Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3601371 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1971
Filing dateNov 19, 1968
Priority dateNov 19, 1968
Publication numberUS 3601371 A, US 3601371A, US-A-3601371, US3601371 A, US3601371A
InventorsRoss Abe D
Original AssigneeRoss Abe D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixer dispenser
US 3601371 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Abe D. Ros 173,401 2/1876 Ford 259/107 101 Marine Avenue, Wilmington, Calif. 431,3 2 7/ 39 d n /8 90744 634,999 10/1899 Schaaf 259/8 X [21] Appl. No. 777,064 2,448,042 8/1948 Miller 259/7 [22} Filed Nov. 19, 1968 3,415,494 12/1968 Fisher et a1. 259/8 Patented Aug. 24,1971 3,482,822 12/1969 Krizak etal 259/8 FOREIGN PATENTS 556,349 9/1943 Great Britain 259/8 [54] 365,651 12/1962 Switzerland 259/8 Primary Examiner-James Kee Chi 52 l l 1 Us C 259,8 5 5 Attorney-Robert K. Youtie [51] 1nt.Cl B01! 7/16 Field of Search 259/58,

12-15, 107, 108 ABSTRACT: A hub is eccentrically rotatable within a casing and carries generally chordally disposed blades rotatable with [56] Rdereucs Cm the hub and slidable relative thereto, the blades having UNITED STATES PATENTS oblique surfaces for displacing material being mixed axially of 74,467 2/ 1868 Williams 259/108 the hub while effecting mixture of the material.

l .l-zg

PATENTEfi um um INVENTOR it: a Foss BY flwfizwn ATTORN Y MIXER DISPENSER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION While the device of the present invention has been primarily developed for employment in the mixture of plastics, and

specifically for mixing plastic foams, it is well suited for a variety of mixing and dispensing applications all of which are intended to be comprehended herein. In the past, the mixing and dispensing of plastic foams and other mixtures required apparatus of relatively high cost, which was inconvenient and difficult to use, often requiring considerable periods of time to achieve the desired uniformity of mixture, and sometimes being incapable of the desired performance.

SUMMARY Accordingly, it is an important object of the present invention to provide a mixer dispenser of the type described which overcomes the above-mentioned difficulties, is extremely simple in construction, capable of being small, compact and light in weight, as for convenient portability in use, and which effects a highly uniform mixture in a relativelyshort period of time, for economical, high speed production of consistent high quality.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a mixer dispenser having the advantageous characteristics mentioned in the preceding paragraph, which is extremely simple in construction, durable and reliable in operation throughout a long useful life, and which can be economically manufactured for sale at a reasonable price.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings, which form a material part of this disclosure.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described, and of which the scope will be indicated by the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a top plan view or an end view showing a mixer dispenser constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top or end view of the mixer dispenser of FIG. 1 with the upper end thereof removed.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken generally along the line 4-4 ofFIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a partialsectional view taken generally along the line 5-5 ofFIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now more particularly to the drawings, a mixer dispenser is there generally designated 10, and includes an elongate generally tubular or hollow casing 11 which may be of a cylindrical, but outwardly tapering configuration as seen in FIG. 3. That is, the casing 11 includes a generally tubular sidewall 12, and has one end closed, say its smaller or lower end as seen in FIG. 3, by an end wall 13. The larger or upper end of the casing 11 may include a generally circular, substantially flat wall 14 having a depending circumferential channel 15 removably receiving the upper end region of the casing side wall 12. In this manner, the casing 11 may have its opposite ends closed, the upper or inlet end 14 being provided with lower interior region of the casing 11 and the exterior thereof for dispensing materials to a desired location.

' The casing 11 may be formed of any suitable material, and may be provided exteriorly with a handgrip or handle 20, if desired. In addition, the casing end wall 14 may be formed with a central through opening 21, while the casing end wall 13 may be formed with a central bearing recess or socket 22, both for a purpose appearing presently.

Extending coaxially throughthe casing 11 may be a shaft 25, having one end region 26 rotatably received and journaled in the casing end wall recess 22. The shaft extends from its journaled support in the casing end wall 13 entirely through the casing 1 l and rotatably through the opening 21 of end wall 14, from which it projects exteriorly of the casing, as at 27, say for connection to a rotary driver 28, which may be a portable electric drill, or other suitable drive means.

Interiorly of the casing 11, extending longitudinally therewithin, is an elongate, generally cylindrical body or hub 30 fixedly carried by the shaft 25 eccentrically thereof. That is, the elongate, generally cylindrical hub 30 extends longitudinally along and eccentrically of the shaft 25, the latter extending longitudinally through and beyond opposite ends of the hub, being suitably fixed or keyed thereto by any desired means. As best seen in FIG. 3, the eccentric hub 30 extends from a lower end 31 proximate to the casing end 13, to an upper end 32 proximate to the upper casing end 14. Upon rotation of the shaft 25 relative to the casing 11, the hub 30 rotates eccentrically about the rotary axis of the shaft.

The hub 30 is formed, at a plurality of locations throughout its length, with a series of diametrically extending through holes 33 arranged in angularly spaced relation with respect to each other. Thus, each of the holes 33 extend diametrically through the hub 30, opening at opposite ends from the hub, with adjacent holes being spaced longitudinally along the hub axis and angularly offset with respect to each other. In addition, each of the holes 33may be of a noncircular or triangular cross-sectional configuration so as to conformably and slidably receive an elongate member or blade 34 extending through and beyond the respective hole. That is, each of the blades 34 is of a noncircular or triangular configuration, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, which may be constant throughout its length. The elongate members or blades 34 each extends slidably through its respective hub hole 33 and project therebeyond to terminate at opposite ends proximate to the inner surface of casing sidewall 12, see FIGS. 2 and 4. ltwill there be observed that the blades 34 extending diametrically through and beyond the hub 30 are disposed chordally of and within the tubular casing 11 at longitudinally spaced locations therealong. As best seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, the triangular hub holes 33 are disposed with one surface generally normal to the axis of rotation of shaft 25 and proximate to the casing end 14, while the remaining triangular internal surfaces extend obliquely together toward the other casing end 13. Conformably, the blades 34 of triangular cross section each include one surface 35 disposed generally normal to the axis of rotation of shaft 25, anda pair of convergent surfaces 36 each facing obliquely toward the casing end 13.

Disposed adjacent to respective ends 31 and '32 of the hub 30, concentrically with respect to the shaft 25 and suitably fixed relative thereto, are generally circular augers or spiral discs 38 and 39. That is, the anger or disc 38 is carried with the shaft 25 at the lower end of hub 30, see FIG. 3, and is of a spirulconfiguration to impel fluent material downward. The upper auger or disc 39 iscarried at the upper end of hub 30 for rotation with the shaft 25 and also configured to impel fluent material downward.

Upon rotation of the shaft 25, as by the driving means 28, the hub 30 rotates interiorly of the casing 11 about the axis of the shaft and carries the blades 34 about the shaft axis. That is, the hub 30 rotates eccentrically and carries the blades 34 eccentrically about the shaft axis. Further, by virtue of relative movement of the hub 30 within the casing sidewall 12, and the length of the blades 34 approximating the chordal distances of the casing sidewall, the blades are caused to slide in their respective holes or openings 33 relative to the hub during their eccentric rotation with the hub about the shaft axis.

The components to be mixed are separately introduced into the casing 11 through inlet means 16 and 17 and fed therefrom downwardly by the upper end auger 39 where they are thoroughly mixed by the agitating effect of eccentrically rotating hub 30 as well as the rotative action of the blades 34 and their relative sliding movement with respect to the hub and each other. Moreover, by the obliquely downwardly facing surfaces 36 of the blades or vanes 34 the materials or components introduced are propelled downwardly during the mixing. Additional intimacy of mixing may be obtained by the decreasing annular cross-sectional space between the hub 30 and casing sidewall 12 in the direction toward the outlet 18. However, the space between hub 30 and easing wall 12 may be of constant cross section, if desired, or of increasing cross section to accommodate expanding material, toward the outlet 18. Upon movement of the mixed components to the lower end of the hub 30, the lower end auger 38 effectively displaces the mixture forwardly and outwardly, downwardly as seen in the drawing, through the outlet 18.

From the foregoing, it is seen that a mixing dispenser is provideci which full accomplishes its intended objects and is well adapted to meet practical conditions of manufacture and use.

Although the present invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A mixer dispenser comprising a generally tubular casing having opposite ends closed, inlet means communicating with the interior of said casing adjacent to one end thereof for the ingress of components to be mixed, outlet means communicating with the interior of said casing adjacent to the other end thereof for the egress of the mixture of said components, a rotary shaft extending axially within said casing and projecting externally through one casing end, an eccentric hub on said shaft for rotation therewith axially of and in spaced relation within said casing, and a plurality of substantially straight blades each extending freely slidably through said hub chordally within said casing for rotation with said hub and sliding relative thereto upon scraping opposite end engagement of said blades with said casing to effect mixing of said mixture, said blades having oblique surfaces for feeding said mixture toward said outlet means.

2. A mixer dispenser according to claim 1, said blades each being generally triangular in cross section having one side in a plane generally normal to the axis of rotation and facing toward said one casing end, the other sides being oblique to the axis of rotation and facing obliquely toward said other casing end to define said oblique surfaces.

3. A mixer dispenser according to claim 1, said hub extending substantially between the casing ends, and auger means at opposite ends of said hub to aid said ingress and egress.

4. A mixer dispenser according to claim 1, said hub and the interior of said casing being configured to provide a space therebetween of decreasing cross section in the direction toward said outlet means.

5. A mixer dispenser according to claim 1, said hub being generally cylindrical, and said casing tapering toward said outlet means, whereby the space between said casing and hub is of decreasing cross section toward said outlet means and said blades extend generally diametrically through and beyond said hub for said scraping engagement.

6. A mixer dispenser according to claim 1, in combination with a pair of helical augers carried concentrically by said shaft adjacent to opposite casing ends for aiding said ingress and egress.

7. A mixer dispenser according to claim 6, said hub extending between and terminating at its opposite ends at said pair of augers.

8. A mixer dispenser according to claim 7, said blades each being generally triangular in cross section and having one side in a planegenerally normal to the axis of rotation and facing toward sai one casing end, the other sides being oblique to the axis of rotation and facing obliquely toward said other casing end to define said oblique surfaces.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US74467 *Feb 11, 1868 williams
US173401 *Jul 10, 1875Feb 15, 1876 Improvement in machines for mixing plaster
US431372 *Apr 30, 1888Jul 1, 1890 Mash-tub
US634999 *Nov 18, 1898Oct 17, 1899Heinrich SchaafProcess of introducing volatile substances into soap.
US2448042 *Sep 14, 1943Aug 31, 1948Girdler CorpMixing apparatus
US3415494 *Jul 13, 1966Dec 10, 1968Sprout Waldron & Co IncLiquid addition mixer
US3482822 *Jan 30, 1968Dec 9, 1969Krizak Eugene JMixing device
CH365651A * Title not available
GB556349A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4178105 *May 30, 1978Dec 11, 1979Sollich Kg SpezialmaschinenfabrikApparatus for controlling the temperature of flowable chocolate materials
US4669966 *Jul 15, 1985Jun 2, 1987Norvidan Engineering Nederland B.V.Pelletizing apparatus with mixing blades for compacting powdered and fibrous raw materials to a pellet product
US5607235 *Mar 3, 1995Mar 4, 1997Campbell; Craig C.High speed combined mixing and transport tool
US5692831 *Nov 22, 1996Dec 2, 1997Campbell; Craig C.High speed combined mixing and transport tool
US7222725 *Jun 12, 2006May 29, 2007Somarakis Environmental Systems, LlcPin conveyor for pasty materials such as animal waste
US20050050580 *Dec 12, 2001Mar 3, 2005Masashi GotohTransgenic animal expressing hla-a24 and utilization thereof
WO2007146528A2 *May 14, 2007Dec 21, 2007Somarakis Environmental Systems, LlcPin conveyor for pasty materials such as animal waste
WO2007146528A3 *May 14, 2007Aug 21, 2008Somarakis Environmental SystemPin conveyor for pasty materials such as animal waste
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/325.2, 366/312, 366/347
International ClassificationB01F7/00, B01F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01F7/0005
European ClassificationB01F7/00B10C