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Publication numberUS3601404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1971
Filing dateMay 26, 1970
Priority dateMay 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3601404 A, US 3601404A, US-A-3601404, US3601404 A, US3601404A
InventorsJoseph A Weisbecker
Original AssigneeJoseph A Weisbecker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination game and puzzle board apparatus
US 3601404 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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[72] Inventor Joseph A.Weisbec1ier 2,536,380 1/1951 Lucassen 273/131 B 1120 Wayne Ave, Erlton, Cherry Hill, NJ. 2,982,551 5/1961 Garnett 273/131 BA 0801M 3,130,972 4/1964 Schwarzlander 273/131 AB 1970 Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe An -R b 1K. Y t'e 45 1 Patented Aug. 241, 1971 er 54 COMBIINATHON GAME AND PUZZLE BOARD APPARATUS ABSTRACT: A combination game and puzzle wherein a plug qjmimsfl Drawing mgg rality of subsurface elongate passageways are provided beneath the playing surface of a board, and rows of apertures {52] US. Q1 ..Z 3/l 1 B, am f d through the playing Surface into either 273/131 8,273/131 D, 273/136 E, 273/155, passageways, so that elongate playing pieces are insertable 273/137 273/137 D into the passageways for exposure through the apertures of [51] inLCl A63f 3/02 characteristically marked different Segments of the piaying [50] Field of Search 273/131, pieces, said apertures and the interapenure spaces are of the 1321 155 same dimension longitudinally of the rows, and said segments are of the same dimension as said apertures and spaces lon- [56] References cited gitudinally of the rows, whereby adjacent segments may be ex- UNITED STATES PATENTS posed and concealed, respectively, by an aperture and an adl,703,159 2/1929 Monheim 273/155 jacent space.

COMBINATION GAME AND PUZZLE BOARD APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the fields of games and puzzles, the desiderata are versatility in use without loss of inherent attraction andeducational value. Versatility includes use by different numbers of players or users, capability of being employed in the play of many different games and puzzles, and inherent attraction to many widely different age groups.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an important object of the present invention to provide an educational-entertainment device which is extremely versatile in use, being capable of use as a game by two, three or four players, and as a puzzle by individuals, being highly attractive to persons of all ages, and capable of employment in many varied puzzles and games, so as to find absorbing utilization for continuous hours.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a game-puzzle device which serves to develop the users ability to plan ahead, and to enhance the users memory capacity, all while being highly entertaining to the user.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an educational-entertainment device having the advantageous characteristics mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, which is extremely simple instructure, capable of economic mass production for sale at a reasonable price, and adapted for trouble-free employment throughout a long useful life.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings, which form a material part of this disclosure. 2

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described, and of which the scope will be indicated by the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top perspective view showing a device of the present invention, partially exploded to illustrate interior construction.

FIG. 2 is a top perspective view showing the device of FIG. I in its assembled condition.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view illustrating a plurality of playing pieces for use in the instant invention.

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic plan view showing the playing board of the present invention just prior to the start of play.

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic plan view similar to FIG. 4, but illustrating a slightly later stage in use of the device.

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic plan view similar to FIGS. 4 and 5, but illustrating still a later stage in use of the device.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic plan view showing another type of utilization of the device.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and specifically to FIG. 2 thereof, a game-puzzle device of the present invention is there generally designated 10, and includes a board 11, which may be generally flat, and of substantially rectangular outline configuration.

As best seen in FIG. 1, the board 11 may be composed of a substantially flat, generally rectangular lower layer or sheet 12, and a plurality of elongate barlike spacer members or strips 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18. The spacer strips 13-18 may all be of substantially identical, generally rectangular crosssectional configuration, constant throughout their length, and arranged in generally parallel, side by side, spaced relation on the upper surface of lower sheet 12. As best seen in FIG. 1, the substantially identical spacer members or strips 13-18 are each coextensive in length with the lower sheet 12, equally laterally spaced on the lower sheet, and suitably fixed thereto, as by adhesive or other suitable fastening means. The outermost spacer strips 13 and 18 may have their outer side edges substantially flush with the adjacent side edges of the lower sheet 12, while the remaining spacer members or strips 14-17 are located in equally spaced relation intermediate the outer strips. It will therefore be appreciated that the spacer strips 13-18 combine with the lower sheet 12 to define in the spaces between adjacent pairs of strips a plurality of open ended, parallel spaced grooves or passageways, as at 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24. That is, the passageways 20-24 are each of equal length, being coextensive and having their opposite ends open, the passageway 20 being located between the spacer strips 13 and 14, the passageway 21 being located between the spacer strips 14 and 15, the passageway 22 being located between the spacer strips 15 and 16, the passageway 23 being located between the spacer strips 16 and 17, and the passageway 24 being located between the spacer strips 17 and 18.

In addition, the board 11 includes a generally rectangular, substantially flat upper layer, member or sheet 26 resting conformably on the upper surfaces of the spacer strips 13-18. That is, the upper sheet 26 is of a generally rectangular outline configuration, substantially conforming to that of the lower sheet 12, and arranged in spacedly superposed generally congruent relation with respect to the latter. Suitable securing means may be employed to fix the upper sheet 26 in position on the spacer bars or strips 13-18. It will now be appreciated that the passageways 20-24 may be considered as subsurface passageways, being spaced below the upper surface 27, and having their upper sides effectively covered over by the upper sheet 26.

More specifically, the upper sheet 26 is formed with a plurality of through apertures arranged in generally parallel rows. More specifically, a generally straight row of through apertures 30 is formed in the upper sheet 26 located over and opening downwardly into the subsurface passageway 20. Similarly, a row of through apertures 31 is located in alignment with and over the passageway 21, opening downwardly into the latter, while a row of through apertures 32 is formed in the upper'sheet 26 opening downwardly therethrough into the passageway 22, a row of through apertures 33 being formed in the upper sheet 26, and opening downwardly therethrough into the passageway 23, while an additional row of through apertures 34 is located'in alignment with and over the passageway 24, opening downwardly for communication with the latter passageway. For purposes of illustration and without limiting intent, the number of apertures 30, 31, 32, 33 and 34 in each row is the same and the apertures are in respective lateral alignment with each other. Thus, in addition to the rows of apertures 30-34 each in alignment with a respective passageway 20-24, the apertures may be considered as arranged in lateral rows extending transversely of the passageways, each aperture row including an aperture 30, aperture 31, aperture 32, aperture 33 and aperture 34.

Considering the upper sheet 26 in greater detail, it is preferred that the apertures 30-34 each be of a diameter or dimension longitudinally of its row of like numbered apertures substantially equal to the upper sheet space intermediate an adjacent pair of apertures in the row. That is, the apertures 30-34 of each like numbered row of apertures are equally spaced and of a spacing approximately equal to the aperture dimension longitudinally of the row.

As seen in the assembled view of FIG. 2, the passageways 20-24 each has its opposite ends opening through opposite edges of the board 11. Further, adjacent to the opposite end 21, while the edge cutouts 38 communicate downwardly through sheet 26 into the end regions of passageway 22, the edge cutouts 39 communicating downwardly through sheet 26 into end regions of passageway 23, and cutouts 40 communicating downwardly through sheet 26 into end regions of passageway 24. The cutouts 36-40 are configured and located adjacent to endmost apertures 30-34, being spaced therefrom a distance approximately equal to the interaperture spacing of the like numbered apertures. For example, the interaperture spaces, as at 41, between adjacent pairs of apertures 30 are of a dimension longitudinally of the row of apertures 30 substantially equal to the spacing between the endmost apertures 30 and the adjacent cutouts 36. Thus, the sheet regions 42 each located between a respective cutout 36 and the adjacent aperture 30 is of a dimension longitudinally of the row of apertures 30 approximately equal to the like dimension of the apertures 30 and the interaperture spaces or upper sheet regions 41. Thus, the notches or edge cutouts 36-40 are each spaced from its adjacent aperture 30-34, respectively, a distance equal to the interaperture spacing between the apertures of each like numbered row of apertures.

In addition to the above-described board structure 11, the instant educational and entertainment device includes a plurality of playing pieces, such as elongate planks or barshaped members, one being shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and there generally designated 45, A plurality of such barlike playing pieces 45 are included in the device 10, and shown in plan view in FIG. 3, certain of said playing pieces there being designated 46 and other of said playing pieces there being designated 47. Each of the playing pieces 45 and 46 is subdi vided on one longitudinal face into a plurality, namely four, of generally rectangular segments, which segments are illustrated as generally square and characteristically marked, as by different coloring, shown herein by appropriate symbols. Thus, each four-segment playing piece 45 and 46 is arranged with its segments in a row longitudinally of the playing piece, the segments each having an equal dimension longitudinally of the playing piece, which dimension is equal to the hereinbefore discussed dimensions of apertures 30-34 and interaperture spaces longitudinally of the respective aperture rows.

The plurality of playing pieces 47 are similar to the playing pieces 46, but of lesser length, and subdivided on one longitudinal face into three generally square segments having characteristic markings, say different colors. The segments of the playing pieces 47 are arranged in a row longitudinally of the respective playing piece, and each is of a dimension longitudinally of the playing piece equal to the hereinbefore discussed dimension of apertures 30-34 and interaperture regions longitudinally of the rows of like numbered apertures. Hence, the playing pieces 47 may be essentially similar to the playing pieces 46, but may constitute substantially threefourths of one of the latter. While playing pieces 45, 46 and 47 are illustrated as being of four-segment and three-segment lengths, there may be provided other segment lengths, if desired.

The playing pieces 45, 46 and 47 are all of the same general cross section, adapted to conformably slide into a selected one of the passageways -24. Further, upon such insertion of a playing piece, successive segments are exposed through an upper sheet opening 36-40, and concealed beneath an interopening upper sheet region. As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the elongate barlike playing member or plank 45 has its innermost end segment of orange exposed through the endmost aperture 33, and the next adjacent segment of brown is concealed beneath the sheet region between end aperture 33 and adjacent edge cutout 39.

This operation is best illustrated in the diagrammatic representations of FIGS. 4, S and 6. A three-segment playing piece 48 is shown in FIG. 4 preparatory to insertion into one end of the passageway 23, as in the direction of arrow 50. In FIG. 5 the playing piece 48 has been fully inserted, such that its trailing end edge is generally flush with the edge cutout 39. In this condition the middle or intermediate segment of playing piece 48, characteristically marked in blue, is exposed through the endmost aperture 33, while the end segments are concealed beneath sheet regions on opposite sides of the exposing aperture. An additional three-segment playing piece 51 is shown in FIG. 5, preparatory to endwise insertion, as in the direction of arrow 52, into passageway 23 serving to displace the previously inserted playing piece 48. The fully inserted condition of playing piece 51 is shown in FIG. 6. It will there be apparent that the first inserted playing piece 48 has been shifted rightward to conceal the previously exposed intermediate segment beneath an interaperture region, and expose both the leading end segment marked in orange and the trailing end segment marked in green, through the third and second apertures, respectively, counting from the end of insertion. Further, the last inserted playing piece 51 occupies the space previously occupied by the first inserted playing piece 48, having its trailing end substantially flush with the edge cutout 39, so that the middle or intermediate segment marked in yellow is exposed through the endmost aperture 33 adjacent to the end of insertion, while the end segments are concealed beneath upper sheet regions on opposite sides of the exposing aperture.

As a game, for two, three or four players of all ages, the instant'device has proved thoroughly fascinating, serving to improve planning and memory skills. Such a game may have as its object to produce a specified pattern of markings or colored spots exposed through the apertures 30-34. For example, a game may be played by each player initially choosing one of the four colors shown symbolically. With all playing pieces or planks face down, each player may take two of the longer planks and three of the shorter planks, placing them face up in front of him. Players then take turns inserting planks into slots or passageways, the first player inserting any one of his planks or playing pieces into any one of the passageways. The playing pieces can be inserted in any of the passageways. The playing pieces can be inserted in any of the passageway end openings, and should always be fully inserted so that the trailing end of the inserted plank is flush with the cutout edge of the passageway and no part of the playing piece is left exposed outside of the passageway. After inserting a selected playing piece, a player takes any face-down playing piece and adds it to his unplayed playing pieces, it then being the next players turn to insert a playing piece and take a facedown playing piece.

If insertion of a playing piece in any passageway opening should push a playing piece fully or partly out of the opposite passageway end, the player causing such action removes the pushed out playing piece and keeps it in front of him. The players continue taking turns in the above manner. When the face-down playing pieces are exhausted, play continues and if any player runs out of playing pieces he must drop out of the game. If at any time three spots of the same color appear in a row or series (either across, down or diagonally) the player who chose that color wins the game. None of the playing pieces can be showing outside of the passageways. The game can be made more challenging by requiring that four spots or characteristic markings in a row appear to win.

Of course, other rules may be employed to play other games with the same apparatus, and the device may be advantageously utilized for solitary play as a puzzle, the player attempting to produce certain predetennined patterns of markings, say as shown in FIG. 7, or otherwise. Here again, no playing pieces may be left showing outside of the passageways.

From the foregoing, it is seen that the present invention provides an educational and entertainment device which fully accomplishes its intended objects and is well adapted to meet practical conditions of manufacture, distribution and use.

Although the present invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

1, An educational-entertainment device comprising a board having a playing surface, said board being provided with a plurality of laterally spaced subsurface passageways each opening at opposite ends through spaced regions of said board, there being a row of spaced apertures formed in said playing surface over each of said passageways and opening downwardly thereto, and a plurality of separate elongate playing pieces selectively slidable in said passageways, said playing pieces being longer than the space between adjacent apertures for partial exposure through at least one aperture and partial concealment beneath at least one interaperture space, said playing pieces being subdivided into characteristically marked segments for exposure and concealment according to position in a passageway.

2. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 1, said apertures and said interaperture spaces being of substantially the same dimensions longitudinally of the row, for substantially equal exposure and concealment through an adjacent pair of aperture and interaperture space.

3. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 1, said characteristically marked segments being of substantially equal sizes.

4. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 3, said apertures and said interaperture spaces being of substantially equal dimensions longitudinally of the row and of longitudinal dimensions substantially equal to the longitudinal dimensions of said characteristically marked segments, for concealment and exposure of successive segments, respectively.

5. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 4, said playing pieces being subdivided into at least three characteristically marked segments, and said passageways each being of a length adapted to completely receive at least two of said three-segment playing pieces.

6. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 5, the characteristic markings of said segments being different colors.

7. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 4, said passageway ends opening through opposite edges of said board, and said playing surface being formed with edge cutouts opening downwardly into the end regions of each passageway for finger access thereto.

8. An educational-entertainment device according to claim 7, the apertures of adjacent rows being in alignment with each other laterally of the rows to define a generally rectangular configuration of apertures.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1703159 *Nov 2, 1926Feb 26, 1929Richard MonheimTransformation box
US2536380 *Jan 3, 1950Jan 2, 1951Fred J LucassenGame board with marked game pieces
US2982551 *Mar 4, 1958May 2, 1961Garnett WilliamMovable piece game
US3130972 *Aug 23, 1960Apr 28, 1964Schwarzlander HarryGame board with intersecting channels
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3690671 *Mar 22, 1971Sep 12, 1972Linda F SlutskyEducational color association game
US4222565 *Nov 29, 1978Sep 16, 1980Meyer BerrebiLogical deduction development game
US5437454 *Apr 29, 1994Aug 1, 1995Tri-Tec Industries Ltd.Reciprocating manipulable ball puzzle
US5542673 *Dec 30, 1994Aug 6, 1996Binary Arts CorporationIntersecting manipulable puzzle
US5788236 *Mar 24, 1997Aug 4, 1998Adolph E. GoldfarbApparatus and method of playing a competitive strategy game
US5857674 *Jan 31, 1997Jan 12, 1999Legrand; ChristianInteractive game
US8020870 *Aug 28, 2009Sep 20, 2011Robuck Jr Charlie KPattern recognition and duplication process and game
US20110049803 *Aug 28, 2009Mar 3, 2011Robuck Jr Charlie KPattern recognition and duplication process and game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/264, 273/284, 273/155, 273/282.1
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F9/08, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00328, A63F9/0803, A63F3/00, A63F3/00697, A63F2003/00331
European ClassificationA63F3/00P, A63F3/00, A63F9/08B