINGLE OR ROOFING-PLATE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 359,959, dated March 22, 1887.

Application filed January 3,1887. Serial No. 22332 4. (No norlcl.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Lnwrs D. CORTRIGHT, of Hyde Park, Cook county, State of Illinois, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Metallic Shingles or Roofing-Plates,of which the following is a true and exact description, due reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part hereof.

My invention relates to roofing-plates of the class which are laid in successive rows from the caves to the comb of the roof, and has for its object to provide a seam or joint for the plates which shall be at the same time simple and tight, providing especially against the action ofthe capillary tendency, which is the most troublesome cause of leakage in roofingplates of this kind.

Reference being had to the drawings which illustrate my invention, Figure 1 shows four of my improved shingles interlocked together as they are laid upon a roof. Fig. 2 is aview of the under side of one of my shingles; Fig. 3, a section of the joint between two shingles, taken on the line mm, Fig. 1; Fig. 4, a section through one of the upper edges of my shingle, as on the line y y, Fig. 1; Fig. 5, a section through one of the lower edges of my shingles, as on the line .2 c, Fig. 1; Fig. 6, an enlarged view of the lower point of my shingle from the under side; Fig. 7, a perspective View of the central point of the three lower shingles shown in Fig. 1, the upper one being removed; and

Fig. 8, an enlarged view of this same point with the upper shingle in place.

A, B, O, and D are four of my shingles, which I prefer to make square, as shown, though other symmetrical equilateral figures may be used, and my improvedjoint may even be used with advantage on metallic shingles the seams of which run in vertical lines.

The two upper edges of inyimproved shingles are bent so as to form an elevated and backwardly-pointing flange, F, the extreme edge of the sheet forming the nailingfianges f. The flanges F are preferably formed, asshowu in the drawings, so that they rise at a right angle from the plate, and when at some distancesay from one-eighth to one-fourth of an inchabove'the plate turn abruptly backward and run parallel to the sheet. The two lower edges of my sheets are bent downward and inward in the reverse direction to the flange F, forming hooks E, the points 6 of which are adapted to rest againstor near to the bottom of the flange F, the bent portion being substantially equal to the direct distance between the point and the base ofsaid flange F. (See Fig. 3. At the lower points, a, of my shingles I prefer to bend the flange E at nearly a right angle, and round it out, as shown, by which construction the point (L of the upper shingle comes in contact, or nearly so, with the surface of the shingle below it, and the joints are better protected at the corners against water being driven into them by the wind.

I consider it a great advantage to set my improved shingles -in the slightly-staggered manner shown,as the water flowing down the seams is thus thrown onto the surface of the sheet below, and there is not the same tendency for it to follow the seams as there is when they run in unbroken lines across the roof.

The union of the high abrupt flange F and the oblique flange E leaves a clear open space, 0, within the seam, and the surfaces of the two flanges do not run parallel to each other on the side of the seam exposed to the weather. As will be readily understood, this form of scam has no capillary tendency, there being nothing to attract the water into the seam or lead it through the seam, as in cases where the interlocked flanges of the joint lie parallel and close together. lVhile I prefer to make the flange F with rightangle bends, it may be bent at a somewhat different angle, or even curved, the main point being that the chambercshould be preserved in all cases.

It will be remarked that in the construction shown and described the surface of the overlapping shingle does not approach the nailingflangef, which, together with the side of the flange F, forms an inclined gutter, 0', inside the seam, this gutter leading any water which may get into it onto the surface of the plate below in the same way as does the gutter c. The distance between the nailing-flange and the overlapping plate is so great that there is no capillary tendency to draw the water to ward the edge of the flangef and onto the supporting structure. This feature of my invention is capable of use even when the seam itself is quite different from that hereinbefore ICC 7 claim as new, and

roofplates. Even when the seam is vertical the small quantity of water in gutter 0 will be drawn by capillarity toward the upwardlyextending flange F, and will not overflow the edge of the nailing-flangef, if the overlying plate is kept far enough away from said nail ing-flange to prevent its exercising a capillary influence.

Having now described my invent-ion, what I desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. Ina metallic shingle or roofing-plate, one or more edges bent to form an upwardly-extending flange and continued to form a nailing flange, said flanges being extended downward, so as to overlie the surface of the plate below, in combination with corresponding edges adapted to extend over the upwardlyextending flanges and form a seam on the inside thereof, but not come in contact with or approach the nailingtlange at all, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

2. In a metallic shingle or roofing-plate having four equilateral. sides, the combination of an upwardlyextcnding flange formed on two adjacent upper edges of the shingle and continued to form nailing-flanges, said flanges being extended downward, so as to overlie the surface of the shingle or plate below, with the two adjacent lower edges of the shingle adapted to extend over the upper-edge flanges of adjoining shingles and form seams on the inside thereof, substantially as and for the purpose specified. 4

3. In a metallic shingleor roofing-plate, one or more edges bent into a flange, F, extending up and backward over the plate and con: tinued to form a nailing-flange, f, in combination with corresponding downward and inwardly-bent edges E, adapted to engage with the flanges F of similar sheets, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

4. In a metallic shingle or roofing-plate, one or more edges bent into a flange, F, extending up and backward over the plate and continued to form a nailing-flangeJ', said ,flange being continued. downward, so as to overlie the surfaces of the shingle or plate below, in combination with downward andinwardlybent edges E, adapted to engage with the flanges F of similar sheets, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

5. In a metallic shingle or roofing-plate having four equilateral. sides, the combination of flanges F, extending up and backward over the plate and continued to form the nailing flangesf on the two upper adjacentsideawith the flanges E, extending inward and downward in the two lower adjacent sides, allsubstantially as and for the purpose specified.

6. A metallic shingle or roofing-plate having four equilateral sides, the combination of 7 flanges F, extending up and backward over the plate and continued to form the nailing flanges f on the two upper adjacent sides, said flanges being continued downwardgso as to overlie the surface of the shingle or plate below, with the flanges E, extending inward and downward in the two lower adjacent sides, all substantially as and for the purpose specified.

7. A metallic shingle or roofing-plate hav: ing the hooked flanges F and nailing-flanges f in its two adjacent upper edges, the QUITE". sponding hooked flangesE in its adjacent lower edges, and having its point a formed by bending the flange E toor nearly to a right angle with the plate, suhstantiallyias and for the purpose specified.

LEWIS D. C OIi-TRIGHT.

lVitnesses:

S. P. DARLINGTON, ANDREW ZANE, Jr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6173546Aug 28, 1998Jan 16, 2001James P SchaferInterlocking metal shingle
US6619006 *Mar 28, 2002Sep 16, 2003Muneyasu ShirotaRoofing shingle
US6883290Feb 20, 2002Apr 26, 2005Powerlight CorporationShingle system and method
US7178295Feb 20, 2002Feb 20, 2007Powerlight CorporationShingle assembly
US8215071Feb 2, 2011Jul 10, 2012Sunpower CorporationIntegrated composition shingle PV system
US20030154666 *Feb 20, 2002Aug 21, 2003Dinwoodie Thomas L.Shingle system and method
US20030154667 *Feb 20, 2002Aug 21, 2003Dinwoodie Thomas L.Shingle system
US20030154680 *Feb 20, 2002Aug 21, 2003Dinwoodie Thomas L.Shingle assembly
US20110185652 *Feb 2, 2011Aug 4, 2011Sunpower CorporationIntegrated Composition Shingle PV System
EP1247919A1 *Mar 26, 2002Oct 9, 2002KM Europa Metal AGRoof or facade covering
WO2012156555A1 *Apr 19, 2012Nov 22, 2012Ingenieria Y Construccion Del Perfil, S.A.Metal panel for producing architectonic facades
Classifications
International ClassificationE04D1/18
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/125, E04D1/18
European ClassificationE04D1/12D, E04D1/18