Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3601031 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1971
Filing dateSep 22, 1969
Priority dateSep 22, 1969
Publication numberUS 3601031 A, US 3601031A, US-A-3601031, US3601031 A, US3601031A
InventorsKenneth Abel, Arnold W Blomquist, Richard K Olson, Keith A Ufford
Original AssigneeLitton Systems Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Patient isolator room
US 3601031 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Appl. No.

Kenneth Abel New Brighton;

Arnold W. Bloinqukt, St. Paul; Richard K. Olson, Minneapolis; Keith A. Ufl'ord, Minneapolis, all of, Minn.

Sept. 22, 1969 Aug. 24, 197 1 Litton Systems, Inc.

Beverly Hills, Calif.

Inventors Filed Patented Assignee PATIENT ISOLATOR ROOM 1 Claim, 2 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 98/33,

128/371, 62/261 Int. Cl F241 13/00 Field of Search 98/33, 33

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,002,234 5/1935 Morrison 62/261 2,104,589 1/1938 Hartman 62/261 2,162,523 6/1939 Blood 98/33 R 2,502,263 3/1950 Lewis 62/261 Primary Examiner-William .l. Wye Attorney-Wayne B. Easton ABSTRACT: The invention relates to a patient isolator room which is designed and adapted to be assembled within the confines of an ordinary hospital room. The isolator room is equipped with an airflow and filtering system which functions to isolate a patient from micro-organisms present in a hospital environment and, vice versa, to isolate a patient having an infectious disease.

PATIENT ISOLATOR ROOM This invention relates to a patient isolator room which is designed and adapted to be assembled within the confines of a normal or ordinary hospital room. The isolator room provides a relatively germ-free environment for long term confinement of patients who require such an environment in certain instances such as for patients requiring through an environment in certain instances such as for patients cancer chemotherapy treatments, recovering from transplant operations, having severe burns, are asthmatics or are in shock.

The patient isolator room is equipped with an air flow and filtering system which functions to isolate a patient from micro-organisms present in a hospital environment and, vice versa, to isolate a patient having an infectious disease.

A main object of the invention is to provide a new and improved patient isolator room having an air flow and filtering system which creates a germ-free environment and effectively isolates the patient from the hospital environment outside the isolator room. A further object is to provide such a room which may be readily assembled within the confines of an ordinary hospital room.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following specification, drawings and appended claims. In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a portable patient isolator room constructed in accordance with the invention; and

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the patient isolator room shown in FIG. 1. I

The environment for a portable patient isolator room constructed in accordance with the invention would normally be a conventional type of hospital room with the isolator room being assembled inside the hospital room. The isolator room can normally be assembled and installed in approximately one day. Renovation of the hospital room is held to a minimum since the isolator room itself contains all needed patient support equipment except power and water which is furnished by the hospital.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, a conventional hospital room is represented by four walls 11 to 14 with walls 11 and 13 being common walls of adjacent rooms, wall 12 being an outside wall with windows and wall 14 being an inside wall with a door 15 leading to a hallway.

The patient isolator room is assembled within the confines of a hospital room and may have various forms within the scope of the invention. The isolator room illustrated has four walls, or forms of walls. One of the walls may have the form of or be a filtering module which normally would have a height of about 7 feet and have a generally rectangular shape. Throughout this description the filtering module will be referred to interchangeably and indiscriminately as a filtering module or as a wall.

A frame structure 22 may be provided for supporting or forming the other walls and the ceiling but other types of erected structures may also be used. As illustrated, an end wall 24, the wall 26 opposite the filtering module 20, and the ceiling 28 have clear glass panels or panels made of a clear plastic material. These panels could also be opaque if desired but it is more convenient to disclose them as being transparent for purposes of illustration.

The wall" 30 opposite wall 22 is illustrated as having the form of a curtain which may be drawn aside to permit entry into the isolator room.

A room divider 32 extends from the filtering module 20, from a point between the ends thereof, part way into the isolator room and terminates short of the wall 26. The divider extends from the floor to the ceiling so that there can be no air flow over the top of the divider. The exact placement of the room divider 32 is optional to some extent but in one satisfactory arrangement the spacing of the divider from the left end of wall 20 is about one-fourth the length of that wall. The

length of the divider 32 may be about three-fourths the width of the isolator room from wall 20 to the wall 26. The room divider 32 must of course be between or at the junction of the air inlet and outlets 38 and 40 in any arrangement selected.

The primary function of the room divider 32 involves and relates to the flow of air in the isolator room but, as illustrated, its presence permits it to also be used secondarily as a conventional room divider to house a sink, have the attributes of a desk, contain cabinets and have shelving at the top thereof.

The divider 32 divides the isolator room into a patients area 34 which contains a bed and other hospital room facilities and an air return corridor 36. The filtering module or wall 20 has an air inlet section 38 on one side of the divider 32, at the end of the corridor 36, and an air outlet section 40 on the other side of the divider. The air inlet and outlet sections extend from the floor to the ceiling and occupy the entire wall surface of the wall 20 except for area where the divider 32 joins the wall 20. I

The air inlet and outlet sections are provided respectively with grilles 42 and 44 which are designed to accommodate and facilitate the horizontal uniform flow of air into and out of these sections. Behind grille 42 is a motorized blower 46 for drawing air through grille 42 and blowing it out through grille 44. Between grille 42 and the blower is a low-efficiency filter 48 which is referred to as a prefilter.

Behind grille 44 is a special type of filter 50 known as a HEPA filter which means high efficiency particulate arrestor. This type of filter is typically made of microglass fibers and organic binders. It is manufactured as a sealed unit to prevent leaks and the channeling of nonfiltered air. This type of filter must be replaced periodically but under conditions of hospital cleanliness may have an operational life of five years or more.

The purpose of the patient isolator room, as mentioned in the introduction, is to provide a germ-free environment for the patient. In operation the blower is preferably selected or adjusted so that the air emanating through the HEPA filter 50 and grille 44 into the patients area 34 has a speed of from 30 to feet per minute. Although air movement at these velocities is almost imperceptible to the patient, a cubic foot of space in the area 34 gets a change of air about 100 times per minute at the higher air flow rates. The HEPA filter functions tohorizontally direct a uniform flow of air into area 34 and, as there is thus an absence of eddy currents, micro-organisms on articles in the room are constantly being swept directly and uniformly away from the patient. Air so swept away from the patient is drawn by the blower 46 around the end of divider 32 through the corridor 36 and into the air intake section 38. If the corridor 36 is one-third the width of the patients area 34, as an approximation, the air velocity through the corridor will be several times faster, such as 300 feet per minute, for example. This added speed for the air flow in the corridor 36 has the advantage that nurses and doctors entering the room through the curtain 30 will be washed by higher speed air so that micro-organisms clinging to their clothing will be swept away by a higher velocity air than to which the patient is ex posed. This means that medical personnel may enter and leave the isolator room with minimal special preparation.

It is not practical, feasible or desirable to seal the isolator room so as to be airtight. The flow of air past the patient and through the corridor 36 picks up air seeping into the room, however, and immediately draws it through the filtering system and cleans it.

We claim:

1. A portable patient isolator room adapted to be assembled within the confines of a hospital room comprising, vertical wall means, roof means attached to said wall means, said wall means including one wall having an air inlet section and an air outlet section, said inlet and outlet sections being horizontally adjacent each other, air-conveying means for drawing air into said inlet section and expelling air out of said outlet section, a wall divider extending partially into said isolator room from said wall from a point between said inlet and outlet sections,

means for filtering and horizontally directing a uniform flow of air expelled from said outlet section, said wall divider dividing said room into a bed area and a corridor through which air flows to said air inlet section, said corridor being of lesser

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2002234 *Mar 5, 1934May 21, 1935Morrison Willard LAir cooling and circulating device and process
US2104589 *Feb 23, 1934Jan 4, 1938Frank W HartmanRefrigerating apparatus
US2162523 *Oct 10, 1934Jun 13, 1939Borg WarnerAir conditioning apparatus
US2502263 *Mar 9, 1948Mar 28, 1950Lewis Clifford AAir sterilizing and dehydrating apparatus for oxygen tents
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3721067 *Sep 1, 1971Mar 20, 1973B AgnewClean air system for hospital operating rooms
US3766844 *Dec 21, 1971Oct 23, 1973Us ArmyProtective system for contaminated atmosphere
US3777736 *Mar 16, 1971Dec 11, 1973TnoTransporter for substantially germfree transport of big living organisms
US3782265 *May 5, 1971Jan 1, 1974Pielkenrood Vinitex BvAssembly for separating a dust-free part from a space, and method for disinfecting the same
US4304224 *Mar 28, 1980Dec 8, 1981Roger FortneyPositive environmental enclosure
US4604111 *May 20, 1985Aug 5, 1986Anthony NataleParticulate contamination control method and filtration device
US4608066 *Jul 31, 1985Aug 26, 1986Flanders Filters, Inc.Clean room adapted for variable work area configurations
US4676144 *Dec 30, 1985Jun 30, 1987Smithkline Beckman CorporationClean room system
US4731961 *Nov 14, 1986Mar 22, 1988Bona Richard RTemporary isolation structure
US4856242 *Dec 18, 1987Aug 15, 1989Steelcase Inc.Space partition arrangement
US5074894 *Feb 1, 1991Dec 24, 1991Component Systems, Inc.Apparatus for isolating contagious respiratory hospital patients
US5152814 *Dec 20, 1991Oct 6, 1992Component Systems, Inc.Apparatus for isolating contagious respiratory hospital patients
US5472466 *May 4, 1994Dec 5, 1995Oler; James H.Smoker's module
US5533305 *Aug 30, 1994Jul 9, 1996Mark Solutions, Inc.Treatment booth for infectious patients
US5761908 *Jun 10, 1994Jun 9, 1998Air Quality EngineeringFor a room within a building
US6405491Apr 22, 1999Jun 18, 2002Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Modular patient room
US6869458 *May 5, 2003Mar 22, 2005Sanki Engineering Co., Ltd.Bioclean room unit
US6966937 *Jun 13, 2003Nov 22, 2005Sanki Engineering Co., Ltd.Patient isolation unit
US7174678Feb 8, 2002Feb 13, 2007Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Modular patient room
US7181786 *Jul 4, 2002Feb 27, 2007Guenther SchoettleBed compromising an air guiding unit for air-conditioning rooms
US7323025 *Jul 7, 2004Jan 29, 2008Beth-El Zikhron-Ya' Aqov Industries, LtdSystem and method for protection/isolation against infections
US7335243 *Apr 22, 2003Feb 26, 2008Jane HomanModular biosafety containment apparatus and system
US7380296Aug 3, 2004Jun 3, 2008Vival Medical CorporationRestraining enclosure for a bed and related method
US7479103Aug 2, 2005Jan 20, 2009Vivax Medical CorporationPortable isolation enclosure
US7537030Feb 7, 2007May 26, 2009Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Patient point-of-care water sterilizer
US7934981Aug 15, 2006May 3, 2011William David MuggahPatient isolation module and use thereof
US8215065May 19, 2009Jul 10, 2012Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Modular wall unit
US8458962Jul 5, 2012Jun 11, 2013Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Wall unit having concealable service outlets
US20100003912 *Jul 7, 2009Jan 7, 2010Industrial Technology Research InstituteMedical mini-environment device
WO1988003595A1 *Nov 13, 1987May 19, 1988Richard R BonaTemporary isolation structure
WO2003100324A2 *May 23, 2003Dec 4, 2003Charles W SpenglerA clean room with a blower including a hepa filter and ducts
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/187, 600/21, D25/33, 96/223, 607/81, D25/1, 55/DIG.290, 55/467, 62/261, 454/251, D25/35, D25/58, 55/385.2
International ClassificationF24F3/16, A61G10/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/161, A61G10/005, Y10S55/29
European ClassificationA61G10/00B, F24F3/16B5
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 12, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: CARMCO, LTD., AKA SCI-MED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, I
Owner name: SMES, INC.
Effective date: 19850122
Feb 12, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: CARMCO, LTD., AKA SCI-MED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, I
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SMES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004363/0248
Effective date: 19850122
Feb 11, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: SCI-MED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, INC., 7005 WASHINGT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FOTO MARK, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004360/0069
Effective date: 19850122
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FOTO MARK, INC;REEL/FRAME:004360/0088
Effective date: 19850103
Feb 11, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: FOTO MARK, INC
Owner name: SCI-MED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, INC., 7005 WASHINGT
Effective date: 19850103