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Publication numberUS3601911 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1971
Filing dateAug 25, 1969
Priority dateAug 25, 1969
Publication numberUS 3601911 A, US 3601911A, US-A-3601911, US3601911 A, US3601911A
InventorsWood Donald L
Original AssigneeConcrete Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Replaceable fork tine wear tip
US 3601911 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

113 is pivoted by pivot 122. The spacing between pivots 121 and 122 is identical to that between pivots 112 and 114 and hence members 111 and 113 are at all times parallel. Such arrangement insures that members 118 are at all times vertical, and thus parallel to back 36 despite angular variation of guide 1 11. I

At the forward end of guide 111 are depending arms 126 which receive the end of rod 127 of cylinder 128, the forward end of which is pivotally connected to pad 129 on back 36. Energization of cylinder 128 controls the vertical inclination of guide 111 and this in turn, as hereinafter explained, controls the inclination of the moldboards 24. It will be understood that cylinder 128 is merely one of several means whereby the pitch of guide 1 11 may be controlled.

Subframe 117 contains a horizontally disposed fabricated member 131 formed with a downwardly opening slideway 132 in which reciprocates slidable crosshead 133. Crosshead 133 has outward projecting lugs 134 on either side at its front. The rearward end of crosshead 133 is connected to the rod 136 of horizontal cylinder 137 which is supported on subframe 117. Energization of cylinder 137 causes movement of crosshead 133 in slideway 132.

Pivoted to subframe 117 is a first spreader link frame 141, said frame receiving vertical pivot axes 142 at the top and 143 at the b0tt0m,-respectively. It is important that link frame 141 as well as link frame 146 which is pivoted thereto are at all times vertical. Frame 146 is pivotally connected to frame 141 by vertical pivot shaft 147. A pin sleeve 148 surrounds pin 147 at the junction of link frames 141 and 146. A connecting rod 149 is pivotally connected to lug 134 and also to sleeve 148.

Moldboard 24 approximately two-thirds rearward of its forward end is provided with a plate 151. Pivoted to plate 151 by horizontal pivot 152 is a bracket 153 having an overhanging lip 154 which is on the inside of plate 151. The outer ends of link frame 146 are pivotally connected to cars 156 on bracket 153 by means of vertical pivot 157. Movement of crosshead 131 therefore causes inward and outward movement of moldboard 24, the link frames 141, 146 pivoting around the axes 142-143, 147 and 157 in a grasshopper linkage movement which is illustrated schematically in FIG. 4. In the solid line position of FIG. 4 the link frames 141 and 146 are extended outwardly almost their entire extent of travel, whereas in dotted line position they are folded to a position where the moldboards 24 are parallel to guide 111 and of minimum width.

Auxiliary to the cylinder 137 on either side of the machine is a cylinder 161 connected to a bracket extending rearward from members 118 with its rod 162 connected to hinge sleeve 148. Cylinders 161 have common connections with cylinder 137 and assist the latter in folding link frame 146 and thus in moving the moldboards inward and outward.

Subframe 117 also is provided with a cab 166 elevated above guide 111 and containing an operators seat 167 and a console 168 having a plurality of valve levers for energization of the various hydraulic controls which are installed on the machine. It is a feature of the construction that the cab 166 is always horizontal by reason of the fact that subframe 117 is likewise always horizontal. Further, the seat 167 is elevated above the level of motor 31 and pump 32 so as to give the operator an unobstructed view forwardly of the machine. However, the moldboards 24 are elevated at a steeper slope than the guide rod 111, and hence the seat 167 is generally below the level of the moldboards during normal operation of K the machine.

REAR WHEELS AND SPOILER BLADES On the rear end of each moldboard 24 are hinge brackets 201 receiving hinge pin 202. Also received by pin 202 is an upper arm 203 which extends inward and is connected to downward bracket 204. The lower end of bracket 204 is connected to rod 206 of cylinder 207, the forward end of which is pivotally connected to the moldboard. The lower end of bracket 204 receives shaft 208, the inner end of which is connected on pin 202. The forward end of wheel mounting plate 213 pivots on shaft 208. The rearward end of plate 213 carries axle 214 on which is mounted rear wheel 216. Cylinder 221 is pivoted at its forward end to a sleeve 222 on pin 202 which is fixed by brace 220 to bracket 204 and the rod 223 of cylinder 221 is connected to the rearward end of plate 213. Hence energization of cylinder 221 pivots plate 213 relative to shaft 208 and thus raises and depresses the wheel 216 relative to the moldboard 24.

Also on hinge pin 202 are hinge ears 231 connected to L- shaped bracket 232. Spoiler blade 236 is pivoted to bracket 231 about pivot 237. Cylinder 238 is connected at one end to bracket 232 and its rod 239 is connected to spoiler blade 236. Energization of cylinder 230 thus causes blade 236 to swing about pivot 237. About midway outward of spoiler blade 236 is a guide 241 which is vertically disposed in the horizontal position of blade 236. The outer edge of L-shaped bracket 232 is received in guide 241. Hence as blade 236 pivots around pivot 237, it is kept in contact with bracket 232. Tie rod 242 is connected at its outer end by means of swivel joint 243 to the outer end of bracket 232 and at its inner end by means of swivel joint 244 to wheel mounting plate 213. Tie rod 242 performs two functions. In normal usage of the machine it provides a brace supporting the blade 236 against the thrust imposed upon it. Its second function is in transportation. When the machine is being transported from one location to another, wheel 216 is depressed and rod 239 contracted. Tie rod 242 pulls blade 236 and wheel 216 in relationship to each other so that the blade is automatically pivoted above the level of wheel 216 and inward, as is best shown in solid lines in FIG. 14. Hence the blade 236 does not project outward beyond wheel 216 and highway width of load requirements are observed.

As has previously been noted, it is desirable that wheel 216 be pointed in the same direction as wheels54 despite changes in position of moldboards 24. The body 246 of the hydraulic valve controlling cylinder 207 is mounted for sliding in a longitudinal direction on slide 247 fixed to blade 24. The conventional hydraulic valve spool 248 of valve body 246 siides within said body. The forward end of spool 248 is connected by universal joint 249 to rod 251 and the forward end of rod 251 is connected to an ear 252 which pivots with frame 146. The rearward end of spool 248 is connected by universal joint 253 to rearward extending rod 254, the rearward end of which is connected by pivot 256 to bracket 204. As the spool 248 is moved within body 246, depending upon the positions of rods 251 and 254, energization of cylinder 207 is likewise controlled. The hydraulic connections between valve body 246 and cylinder 207, as will readily be understood by one skilled in the hydraulic control art, are such as to center spool 248 within valve body 247. Hence despite movement of mold board 24 relative to the axis 154, bracket 204 is swung about axis 202 to maintain shaft 208 and hence to maintain axle 214 parallel to axle 53. The mounting of body 246 on slide 247 accommodates the vertical component of the movement of the moldboard.

OPERATION In normal operation of the device, the operator seated on seat 167 manipulates the hydraulic controls 168 which govern the various double-acting hydraulic cylinders which are energized from pump 32 driven by motor 31. One or more tractors pull the machine and cause it to move along the ditch. As the tractors advance, the operator actuates the controls for cylinders 67 to steer wheels 54 along the desired course. As has been previously described, automatic means causes the rear wheels 216 to be parallel to wheels 54. The operator also controls cylinder 46 to raise or lower lister 21 and all of the elements rearward of said lister relative to wheels 54 and thus the depth of the ditch is controlled. When the lister 21 is at the f desired depth, cylinder 46 is readjusted to maintain such PATENTED M1831 IQTI 3,601, 911

ana /0' L. Wood REPLACEAIBLE FORM THNE WEAR HP The invention herein generally relates to wear tips for fork tines and the like, and is more particularly concerned with a uniquely configured and mounted wear tip releasably secured to a fork tine through an adapter rigidly affixed to the tine.

The tips or leading ends of various types of material handling equipment, and in particular log forks, are subject to excessive wear requiring frequent repair or replacement, which in turn involves considerable down time for the involved equipment. It is a primary intention of the instant invention to provide a unique wear tip for such equipment which is releasably mounted by appropriate quick release means, such as knockout pins, whereby the replacement of the tip involves substantially no down time and can be effected in the field as easily as in the shop.

Other advantages include the provision of a fork tip configured so as to provide a better pickup angle for logs, and a tip profile contemplated to reduce damage to material handled thereby, the actual wear on the tip mounting tines also being substantially reduced, thus in effect providing a longer operative life therefor.

Basically, the objects of the instant invention are achieved through the provision of a wear tip mounted on a fork tine through an adapter rigidly affixed to the forward end of the tine and projecting forwardly therefrom. The tip includes a rearwardly opening socket bordered by a pair of rearwardly projecting ears, the socket and ears receiving a forwardly projecting portion of the adapter therebetween and therein for a selective locking of the tip to the adapter by a pair of opposed keeper pins extending into the opposite ends of a common bore. The adapter and tip have inclined upper surfaces which follow the inclination or slope of the tine with the forward end portion of the top converging at a sharper angle to the rounded forward edge. The upper and lower surfaces of the tip are provided with depressions therein for ease of movement of the tip beneath the particular material to be engaged.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a log fork tine with the replaceable wear tip of the instant invention mounted thereon;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially on a plane passing along line 2-2 in FIG, 1;

FIG. 3 is a transverse cross-sectional view taken substantially on a plane passing along line 3-3 in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of the wear tip, adapter and mounting pins.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral is used to generally designate a conventional log fork tine. The replaceable wear tip of the instant invention is generally designated by reference numeral 12, while the adapter utilized in mounting the tip 12 on the leading end portion of the tine ill is designated by reference numeral 14.

The adapter 114 is permanently mounted on or affixed to the modified leading end of the tine it) so as to constitute a mounting means for the replaceable wear tip 12. In order to accommodate the adapter 114, the leading end of the tine 10 provides a vertical face inwardly of which extends a transversely elongated socket llti consisting of a wide forwardly directed rectangular mouth 18, the sides of which converge inwardly from the peripheral edges of the tine 10 at the vertical leading end thereof. The converging sides of the mouth 18 terminate in a flat base 20 across which extends a further rectangular depression 22, thus providing in effect a stepped socket 16. The rear of the adapter M is provided with a rearwardly extending projection which conforms to and is closely received within the socket 16. This projection, designated by reference numeral 24, includes a rearwardly extending truncated portion 26 received within the socket mouth portion l8,

and a rearwardly projecting transversely elongated rectangular portion 221i received within the socket depression 22. When the adapter projection 24 is received within the socket lb and the adapter 14 permanently affixed, as by welding, to the forward end of the tine ill), the opposed vertical sides 3d of the adapter 14 constitute substantially coplanar continuations of the opposed sides of the tine ill). By the same token, the lower surface 32 of the adapter 14 constitutes a horizontal continuation of the horizontal lower surface of the tine l0, while the slightly inclined upper surface 34 of the adapter 114 constitutes a coplanar continuation of the inclined upper surface of the tine l0.

The forward portion of the adapter 114 constitutes a for wardly projecting transversely elongated locking tongue 36 inwardly offset from the four tine surface continuing faces 36, 32 and 34. The upper and lower surfaces 38 and 4b of the torn gue 36 converge forwardly, across the full width thereof, along arcuate paths, terminating in a full width rectangular forwardly extending projection 42. The opposed sides 44 of the locking tongue 36 are flat and vertical, extending rearwardly into a centrally located notch 46 defined within each side face 30 of the adapter 14. Transversely along the rear edge of each of the arcuate converging portions 38 and 40 a pair of undercut shoulders 48 and 50 are provided, such shoulders occurring between each of the surfaces and the corresponding top or bottom face of the adapter 14. Each of the shoulders 48 and 50 is in turn slightly arcuate or forwardly convex along the width of the adapter 14. i l

The wear tip 112 is provided with a transversely elongated rearwardly directed socket 52 which is internally configured so as to closely conform to and snugly receive the adapter tongue 36, the socket 52 thereby including an enlarged mouth having upper and lower arcuately converging surfaces ter minating in an inwardly extending generally rectangular depression into which the tongue projection 42 seats. The upper andlower rearwardly directed edge portions of the tip 12, above and below the socket 52, are transversely arcuate and beveled so as to closely conform to and seat against the adapter shoulders 48 and 50. In addition, the rear of the tip 112 is provided with a pair of integral vertically orientated rearwardly directed ears 54 which are received and seated in the opposed side adapter notches 46, the inner faces of the cars 54 constituting coplanar continuations of the opposed vertical end walls of the socket 52 for a flat engagement against the opposed end walls 44 of the adapter tongue 36. When the replaceable wear tip 12 is fully seated on the adapter 14, the opposed vertical side faces 56 thereof constitute continuations of the vertical sidewalls 30 of the adapter; In addition, the bottom face 58 of the tip l2 constitutes a horizontal coplanar continuation of the bottom face 32 of the adapter 14. This bottom surface 54*; of the tip 12 includes a concave relatively wide depression 60 therein for facilitating a movement of the tip beneath the material to be elevated. by the fork carrying unit. The upper surface of the tip 12 includes a rear portion '62 which is coplanar with the upper surface 34 of the adapter 14 and follows the inclination thereof to approximately the front to rear center of the tip 12. The forward portion 64 of the upper surface of the tip 12 slopes downwardly at a greater inclination than that of the rear portion 62, terminating in a rounded or convex full width forward edge (vb on the tip i2. In this manner, there is a tendency for less damage to the material being handled during the pickup operation. By the same token, the angle of the forward portion 64 of the upper surface of the tip l2 provides for a better pickup of logs or the like. The upper surface of the tip 12 is also provided with a transversely elongated depression 68 therein, this depression occurring partially in each of the sections 62 and 64. Noting FIG. 4 in particular, it will be appreciated that the opposed sides 70 of the depression are angled inwardly, providing an obtuse angle with the bottom wall or walls of the depression 6t} whereby no sharp comers are formed which would tend to collect dirt. The upper depression 68 facilitates a movement of the fork tine wear tip l2 beneath the material to be elevated, providing a reduced area of contact and what amounts to spaced material supporting side edges.

The actual releasable locking of the wear tip 12 to the adapter 14, and hence the tine 10, is effected by means of a pair of elongated knockout pins 72. The pins 72 are received through holes 74 in the opposed wear tip ears 54 and into the opposite ends of an elongated bore 76 which extends transversely through the adapter tongue 36 in general alignment with the opposed ear receiving notches 46. This bore 76 has the opposite ends thereof countersunk as at 78 so as to define a pair of seats for split lock rings 80 which are selectively engaged within ring grooves 82 provided on the pins 72 for a releasable retention of the pins 72 in a tip locking position as best seen in FIG. 3. The ring grooves 82 on the pin 72 are so orientated as to, when in locked engagement with the rings 80, provide sufficient outer end portions on the pins 72 so as to extend completely through the corresponding ears 54 to the outer faces thereof, the major portion of each of the pins 72 projecting interiorly through the bore or passage 76. The forward end of each of the pins 72 is slightly conical in shape, tapering to a reduced extreme end for ease of engagement of the pins 72 through the corresponding split lock rings 78. In actually mounting the wear tip 12, the rings 80 are positioned in their corresponding seats 78, and the tip 12 slid on the adapter 14 with the tip ears 54 confining the rings 80 and with the ear holes 74 aligning with the tongue bore 76. Upon an alignment thereof, the pins 72 are driven inwardly through the opposite sides of the adapter mounted tip 12 until the rings 80 lock within the ring receiving grooves 82 in the pins 72. When so mounted, the tip 12 is fixedly secured to the adapter 14 with the multiple aligning bearing faces, including the surfaces of the socket 52 and the tongue 36 received therein, the undercut shoulders 48 and 50 and the tip rear edge portions received thereagainst, and the notch received ears 54, providing for a highly stable tip which, while removable, is, when mounted, operable in the manner of an integral extension of the fork tine. Should it become necessary to remove the tip 12 for repair or replacement, all that is reou'ired is the inward driving of one of the pins 72 so as to engage and outwardly drive the second pin 72, utilizing a force sufficient so as to spring the lock rings 80 outwardly for enabling the passage of first one pin 72 and then the other pin 72 therethrough. After a remoyal of the first pin 72, the second pin 72 can either be continuously driven so as to follow the first pin, or it can be driven from the opposite side thereof, an appropriate elongated driving rod being utilized.

' From the foregoing, it should be appreciated that a highly unique replaceable fork tine wear tip has been defined. This tip, when mounted through a uniquely constructed and configured adapter, constitutes a highly rigid wear tip for the corresponding tine, in addition to incorporating the unique ability to be easily and quickly removed for either repair or replacement through the utilization of a pair of knockout pins capable of being quickly inserted and removed even under field conditions. In this manner, as will be appreciated, the down time of the log forks, or for that matter any other type of similar material moving equipment upon which the wear tips are utilized, is maintained at a minimum.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. Replaceable wear tip construction for a fork tine or the like comprising a wear tip and an adapter for mounting said tip on a fork tine, said adapter including forward, rear, side, top and bottom faces, a forwardly projecting tongue transversely elongated along said forward face, said tongue having a top, bottom and opposed sides inwardly offset from the corresponding faces of the ada ter, said wear tip having forward, rear, opposed side, top an bottom faces, a tongue receiving socket extending inwardly through the rear face of the tip, a transverse bore through the adapter tongue, a pair of transversely aligned holes through the opposed side faces of the tip alignable with the bore upon a reception of the adapter tongue within the tip socket, and removable pin means received through said tip holes and said adapter tongue bore for a releasable locking of the tip to the adapter, said adapter including notches in the opposed side faces thereof constituting rearward extensions of the opposed sides of the tongue, said notches being vertically spaced from the upper and lower edges of each side face, said tip including a pair of rearwardly projecting ears to the opposite sides of the socket therein, said ears being receivable within the adapter notches, the opposed side faces of said tip being coplanar with the side faces of the adapter upon a reception of the tip ears within the adapter notches, the top and bottom of said tongue converging forwardly along arcuate paths and terminate in a rectangular full width forwardly extending projection, the socket in said tip having an internal configuration conforming to the external configuration ofthe tongue, said pin means comprising a pair of knockout pins insertable inwardly through the pair of tip holes and into the opposite ends of the aligned bore, and lock ring means seated at the opposite ends of the bore and retained therein by the tongue receiving tip for the releasable locking of the pins therein.

2. The construction of claim 1 wherein the forward face of the adapter, both above and below the tongue, defines a full width undercut shoulder, each shoulder being longitudinally convex, the rear face of the tip, both above and below the socket, defining a longitudinally concave beveled edge mateable with the corresponding adapter shoulder.

3. The construction of claim 2 wherein the top face of the tip is inclined from the rear face to the front face, the inclination from the rear face to approximatelymidpoint on the tip being less than the inclination from midpoint to the forward face, the forward face of said tip constituting a rounded relatively narrow edge.

4. The construction of claim 3 wherein the rear face of the adapter includes a rearwardly extending transversely elongated projection for a locked engagement within the forward end of a fork tine, said projectionbeing located in spaced relation to and between the top and bottom faces of said adapter.

5. Replaceable wear tip construction for a fork tine or the like comprising a wear tip and an adapter for mounting said tip on a fork tine, said adapter including forward, rear, side, top and bottom faces, a forwardly projecting tongue transversely elongated along said forward face, said tongue having a top, bottom and opposed sides inwardly offset from the corresponding faces of the adapter, said wear tip having forward, rear, opposed side, tip and bottom faces, a tongue receiving socket extending inwardly through the rear face of the tip, a transverse bore through the adapter tongue, a pair of transversely aligned holes through the opposed side faces of the tip alignable with the bore upon a reception of the adapter tongue within the tip socket, and removable pin means received through said tip holes and said adapter tongue bore for a releasable locking of the tip to the adapter, said adapter including notches in the opposed side faces thereof constituting rearward extensions of the opposed sides of the tongue, said notches being vertically spaced from the upper and lower edges of each side face, said tip including a pair of rearwardly projecting ears to the opposite sides of the socket therein, said ears being receivable within the adapter notches, the opposed side faces of said tip being coplanar with the side faces of the adapter upon a reception of the tip ears within the adapter notches, said pin means comprising a pair of knockout pins insertable inwardly through the pair of tip holes and into the opposite ends of the aligned bore, and lock ring means seated at the opposite ends of the bore and retained therein by the tongue receiving tip for the releasable locking of the pins therein.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US894175 *Feb 24, 1908Jul 28, 1908Rudolph MatakSeparable tooth for power-shovel dippers.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3912020 *Apr 1, 1974Oct 14, 1975Fiat Allis Construct MachineRenewable self-sharpening ripper tooth
US4326348 *Jul 30, 1980Apr 27, 1982Esco CorporationExcavating tooth assembly
US5205057 *Sep 18, 1992Apr 27, 1993Caterpillar Inc.Retaining mechanism for a tooth assembly
US5937551 *Nov 7, 1997Aug 17, 1999Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc.Lock system for excavating tooth point and adapter
US5956874 *May 7, 1998Sep 28, 1999Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc.Tooth assembly and lock system
US5966849 *May 7, 1998Oct 19, 1999Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc.Lock system for excavating tooth point and adapter and for rigging
US20070256335 *Feb 4, 2005Nov 8, 2007Italricambi SpaTooth for an Excavator Bucket
EP1174547A1 *Jul 17, 2001Jan 23, 2002Ihc Holland N.V.Assembly of a tooth and an adapter for an excavator, such as a cutter or the like
WO1990004685A1 *Dec 19, 1988May 3, 1990Caterpillar Inc.Two pin fastening assembly
WO2005080695A1 *Feb 4, 2005Sep 1, 2005Italricambi SpaTooth for an excavator bucket
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/457, 172/713
International ClassificationE02F9/28, B66F9/12
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/12, E02F9/2841
European ClassificationB66F9/12, E02F9/28A2C2