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Publication numberUS3601756 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 24, 1971
Filing dateAug 14, 1969
Priority dateAug 14, 1969
Publication numberUS 3601756 A, US 3601756A, US-A-3601756, US3601756 A, US3601756A
InventorsStroh Robert R
Original AssigneeBurroughs Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Terminator connector for multiconductor cable
US 3601756 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Robert R. Stroh Coatesville, Pa. [21] Appl. No. 850,210 [22] Filed Aug. 14, I969 [45] Patented Aug. 24, 1971 [73] Assignee Burroughs Corporation Detroit, Mich.

[54] TERMINATOR CONNECTOR FOR MULTICONDUCTOR CABLE 10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 339/19, 339/176 MF, 339/242 [51] lnt.Cl H0lr 31/08 [50] Field ofSearch 339/14, 17, 19, 176, 242

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,011,639 12/1911 Murrayetal.....'. 339/19X 1,982,501 1 1/1934 Douglas 339/242 2,912,666 I 1/1959 l-Iurvitz 339/61 FOREIGN PATENTS 25,971 l/1961 Germany 4. 339/242 Primary Examiner- Ernest R. Purser Assistant ExaminerRobert A. Hafer Att0rneyCarl Fissell, Jr.

ABSTRACT: A terminator connector is disclosed for use with a multiconductor cable. The connector is formed of a laminate of two layers of conductive material joined to opposite surfaces of a layer of insulating material and the laminate is provided with various types of undulations so as to be able to be inserted between the various conductors of the cable with each conductive layer being extended for connection to a terminal lug. The connector of the present disclosure is particular adaptable for employment with multiconductor cables where alternate conductors are adapted to be shielding conductors which reside at a particular shielding voltage level.

PATENTED AUB24 I971 SHEET 1 OF 2 INVENTOR. BOBERL R. STROH ATTORNEY TERMINATOR CONNECTOR FOR MULTICONDUCTOR CABLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a termination connector for a multiconductor cable and more particularly, to such a connector for a cable having ground shield conductors and signal conductors of a small gaugeor small diameter wire.

In the prior art on transmission lines such as are employed in data-processing systems, various shielding means have been employed to insure that noise and crosstalk are not coupled to the signal carrier. Such shielding means can take various forms such as a flat three-conductor cable where the two outer conductors are grounded to provide an electric shield. By establishing a constant voltage level on such shielding conductors, constant electric fields are created between a signal-carrying conductor and various sources of electric noise including another signal-carrying conductor.

The prior art is replete with many forms of multiconductor connectors. However, such connectors are usually adapted for general purpose use and each conductor in the connector is provided with its own shielding to prevent crosstalk. The end result is that such connectors are complex in structure with a relatively high cost of manufacture. Furthermore, the cost of manufacture is increased when such connectors are to be adapted to cables of small dimension such as might be employed with integrated circuitry and the like. In addition, the small spacing between conductors make it difficult to solder the conductors to different terminals whether the soldering is done manually or by automated techniques.

It is therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an improved connector for multiconductor cables.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved connector for multiconductor cables having small dimensions, which connector does not require soldering.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved connector for small dimension shielded conductors such as might be employed in a data-processing system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Multiconductor flat cables of the type for which the present invention is adapted employ two or more conductors arranged in a row with at least one of the conductors being adapted to carry a different signal than the others. A particular form of thepresent invention comprises a connector having at least two layers of conductive material which are joined to and separated by a layer of an insulation material the combination being of sufficient flexibility as to be fashioned in a curvilinear form so as to be placed in the spacing between the conductors with one of the conductive layers of the connector being in contact with at least one conductor and the other layer of the conductive material making contact with the remaining conductors in the cable. One layer of the conductive material is extended laterally in one direction to make contact with a terminal lug and the other layer of conductive material is extended laterally in the opposite direction to make connection with another terminal lug. The respective terminal contact portions of the different conductive layers can be crimped about their respective terminals and an insulative sheath placed about the entire assembly.

A feature then of the present invention resides in a laminated connector for a multiconductor cable which connector comprises at least two layers of conductive material separated by a layer of insulation, the combination having a physical form such that each layer of conductive material will make contact with different conductors of the cable. Other features reside in such a connector and a method for making such a connector where the connector is adapted to couple a plurality of signal conductors as well as shielding conductors.

The above and other objects and advantages and features of the present invention will become more readily apparent from a review of the following specification when taken in conjunction with the drawings wherein:

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective representation of an embodiment of the present invention which representation illustrates the manner in which it would appear just prior to completion of the respective electrical contacts;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional representation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 which embodiment contains one signal conductor and two shielding conductors;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional representation similar to FIG. 2 except that the embodiment contains two signal conductors and three shielding conductors; and

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional representation similar to FIG. 3 except that the embodiment contains three signal conductors and four shielding conductors.

DESCRIPTION OF THE CONNECTOR A better understanding of the principle features of the present invention will be achieved by reference to FIG. 1 which will now be described and which illustrates a perspective view of one embodiment which view has been exploded to better illustrate those features. As shown therein, cable 13 contains three conductors l4, l5 and 16 which are embedded in a flexible insulating strip 17. Connector 10, which embodies the present invention, is adapted to fit between the respective conductors 14, 15 and 16 and to make electrical contact with these conductors so as to couple conductor 15 to terminal post 11 and at the same time couple conductors 14 and 16 to terminal post 12. A particular utilization of this combination would be one in which conductor 15 carries a signal which is to be received or transmitted to terminal post 11 and where conductors l4 and 16 are to carry the grounded or shielding potential transmitted thereto by tenninal post 12. Once the respective cable conductors, connector and terminal post have been assembled, insulating sleeving 18 may be placed by a sliding motion over the final assembly.

As illustrated in FIG. 1 and as shown in cross-sectional detail in FIG. 2, connector 10 is fonned of two layers 20 and 22 of a conductive material which are joined to opposite surfaces of insulating layer 21. Thus, as illustrated in FIG. 2, conductive layer 20 establishes electrical contact between conductor 15 and terminal post 11 while conductive layer 22 establishes electrical contact between conductors 14 and 16 and terminal post 12.

As will be more thoroughly described below, the respective conductive and insulative materials from which the connector laminate is formed are chosen to be sufficiently malleable and flexible so as to be crimped into place to establish firm electrical contact after assembly.

It will be readily appreciated from a review of FIG. 2 that the connector of the present invention can be employed just as easily to establish electrical contact between a two-conductor cable and the respective terminal posts 11 and 12. That is to say, if cable 13 were to contain only conductors 14 and 15, the laminated connector of the present invention could still be employed to make the required electrical contact. The extra undulation as illustrated in FIG. 2 to make contact with conductor 16 would still be employed to maintain electrical contact with conductor 15.

Other embodiments of the present invention are illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. FIG. 3 illustrates a connector of the present invention which has been adapted to accommodate a five-conductor flat cable wherein the first, third and fifth conductors serve as ground or shielding conductors with the second and fourth conductors serving as individual signal conductors. FIG. 4 is directed toward a connector of the present invention which has been adapted to accommodate a seven-wire flat cable wherein the first, third, fifth and seventh conductors serve as ground or shielding conductors and the second, fourth and sixth conductors serve as individual signal-carrying conductors.

In each of these latter two embodiments, the connector is again formed of a laminate of two conductive layers which are joined to opposite surfaces of an insulative layer. However, in the case of these latter two embodiments, the signal-carrying conductive layer will be etched to form particular conductive patterns as will now be described.

As illustrated in FIG. 3, this embodiment includes one continuous layer 32 which serves as the ground connector and a continuous insulative layer 31. As distinct from the embodiment of FIG. 2, however, the second conductive layer of FIG. 3 is divided into two portions 30 and 33 which respectively make electrical contact with signal conductors and 27. Conductive layer portion 33 is extended beyond insulator layer 31 to make appropriate contact with terminal 36. This extension can be formed by the manner in which the layers are laminated. Also, the connector can be formed of a uniformly laminated sheet where conductive layer portion is etched to extend only to that distance required to provide an appropriate soldering land to which may be attached conductive lead 34 by way of solder connection35 with conductive lead 34 making the appropriate electrical contact with terminal 37.

Referring now to FIG. 4, there is shown therein an embodiment of the present invention adapted to terminate a sevenconductor flat cable wherein the first, third, fifth and seventh conductors are employed as ground shields while the second, fourth and sixth conductors are employed as individual signal conductors. As in the case of the other embodiments of the present invention, the connector of FIG. 4 includes a continuous conductive layer 52 which serves to couple the respective ground shield conductors 42, 44, 46 and 48 to ground terminal 38. Conductive layer 52 is joined to a continuous insulation layer 51. However, as in the embodiment of FIG. 3, the second conductive layer of the connector laminate has been etched in a particular conductive pattern to provide three separate conductive portions 50, 53 and 54. Conductive portions 54 has been extended beyond insulating layer 51 in order to make contact with a particular signal terminal 41. However, conductive portions 50 and 53 are provided only with a dimension sufficient to allow for appropriate soldering lands. Thus, signal conductor 43 is electrically connected to the signal terminal 39 by way of conductive portion 50, solder connection 58 and conductive lead 57. Similarly, signal conductor 45 is electrically connected to signal terminal by way of conductive portion 53, solder connection 56 and conductive lead 55. As described above, signal conductive 47 is connected to signalterminal 40 by way of conductive portion 54. The respective ground shield conductors 42, 44, 46 and 48 are connected to ground terminal 38 by way of conductive layer 52.

While the various embodiments of the present invention can be employed with cables of various dimensions, these embodiments are particularly advantageous for employment with very small dimensioned cables or the so-called minicables. As an example of the dimensions of this latter type cable, each of the conductors l4, l5 and 16 in FIGS. 1 and 2 would have a diameter of 0.012 inches with the distance between centers being approximately 0.025 inches. The corresponding signal and ground terminals 11 and 12, respectively, would be 0.025 inches square with the distance between their centers being 0.l inches. With dimensions of this order of magnitude, the thickness of the connector laminate should be chosen to be as large as possible or approximately 0.010 inches. However, it will be appreciated that, with cable conductors of larger diameters and spacing, the relative thickness of the laminate can be such as to allow greater tolerance and ease of insertion of the connector onto the cable. In this latter situation, the connector, being flexible, could be squeezed together for insertion and upon release would expand to provide appropriate electrical contact with the respective conductors. In either situation, the connector and cable configuration are to be crimped together after assembly to insure electrical contact.

While the above-described dimensions are relatively small, the laminate structure of the connector provides the necessary rigidity even for the relatively small portions of the second conductive layers such as portion 30 in FIG. 3 and portions 50 and 53 in FIG. 4.

The particular material from which the laminate of the present invention is formed may be varied to facilitate their manufacture. While the respective conductor layers 20 and 22, as illustrated in FIG. 2, are preferrably of a beryllium copper, other well-known conductive materials may be employed. Similarly, insulative layer 21 as illustrated in FIG. 2 is preferably Mylar but may be formed of other flexible insulative material.

When the respective materials are of the type stated above as preferred, the particular etching agent for the beryllium copper may be either ferric chloride or chromic-sulfuric acid and the etching agent for Mylar may be concentrated sulfuric acid.

In manufacture, a plurality of connectors of a particular embodiment can be formed by taking a sheet of laminated material, etching the respective patterns on the material by standard techniques employing photoresist masking layers, forming the undulating pattern in the laminate in a die stamp or press and then cutting the thus formed laminated sheet into the individual connectors. Where the dimensions of the connectors are quite small, the cutting operation can be replaced by an etching process employing the etching agents described above.

When the connector is of the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, the etching process is relatively simple since the same pattern is employed on both sides of the laminate to first etch away the first conductive layer of copper beryllium and then to etch away the Mylar insulating layer. However, with the embodiment of FIGS. 3 and 4, an additional pattern is required to etch the first layer of conductive material so as to form the respective conductive portions for the different signal-carrying conductors.

With the embodiments of FIGS. 3 and 4, the additional conductive leads 34 of FIG. 3 and 57 and 55 of FIG. 4 can be formed of strips of beryllium copper which are soldered in place after the body of the connector has been formed. These conductive leads can be flat strips which are then crimped in place at the time that the terminals are connected to the cable. It will be understood that in the above-described stamping operation, the conductive leads which are formed from the body of the'connector will be left without curvature and that they will be crimped in place at the time of connection.

An alternative method of forming the respective embodiments may be employed which does not require either etching or soldering. In this latter method, the respective layers of conductive material are preformed in strips of required width and these strips are then bonded in the appropriate configurations. For example, in the embodiment of FIG. 3, insulator layer 31 would be provided with the dimension as shown and bonded to conductive layer 32. Conductive portion 30 and conductive lead 35 would be formed as one continuous strip; however, this strip would be bonded to layer 31 only to the extent that conductive portion 30 is indicated as being bonded in FIG. 3. Similar changes could be made with the embodiment of FIG. 4.

Once the connection has been made as illustrated in respect with FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 an additional crimping of the connectors about the outer cable conductors may be employed to insure that the connector remains in place.

While the respective embodiments have been illustrated for flat cables having a single row of conductors, it will be appreciated that such connectors can be formed for employment with other cable conductor configurations. For example, the connector of the present invention can be adapted for a configuration of two rows of conductors where alternate conductors are designated as ground shielding conductors.

The invention as described provides an easy means to terminate miniature multiconductor cables. It can also be employed to form a crossover network between the various conductors in the cable. Once the respective connectors have been made, test probes can still be applied to each of the conductive layers which form the connector in order to test for signal transmission. A further advantage of the present invention is that a pair of flat cables may be placed together for connection to the same terminal lugs when such is required. Furthermore, the present invention can be used to connect more than two cables to such lugs, which lugs may be isolated electrically so as to serve only as connecting lugs.

While only specific embodiments of the present invention and methods of forming the present invention have been described and illustrated, changes and modifications therein will be apparent to one skilled in the art which changes and modifications will nevertheless be within the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed is:

l. A connective means for a multiconductor cable comprising:

a flexible layer of insulative material; and

two layers of conductive material joined to opposite surfaces of said layer of insulative material;

said respective layers being continuously joined over contiguous surfaces to form a composite solid body shaped into a configuration for insertion between conductors of said cable where one conductive layer makes electrical contact with at least one conductor and the second conductive layer makes electrical contact with a different conductor.

2. A connective means according to claim 1 wherein:

one of the conductive layers is of sufiicient dimension to make interconnection with two or more conductors of said cable. I 3. A connective means according to claim 1 wherein: the composite solid body is provided with a series of undulations to receive a row of conductors of said cable.

4. A connective means according to claim 1 wherein:

one conductive layer is extended in one direction to facilitate electrical contact with a terminal lug; and

the other conductive layer is extended in the opposite direction to facilitate electrical contact with a second terminal lug.

5. A connective means according to claim 4 wherein:

one of said conductive layers is extended to make electrical contact with a terminal lug having a constant voltage established thereon.

6. A connective means according to claim 4 wherein:

one conductive layer is separated into portions each of e which is adapted to make electrical contact with a different cable conductor.

7. A connective means according to claim 6 wherein:

at least one of said conductive layer portions is provided with a conductive lead, soldered thereto to make electrical contact with a third terminal lug.

8. A connective means according to claim 6 wherein:

at least one of said conductive layer portions is provided with a conductive lead formed as an integral extension thereof to make electrical contact with a third terminal lug.

9. A connective means according to claim 4 including:

a plurality of said combined layers connected to different cables and to said terminal lugs.

10. A connective means according to claim 9 wherein:

said terminal lugs are isolated electrically except for such connective combined layers and the corresponding cables.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1982501 *Jun 13, 1932Nov 27, 1934Douglas Harry AConnecting means
US2912666 *Oct 11, 1955Nov 10, 1959Radiation IncCorrugated strip connector
*DE25971A Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3720903 *May 27, 1971Mar 13, 1973Amp IncFilter assembly for printed circuit board connector
US3922052 *Jul 1, 1974Nov 25, 1975Western Electric CoSnap-on electrical connector
US4707040 *Jul 26, 1985Nov 17, 1987W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Connector for coaxially shielded cable
US4800236 *Jul 8, 1987Jan 24, 1989E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyCable having a corrugated septum
US4898546 *Dec 16, 1988Feb 6, 1990E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyGround plane shield device for right angle connectors
US7686645Aug 19, 2008Mar 30, 2010Fluke CorporationApparatus and method of zeroing a test instrument
US8336190Nov 16, 2010Dec 25, 2012Fluke CorporationMethod of calibrating a test instrument
US9160126Dec 21, 2012Oct 13, 2015Fluke CorporationApparatus and method of zeroing a test instrument
US20100046809 *Aug 19, 2008Feb 25, 2010Marvasti Mazda ASystem and Method For Correlating Fingerprints For Automated Intelligence
US20110151710 *Nov 16, 2010Jun 23, 2011Fluke CorporationApparatus and method of zeroing a test instrument
EP2157671A1Aug 19, 2008Feb 24, 2010Fluke CorporationApparatus and method of zeroing a test instrument
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/510
International ClassificationH01R4/48
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/4809
European ClassificationH01R4/48B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 13, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BURROUGHS CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:BURROUGHS CORPORATION A CORP OF MI (MERGED INTO);BURROUGHS DELAWARE INCORPORATEDA DE CORP. (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004312/0324
Effective date: 19840530