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Publication numberUS3599974 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 17, 1971
Filing dateDec 11, 1968
Priority dateDec 11, 1968
Publication numberUS 3599974 A, US 3599974A, US-A-3599974, US3599974 A, US3599974A
InventorsPrice David D
Original AssigneePrice David D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
A friction-type exercising device
US 3599974 A
Images(2)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

i United States Patent [113,599,974

[72] Inventor David D. Price 2,183,265 12/1939 Maloney 272/79 3400 Harvey Parkway, Oklahoma City, 2,300,374 10/ 1942 Turner 254/188 Okla. 73103 2,343,892 2/1944 Dodge et a1 273/DIG. 6 [21] Appl. No. 783,037 3,112,816 12/1963 Halford 254/188 X [221 Filed Dec. 11,1968 3,156,465 11/1964 Jacobi 272/79 [45) Patented Aug. 17, 1971 3,262,697 7/1966 Krinke 271/33 Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham 54 I FRICTION-FYI); EXERCIS'ING DEWCE I Aizvixlrml l'lmruIm-r William R. Browne 11 Claims 7 Drawlng Figs Alturney-Dunlap, Laney & Hessln [52] [1.8. CL... 272/79 R,

3 ABSTRACT: An improved exercising device whereby the per- 1 In. son exercises a rope means extended generally over A63b 21/20 and between upper and lower pulley wheels. The exercising [50] Field 01 Search 272/79, 80, i e-i id d i h an dju table friction brake, whereby 83; 242/156 155, 99;57/113;254/188, the amount of pulling force required to overcome the friction 189273/D1G- 64 271/33 may be varied, as well as guide means, whereby the rope means is retained in contact with the pulley wheels and in the [56] References Cited proper operational path throughout the use of the exercising UNITED STATES PATENTS device. The operations of lifting and pulling may be aided by 1,572,281 2/ 1926 Fry... I 272/79 an adjustable, pivoted hand grip member movably disposed 1,868,262 v 7/1 93 2 taley 272/79 along the rope means for selected affixture.

A FRICTION-TYPE EXERCISING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to improvements in exercising devices and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to an improved exercising device whereby the individual exercises by pulling a rope means.

2. Description of the Prior Art Various exercising devices have been designed in the past employing a rope and pulley arrangement, wherein the general idea was that the person would exercise by pulling the rope against some force. One such device included a rope extended over a single pulley and a series of weights attached to one end of the rope. The individual would simply pull the rope against the opposite force of the weights. The variety'of exercises which could be performed using this device were limited, and the individual was required to keep a multitude of weights of various sizes on hand to change the requirements of the unit. To be operable, this exercising device had to be permanently affixed to a wall or some other solid stationary structure.

One other such device included a rope extended over a single pulley, and a leather braking device, whereby the force required to rotate the pulley was adjustable to some extent. This particular device, although very useful for doing certain exercises, was limited in that the individual could only exercise by pulling in a downward direction on the rope, and the device had to be permanently affixed to a wall or some other solid stationary structure. It is apparent from the foregoing that this device utilized the downward pull of the individual to maintain the necessary frictional contact between the rope and the pulley wheel.

It is apparent that the exercising devices in the past have been limited in their application to a narrow range of specific types of exercises, and generally have not been both mobile and adjustable to meet the exercising needsof a variety of different users.

The problems encountered in designing an exercising device, wherein the individual could exercise by pulling a rope means in either an upward or downward direction, and wherein the pulling force required was adjustable over a wide range, have been many. Some of the problems included; designing the proper combination of guide means to keep the rope means in the proper operational path and yet allow some flexible movement of the rope means in a lateral direction to ac commodate the individual exercising, and to design a proper supporting structure whereby the exercising device was both mobile and structurally sound. Other problems which exist are, of course, obvious from the foregoing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention contemplates un exercising device comprising upper and lower pulley wheels. A continuous rope means is extended around the pulley wheels to define an operational path. An adjustable brake means cooperates with one of the pulley wheels, whereby the force required to rotate the pulley wheel is adjustable. The exercising device employs appropriate guide means, whereby the rope means is retained within the operational path. The guide means includes a guide bracket encircling a portion of the upper pulley wheel and the rope means and a guide eyelet encircling the rope means, disposed with respect to the lower pulley wheel, to guide the rope means into proper engagement with the lower pulley wheel.

One object of the invention is to provide a single exercising device which is adjustable to meet a variety of different exercising requirements.

Another object of the invention is to provide an exercising device which may be effectively used by persons of different ages and different body builds.

A further object of the invention is to provide an exercising device employing a rope means wherein the individual may exercise by either pulling or lifting in an upward or downward direction, in a manner similar to a rope pulling and rope climbing exercise using a handover-hand technique.

One further object of the invention is to provide an exercising device with appropriate and adequate guide means to retain the rope means within the operational path.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an exercising device with an adjustable brake means which requires different forces to pull the rope.

Another object of the invention'is to provide an exercising device which is both structurally sound and yet mobile.

Another object of the invention is to provide an exercising device having a special grip assembly, which may be used for lifting and overhead pressing exercises.

One other object of the invention is to provide an exercising device which is economical in construction and operation.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be evident from the following detailed description. When read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the exercising device.

FIG. 2 is a front elevation of the exercising device taken substantially along lines 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged'partial side elevation of the lower pulley assembly of the exercising device, taken substantially along lines 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged partial front elevation of the lower pulley assembly of the exercising device, taken substantially along lines 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged partial top elevation of the lower pulley assembly of the exercising device, taken substantially along lines 5-5 of'FIG. 4.

'FIG. 6 is an enlarged partial top elevation of the upper pulley assembly of the exercising device taken substantially along lines 6-6 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged partial front elevation of the grip assembly which may be used with the exercising device.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings in detail, and particularly to FIG. 1, reference character 10 generally designates an exercising device constructed in accordance with the invention. The exercising device 10 generally comprises: a base 12; a pair of framework assemblies 14, mounted on the base 12 and secured to each other; an upper pulley assembly 16 mounted between the framework assemblies 14 and disposed generally nearthe top of said framework assemblies 14; a lower pulley assembly 18 mounted on the base 12 and disposed generally between the framework assemblies I4; a continuous rope means 20 extending between the upper and lower pulley assemblies l6 and I8 respectively; and a grip assembly 21 which may be secured about the rope means 20, when the exercising device is used for lifting or overhead press exercising.

The base. 12, having beveled corners 22 and 24 (FIG. 5), is provided to support the exercising device 10. The corners 22 and 24, are beveled on approximately a 45 degree angle to eliminate the safety hazard inherent with sharp corners. The corners 24 are beveled over a longer length than the corners 22 to facilitate the installation or storage of the exercising device 10 in the corner of a room. It is obvious that the mounting of the various components of the exercising device 10 on the base 10 lends a mobility to the exercising device 10. It is also apparent, and will become more apparent hereinafter, that the base 12 could be eliminated and the various components of the exercising device 10 could be permanently installed in a particular location.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the framework assemblies 14 are generally of a triangular shape, having sides 26, 28 and 30 thereon. A plurality of rungs 32 are provided between and connected to the sides 26 and 28, respectively, to provide additional structural support to the framework assemblies 14. The framework assemblies 14 are attached to the base 12 of exercising device by means of bolts 34, shown in FIG. 5, which extend through the sides 30 of framework assemblies 14 and the base 12. The sides 26 and 28, and the rungs 32, may be constructed from a rod or pipe of any appropriate material which will give the desired strength characteristics. One of the reasons for the particular shape and positioning of the framework assemblies 14 with respect to the base 12 and the other components (to be described in detail hereinafter) of the exercising device 10 is to prevent the framework assemblies, and more particularly the side 28 thereof from interfering with the individuals head, arms, and hands during the operation of the exercising device 10, as will be made more apparent hereinafter.

Generally near the top of framework assemblies 14, the sides 26 and 28 thereof are formed on approximately a 90 bend 36 (shown in FIG. 1) and extended'generally parallel to the base 12 of exercising device 10. The sides 26 and 28 terminate at their ends 38 and 40, respectively, and are secured to each other near the said ends 38 and 40.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, the pair of framework assemblies 14 are spaced a distance apart and disposed at an angle with respect to each other. The angular disposition of the framework assemblies 14 is provided to give additional structural support to the framework assemblies 14 and to facilitate the corner mounting or storage, previously mentioned, of the exercising device 10. The exact angle would depend on the particular size of the exercising device 10. As more clearly shown in FIG. 2, the pair of framework assemblies 14 are structurally secured to each other by means of brackets 42.

Although each framework assembly 14 of exercising device 10 is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 to be of a one piece construction, it is obvious that each framework assembly 14 could be constructed in sections to facilitate dismantling for storage or shipment of the exercising device 10.

As clearly shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 6, the upper pulley assembly 16 is disposed relatively between the pair of framework assemblies 14 and is approximately centered with respect to the end points 38 and 40 of sides 26 and 28, respectively. The upper pulley assembly 16 includes an upper pulley wheel 42, having a groove 44 formed around the outer periphery thereof, and a shaft 46 extending therethrough, which is sized and finished to allow free rotation of upper pulley wheel 42 thereabout.

The shaft 46 of upper pulley wheel 42 is extended through, and supported by a shaft support 48 and is secured thereto by means of nuts 50. The shaft support 48 of upper pulley assembly 16 is secured to the sides 26 and 28 of framework assemblies 14, near the respective end points 38 and 40 thereof. A s more clearly shown in FIG. 6, the shaft support 48 includes a guide bracket portion 52 which extends beyond and around the outer periphery of upper pulley wheel 42. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the lower edge of the guide bracket 52, generally. adjacent the rope means is beveled or flared in a generally outwardly direction with respect to the upper pulley wheel 142, to accommodate the rope means 20 during the operation of the exercising device 10, as will be explained in detail hereinafter.

The lower pulley assembly 18, which is mounted on the base 12 of exercising device 10, is disposed generally in alignment with and below the upper pulley assembly 16. As more clearly shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the lower pulley assembly 18 includes a lower pulley wheel 54 which is designed similar to upper pulley wheel 42 of upper pulley assembly 16, having a groove 56 formed around the outer periphery thereof and a shaft 58 which extends therethrough, said shaft 58 being sized and finished to allow free rotation of lower pulley wheel 54 thereabout. In a preferred form, a thin film of frictional material, such as a rubberlike or plastic material is bonded to the surface of groove 56 of lower pulley wheel 54, or in the alternative the entire lower pulley wheel or a portion thereof is constructed of such material for reasons to be made more apparent hereinafter. The diameter of the pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18, as more clearly shown in FIG. 1, is greater than the diameter of pulley wheel 42 of upper pulley assembly 16.

A continuous rope means 20 is extended over and between the upper and lower pulley wheels 42 and 54 of upper and lower pulley assemblies 16 and 18, respectively. More particularly, the rope means 20 is disposed in a portion of the grooves 44 and 56 of upper and lower pulley wheels 42 and 54, respectively. In a preferred form, the rope means 20 is sized to be approximately twice the depth of said grooves 44 and 56 and is constructed of a tube of plastic hoselike material having a relatively flexible characteristic, the purpose for which to be described more fully hereinafter. The exact diameter of the rope means 20 would depend, to some extent, on the size of the particular exercising device being constructed. It is also apparent from FIG. 6 that the rope means 20 is disposed with respect to the guide bracket 52 of upper pulley assembly 16 to be encompassed by said guide bracket 52 for reasons which will become more apparent hereinafter.

As shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18 is disposed relatively between two support structures 60 of a generally rectangular shape, having opposite ends 62 and 64, respectively, and upper and lower sides 66 and 68, respectively. The support structures 60 of lower pulley assembly 18 are firmly secured to the base 12 by means of bolts 70.

Two parallel support members 72, forming a part of each support structure 60, are centrally disposed between opposite ends 62 and 64 and connect the upper and lower sides 66 and 68 of the respective support 60. A shaft support 74 is connected between and supported by the parallel support mem-. bers 72 of each support structure 62. The shaft 58 of lower pulley wheel 54 extends through the shaft supports 74 of lower pulley assembly 18 and is secured thereto by means of nuts 76.

An adjustable brake assembly 78 is disposed relatively between the parallel support members 72 and near the upper side 66 of structure 60. The brake assembly 78 includes a pair of end plates 80, one on each side of pulley 54 The lower portion 82 of each end plate 80 is of a generally hollow cylindrical shape. A shaft 84 is extended through the hollow lower portion 82 of each end plate 80 and through the respective parallel support members 72, thereby affixing the end plates 80 to the structures 60 in a manner which allows the end plates 80 to rotate about the axes of shafts 84 for reasons which will become apparent hereinafter. The shafts 84 of each end plate 80 is secured in position to the respective support members 72 by nuts 86.

A metal brake shoe 88 is secured to the inside portion of each end plate 80 by means of bolts 90, which extend through mating holes in the end plate 80. In one form of the invention and as shown more clearly in FIG. 5, a compression spring 90 surrounds each bolt 90 and is disposed between the end plate 80 and the brake shoe 88. It will become apparent in the discussion hereinafter that the compression spring 91 could be replaced with spacer washers if desired. A brake pad 92, of asbestos or other appropriate material, is bonded to the inside portion of each brake shoe 88. As more clearly shown in FIG. 4, the brake pads 92 of adjustable brake assembly 78 are designed and positioned to brakingly contact the opposite sides of lower pulley wheel 54 of the lower pulley assembly 18. A threaded bolt 94 having a handle 96 in one end thereof, extends through end plates 80 of adjustable brake assembly 78, and threadedly engages one of the end plates 80 opposite the handle end of bolt 94.

It is apparent from FIGS. 4 and 5, that when the handle 96 of adjustable brake assembly 78 is turned, the end plates 80 thereof will rotate about the shaft 84 in a direction 98 or 100 depending upon whether the handle 96 is rotated in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction respectively. When the handle 96 is turned in a clockwise direction, thus rotating the end plate 80 in a direction 98, it is apparent that the frictional contact between the brake pad 92 of brake assembly 78 and the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18 will increase. This increase in frictional contact will, of course, result in a greater amount of centrifugal force being required to rotate lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18. The compression springs 91 will continually bias the brake shoes 88 and brake pads 92 toward the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18, thereby permitting a finer control of the amount of frictional contact obtained by turning the handle 96 of adjustable brake assembly 78.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 5, a guide eyelet 102 is secured to the upper side 66 of structures 60 and generally near the end 62 thereof. The guide eyelet 102 is provided with an aperture 104 and having an inner diameter which is sized to be slightly larger than the outer diameter of rope means 20. As more clearly shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the upper portion of the guide eyelet 102, generally adjacent the aperture 104, is beveled or flared in a generally outwardly direction with respect to the aperture 104, to accommodate the rope means 20, which extends through the aperture 104, during the operation of the exercising device 'as will be described in detail hereinafter. v

A roller support 106, shown more clearly in FIG. 3, is secured to each end 62 and 64 of the support structure 60 and is disposed generally between the upper and lower sides 66 and 68 thereof. A guide roller 108, shown more clearly in FIG. 5, having a shaft 110 extending therethrough is disposed relatively between each pair of roller supports 106 and is secured thereto by means of nuts 11 1. The guide roller 108 is provided with a groove or track 112, which is sized to provide a rolling fit with the outer periphery of rope means 20. As shown more clearly in FIG. 1, the rollers 108 are shown disposed, with respect to the rope means and the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley wheel 54, such that the rollers 108 will bias the rope means 20 toward the lower pulley wheel 54 and generally hold the rope means 20 within the groove 56 of the lower pulley wheel'54, thereby keeping the rope means 20 from slipping therein.

The grip assembly 21, as shown more clearly in FIG. 7, basically comprises a pair of gripping members 120 and a pair of handles 122. One of the pair of handles 122 is secured to each of the gripping members 120 respectively. Each of the gripping members 120 is provided with an upper and'lower portion 124 and 126, respectively, which are connected to each other on one side portion thereof by a connecting portion 128. The inner periphery of each of the upper and lower portions 124 and 126 is sized to matingly fit a portion of the outer periphery of the rope means 20. In a preferred form, each upper and lower portion 124 and 126 is provided to have a generally cylindrical shape to mate with the rope means 20, which in a preferred form is provided to have a generally circular cross section. A plurality of grooves (not shown) are provided encompassing a portion of the inner periphery of the upper and lower portions 124 and 126, adjacent the rope means 20. The grooves are provided to substantially reduce the slippage, which may occur between the grip assembly 21 and the rope means 20. The upper andlower portions 124 and v I 126, respectively are disposed with respect to each other, such that in an assembled position, as clearly shown in FIG. 7 the portions 124 and 126 will engage generally opposite side portions of the rope means 20.

The gripping members 120, and more particularly each connecting member 128 thereof, are pivotally secured to each other by a fastener 130. Therefore in an assembled position, the upper portion 124 of each gripping member 120 is generally disposed on opposite side portions of the rope means 20, with respect to each other, and the lower portion 126 of each gripping member 120 is disposed on opposite side portions of the rope means 20, with respect to each other, for reasons which will be made more apparent hereinafter.

Each handle 122 is shown in FIG. 7 to be secured to the upper portion 124 of each gripping member 120 respectively, and extending generally perpendicular thereto. In a preferred form, each handle 122 should extend from each gripping member 120, a sufficient distance so that when an individual is performing a lifting or overhead pressing exercise, using the exercising device 10, he may grip each handle 122 without interference from his knees, as will be described hereinafter.

A spring 132 is secured on opposite ends thereof to a post 134, which is provided on each lower portion 126 of each gripping member 120. The spring 132 is so disposed and sized to bias each gripping member into engagement with the rope means 20, for reasons to be made more apparent hereinafter.

OPERATION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The exercising device 10, in a preferred form, is designed to be used by a person standing generally in front of the exercising device 10, near end 62 of support structure 60. In one form, to exercise, the individual would grasp the rope means 20 and pull or lift the rope means 20, generally in the upward or downward direction, in a manner similar to a rope climbing or rope lifting exercise using a hand-over-hand technique, depending upon the area of the body one desires to exercise.

It is apparent, that during the operation of the exercising device 10, as described above, the rope means 20 will be continually moving around and between the upper and lower pulley wheels 42 and 54 of upper and lower pulley assemblies 16 and 18, respectively, thereby establishing the general operational path of the rope means 20. The rope means 20 has an overall length, which slightly exceeds the length of the operational path, to provide some flexible movement of the rope means 20 in the generally lateral direction. The rope means, in a preferred form, is constructed from a plastic hoselike material, which is relatively flexible and can be stretched to some extent. It is apparent, that this movement in the lateral direction combined with the flexibility of the rope means 20, permits the person using the exercising device 10, to pull or lift the rope means 20 directly upward without interference from the rope means 20. It is obvious, also, from the foregoing that there will exist pulling forces in direction, other than directly tangent to the upper and lower pulley wheels 42 and 54 of upper and lower pulley assemblies 16 and 18 respectively. It is therefore, important that adequate guide means are employed to retain the rope means 20 in a proper track or operational path.

The rope means 20 of exercising device 10 is retained within the proper operational path by means of guide brackets 52 of upper pulley assembly 16 guide eyelet 102 and guide rollers 108 of lower pulley assembly 18.

The guide bracket 52 (shown in FIG. 6) of upper pulley assembly 16 is provided to retain the rope means 20 within groove 44 of upper pulley wheel 42 in a manner, such that the rope means 20 will not be pulled out of said groove 44 during the operation of the exercising device 10.

The guide eyelet 102 (shown more clearly in FIG. 5) of lower pulley assembly 18 is designed and located to guide the rope means 20 into the groove 56 of lower pulley wheel 54.

The guide rollers 108 (shown more clearly in FIG. 5) of lower pulley assembly 18 are provided and disposed to maintain a constant frictional contact between the rope means 20 and the groove 56 of lower pulley wheel 54. Since the diameter of the rope means is sized to be twice the depth of groove 56 of lower pulley wheel 54, a portion of the rope means 20 will extend beyond the outer periphery of said lower pulley wheel 54, thereby allowing the guide rollers 108 to contact the rope means 20 without interference from the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18. The guide rollers 108 of lower pulley assembly 18 function to retain the rope means 20 in frictional contact with the groove 56 of lower pulley wheel 54 to prevent slippage between the rope means 20 and the lower pulley wheel 54.

The thin film of rubberlike or plastic frictional material, which is bonded to the surfaces of groove 56 ofthe lower pulley wheel 54, results in an increased frictional contact being established between the rope means 20 and said groove 56, thereby eliminating most of the slippage between the rope means 20 and the lower pulley wheel 54 which might occur during the operation of the exercising device 10. The particular type of frictional material used would depend, to some extent, on the type of material used to construct the rope means 20, for example, when the rope means 20 is constructed from a tube of plastic hoselike material, the frictional material would be a plasticlike or rubberlike material. Of course as described hereinbefore, the entire lower pulley wheel 54 or a portion thereof could be constructed of such material, thereby accomplishing the same purpose and yet eliminating the need for bonding such material to the lower pulley wheel 54.

The centrifugal force required to rotate lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18, or in other words the amount of pulling force required to move the rope means 20, may be increased or decreased by turning the handle 96 of adjustable brake assembly 78, in a manner previously described. The lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18 is provided, having a diameter larger than the diameter of upper pulley wheel 42 of upper pulley assembly 16, to accommodate the adjustable brake assembly 78 and to increase the efficiency of said adjustable brake assembly 78 by providing an increased area of frictional contact. The pulling pressure may therefore be adjusted to fit the size, strength, and age requirements of the particular person using the exercising device 10.

it is also apparent from the foregoing that the brake assembly 78 may be adjusted to a position, whereby further rotation of the lower pulley wheel 54 of lower pulley assembly 18 is prevented. In this position of the brake assembly 78, the exercising device 10 may be used effectively by an individual desiring to practice, what is commonly referred to as isometric exercises.

The grip assembly 21 may be used in performing a lifting or pulling exercise, using the exercising device 10; however, it is particularly useful when performing the lifting exercise. The grip assembly 21 is attached to the rope means 20 by forcing each handle 122 in a general direction 136, as shown in FIG. 7. Since the gripping members 120 are pivotally secured to each other, this movement of each handle 122 in a direction 136 will cause the upper and lower portions 124 and 126 of each gripping member 120 to move in the general directions 138, 140, 142, and 144 respectively. It is apparent that this movement of each gripping member 120 will spread the gripping member 120 a distance apart, thereby providing a sufficient gap between them so that the grip assembly 21 may be disposed on a rope means 20. When the force is removed from each handle 122, the spring 132 will bias each gripping member 120 back into engagement with the rope means 20. Of course the grip assembly 21 may be quickly and easily disengaged from the rope means 20, in a manner similar to that described hereinabove.

exercise, the individual would grasp each handle 122 simultaneously and lift or pull on said handle 122, thereby lifting or pulling the rope means 20. In particular, when performing the lifting exercise, the individual would grasp each handle 122, and lift in a generally upward direction. Since each handle is extended a distance in a generally perpendicular direction from the rope means 20 the individual's arms and hands, when performing the overhead press and the lifting exercises, will generally extend about the outer side portion of his respective knee and leg, thereby reducing the back strain encountered during this type ofexercise.

As previously described a portion of the guide brackets 52 and the guide eyelet 102 is beveled or flared to reduce the possibility of the rope means 20 hanging, or catching on the guide eyelet 102, or the guide brackets 52, during the operation of the exercising device 10.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that the exercising device provides a versatile unit, whereby one may perform a variety of different exercises by simply making minor adjustments in the exercising device 10. The adjustable braking feature of the exercising device 10, combined with the continuous rope means 20, permits the exercising device 10 to be used to the maximum advantage by persons having different heights, weights, ages and exercising requirements.

Changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of parts or elements of the various embodiments as disclosed herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

Whatl claim is:

1. An exercising device comprising:

upper and lower pulley wheels;

framework means comprising upright members receiving said upper and lower pulley wheels in rotational affixture to support said pulley wheels in spaced-apart disposition, said framework means further comprising a platform supporting said upright members;

a continuous rope means extending around the pulley wheels to define an operational path;

an adjustable brake means cooperating with one of the pulley wheels, whereby the force required to rotate the said one of the pulley wheels is adjustable by varying the gripping force on the said one of the wheels; and

a guide means whereby the rope means is retained within the operational path, comprising;

a guide bracket encircling a portion of the upper pulley wheel and the rope means;

a tubular-shaped guide eyelet encircling the rope means and disposed with respect to the lower pulley wheel to guide the rope means into proper engagement with the lower pulley wheel; and,

said adjustable brake means comprising a spring biased friction developing means disposed adjacent and off center of the said one of the pulley wheels in biased disposition to said one of the pulley wheels to retard relative movement between said one of the pulley wheels and said rope means.

2. The exercising device of claim 1, wherein the lower pulley wheel includes a groove around the outer periphery thereof, said rope means being disposed generally in a portion of said groove.

3. The exercising device of claim 2, wherein the rope means has a generally circular cross section having a cross-sectional diameter sized to be approximately twice the depth of said groove, whereby a portion of said rope means will extend beyond the outer periphery of the lower pulley wheel, when in engagement therewith.

4. The exercising device of claim 2, wherein the groove around the lower pulley wheel is defined further to include a frictional material bonded to the surface of said groove, thereby increasing the frictional contact between the rope means and the lower pulley wheel.

5. The exercising device of claim 2 wherein the guide means includes a shaft mounted near the lower pulley wheel having a guide roller journaled thereon, said guide roller is of a generally cylindrical shape having a grooved portion, sized to rollingly engage the rope means, extending around the circumference of said rope means and generally between the ends of said guide roller, said guide roller positioned to increase the frictional contact between the rope means and the lower pulley wheel and generally to retain said rope means firmly within said groove to keep the rope means from slipping.

6. The exercising device of claim 1 wherein the rope means is constructed of flexible hose material.

7. The exercising device of claim 1, wherein the adjustable brake means cooperates with the lower pulley wheel to vary the force required to rotate said lower pulley wheel,

8. The exercising device of claim 7, wherein the adjustable brake means includes,

an end plate disposed on each side of the lower pulley wheel;

a brake shoe means disposed on each side of the lower pulley wheel;

a brake pad means secured to each of said brake shoe means, disposed to frictionally engage opposite sides of the lower pulley wheel respectively;

a plurality of bolts connecting each of said brake shoe means to the respective end plate;

spacer means disposed about each bolt and each spacer means positioned, between each of said end plates and the respective brake shoe means; and

a threaded bolt means connecting said end plates, whereby the distance between each of said brake shoe means may be varied, thereby varying the engaging force between each of the brake pad means and the lower pulley wheel.

9. The adjustable brake means of claim 8, wherein the spacer means is a spring.

10. The exercising device of claim 9 wherein the grip means includes, a pair of gripping members pivotally secured to each other, said handle means comprising two handles, each handle being secured to a separate gripping member; and including a spring disposed generally between each gripping member and attached on opposite ends to each respective gripping member, thereby biasing the gripping members generally into engagement with said rope means.

11. The exercising device of claim 1 characterized further to include a grip means removably attached to the rope means, having a pair of handle means attached to and extending generally perpendicular from said grip means.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4482152 *Oct 13, 1982Nov 13, 1984Wolff Leslie CExercise equipment
US4512570 *Feb 17, 1983Apr 23, 1985Monique M. TardivelRope climbing exercise apparatus
US4826154 *Jul 12, 1988May 2, 1989Askonen Arto AExercise device
US5060938 *Nov 5, 1990Oct 29, 1991Hawley Jr Peter JRope climbing exercise apparatus
US5076574 *Aug 13, 1990Dec 31, 1991Johnson Jr RaymondRope climbing exercise apparatus
US5154684 *May 4, 1990Oct 13, 1992Delf Eric WExercise apparatus for the human body
US5318493 *Jul 24, 1991Jun 7, 1994Brady Dennis LExercise apparatus
US5354248 *Mar 19, 1993Oct 11, 1994Stairmaster Sports/Medical Products, Inc.Exercise apparatus
US5380258 *Oct 26, 1992Jan 10, 1995Stairmaster Sports/Medical Products, Inc.Exercise apparatus
US5496234 *Apr 6, 1993Mar 5, 1996Creswin Pty. Ltd.Endless rope exercise device
US5565002 *Mar 18, 1994Oct 15, 1996Stairmaster Sports/Medical Products, L.P.Exercise apparatus
US6261208 *May 13, 1999Jul 17, 2001Murdock Carson, Jr.Rope pulling frictional exercise device
US6808474 *Jul 22, 2003Oct 26, 2004Jack TangLaptop rope pulling exerciser
US7018323Apr 24, 2003Mar 28, 2006Lynn ReynoldsRope climbing apparatus
US7387593Jan 7, 2004Jun 17, 2008John RyanPortable simulated pulling apparatus
US7811204 *May 23, 2006Oct 12, 2010Marius PopescuAssisted rope climbing apparatus
US8025608 *Aug 13, 2008Sep 27, 2011Marius PopescuContinuous rope pulling exercise apparatus
WO1993022003A1 *Apr 6, 1993Nov 11, 1993Creswin Pty LtdAn endless rope exercise device
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/118, 242/156
International ClassificationA63B21/012, A63B21/015
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/015, A63B7/045
European ClassificationA63B21/015