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Publication numberUS3602690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1971
Filing dateOct 3, 1968
Priority dateOct 3, 1968
Publication numberUS 3602690 A, US 3602690A, US-A-3602690, US3602690 A, US3602690A
InventorsHohman Ross W, Johnson Charles J Crafton F Do, Rosenberg William
Original AssigneeMaryland Cup Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
A quick acting air heater
US 3602690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors William Rosenberg;

Charles J. Crattou; F. Dougla Johnson; RoesW.llohman,allo1Baltlmore,Md. [21] Appl. No. 795,752 [22] Filed Oct. 3, 1968 livision of Ser. No. 418,434, Dec. 15, 1964 Pat. No. 3,439,590 [45] Patented Aug. 31, 1971 [73] Assignee Maryhnd Cup Corporation ims [54] A QUICK ACTING AIR HEATER 4 Chins, 16 Drawing Figs. [52] US. (1. 219/373, 53/33, 93/55.! R, 156/497,2l9/365,219/374 [51] Int. (L 1105b 3/02, F24h 3/06, C09j 5/10 [50] Field Search 219/359, 365-376, 379-382, 302; 53/375, 373, 388, 33, 39; 93155.1; 156/497 [56] ReferencesCited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,052,834 2/1913 Lawrence 219/365 1,566,989 12/1925 Skolnik 219/370 2,109,279 2/1938 Soverhill 219/365 Primary Examiner-A. Bartis Atmrney-l3irch and Birch ABSTRACT: A quick acting air heater comprises a cylindrical shell and a perforated plate secured to one end of the shell. A solid cylindrical core member is coaxially disposed within the shell, adjustable means being provided for holding it in position relative to the shell. The core member is provided with air passages extending longitudinally and radially inward from its periphery. One or more electrical heaters are embedded in the core displaced from the slots. Means are provided for directing air from a source outside the shell longitudinally through the slots. This provides a highly sensitive heater which is quickly responsive to high temperature requirements. An important feature resides in the fact that no air space exists between the heater and the slots to insulate or retard the flow of heat to the slots.

PATENTEU m3] 19m sum 1 [if a INVIEN'IURS AM ROSENBERG LES .1. GRAFTON WlLLl CHAR F. DOUGLAS JOHNSON ROSS w. HOHMAN FIG. 2.

[Ow/"1M1 ATTORNEY PATENIED AUBB] lEiYl SHEET 2 BF 4 m m F FIG. 4.

PA PER STOCK PLASTIC METAL FOIL ADHESIVEX Z 34 3 35 PLASTIC PAPER STOCK FIG. 5.

INVENTORJ WILLIAM ROSENBERG CHARLES J. CRAF TON F. DOUGLAS JOHNSON ROSS W. HOHMAN ATTORNFY PATENTED was] wen sum 3 [IF 4 52 INVENTURS WILLIAM ROSENBERG CHARLES J. GRAFTON F. DOUGLAS JOHNSON ROSS W. HOHMAN A QUICK ACTING AIR HEATER This is a division of our application for Pat., Ser. No. 418,434, filed Dec. 15, 1964, now U.S. Pat. No.'3,439,590.

. This invention relates to paper cups; and it is more particularly concerned with the manufacture of such cups.

A popular form of paper cup in wide, general use is known in the industry as the flat bottom cup. lit is made, generally, of a circular bottom wall having a downwardly extending flange and a frustoconical sidewall the bottom of which fits around the flange of the bottom wall. A marginal extension of the sidewall is bent around the flange of the bottom wall and securely fitted to it by a bottom expander. These two parts, so arranged relative to each other, are glued together, the glue being applied at a convenient step in the assembly of the blanks which form these parts.

In recent years, the industry has developed many improvements in these cups. A significant improvement is the coating of the inside surfaces of the cups with a plastic material to form a barrier against hot liquids, like coffee, and cold liquids to prevent them from coming into contact with and being absorbed by the porous paper. In many instances, these coatings are applied to the cup after their'manufacture.

It has been suggested that the plastic coating might be applied to. the surface of the blank members before they are assembled and that the paper coating be utilized as the sealing agent in lieu of the conventional glue.

Attempts to carry out this procedure have met with many difficulties. An important difficulty resides in the fact that the plastic material must be heated to the point of tackiness in order for it to be available as a bonding agent. However, in this tacky condition, it is difficult to handle the blanks on the assembly machinery. Slippage necessary to position the blank sections relative to each other is markedly reduced. Also, the surface of the mandrels are exposed to the tacky plastic causing the machinery to become fouled and requiring frequent stoppage and cleaning of the parts affected.

Also, it has been a problem to produce cups of this kind from laminated sheets, such as paper cup stock laminated with aluminum foil, a formidable difficulty being the partial delamination or separation of the plies from each other under the heat required to soften the plastic coating. As a result, partial separation of the plies is encountered.

The general object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of manufacturing flat bottom cups from plastic-coated blanks.

A specific object of the invention is the provision of such an improved method which is adaptable to commercial automatic cup-making machinery and by means of which the plastic coating does not interfere or adversely affect the operation of the machinery.

Another object of the invention is the provision of such a method which is highly effective and reliable in commercial operations.

A further object of the invention is the provision of such a method which is applicable to the production of cups from laminated sheet material, such as sheets of ordinary paper cup stock laminated with aluminum .foil.

These and still further objects, advantages, and features will appear more fully from the following description together with the accompanying drawings. The invention comprises briefly a high sensitivity air heater which is quickly responsive to high temperature requirements, having a cylindrical shell and a perforated plate at one end of the shell. These perforations are preferably in the form of two concentric circles. A cylindrical core of solid material is coaxially disposed within the shell. Means may be provided for adjustably supporting the core coaxially of the shell in spaced relation to the inner wall surface of the shell. The air passages in the core are formed by slots in the core extending longitudinally of the core and radially inward from the periphery. Anelectrical heater is embedded in the core and means are provided for directing air from an outside source into the shell through the slot passages in the direction of the perforated plate.

' mandrels with modifications in accordance with this invention and illustrating the series of steps in the formation of the cups.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a blank member used in forming the sidewall of the cup.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a blank member used in forming the bottom wall of the cup.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing a modified form of the blank.

FIG. 6 is a schematic longitudinal cross sectional view of the blank members of FIGS. 3 and 4 at one station in the series of assembly operations apart from the machine as awhole.

FIG. '7 is a schematic longitudinal cross-sectional view of the same blank member in a subsequent step in the method-of assembly designated as the initial heating station and showing in section a fragmentary portion of the unit used to direct controlled hot air to the blank members.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the same blank members in a subsequent step of the method showing diagrammatically the member used to curl the end marginal portion of the wall blank about the flange of the bottom blank.

FIG. 9 is a schematic view of the same blank parts in a subsequent step of the process illustrating the condition at the second heating stage.

FIG. 10 is a longitudinal sectional view showing the relation of the parts at a subsequent step generally referred to in the art as bottom expansion.

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of one of the hot air units partly broken away.

FIG. 12 is an end elevational view of the unit of FIG. Il.

FIG. E3 is a sectional view along the line 13-13 of FIG. 1 1.

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view along the line 14-14 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 15 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale of a fragmentary portion of a cup madein accordance with this invention by the use of plastic-coated blank members.

FIG. i6 is a view similar to FIG. 15 by the use of blank members plastic-coated on one side and metal foil laminated on the opposite side of the sidewall part.

Referring with more particularity to the drawing, the rotary turret shown in FIG. 1 comprises a conventional hub member 21 having frustoconical mandrels 22 secured thereto and extending radially outwardly therefrom. The turret is conventionally rotated intermittently by means (not shown), whereby the mandrels are successively positioned adjacent stations at which various steps in the process of forming the cups are carried out. The sequence comprises, generally, placing on each mandrel at station A a blank 23 that is to form the bottom section of the cup and then at subsequent station C a blank 24 that is to form the sidewall. The blank 23 is disposed at the outer end of the mandrel and the blank 24 is disposed around the circumference of the mandrel. The ends 25 and 26 of the blank 24 are lapped and secured together on the mandrel at station C by conventional means not shown. At subsequent stations, these blanks are secured together to form the cup which is finally discharged from the mandrel.

in the process of forming cups from ordinary paper stock, the blank 23 forming the bottom of the cup is secured to the sidewall by gluing. When plastic-coated blanks are used, it is possible to dispense with the glue by heating the parts of the blanks to be joined together to the point of tackiness of the plastic coating. One method of accomplishing this is described in U.S. Re Pat. No.-25,302, wherein the blanks are heated to render the plastic tacky and then are moved relative to each other to position the members in proper relation to each other.

A problem is involved in heating the plastic to the point of When the blanks are in-their final position, heat is difficult to penetrate the layer of paper, paper being a substantial heat insulator. Consequently, in prior methods, the heat is applied directly to the plastic layer or to both sides of the paper stock where the plastic is to be heated to a point of tackiness in order to achieve the condition of tackiness in the short interval of time available. In accordance with the present invention, controlled heat is applied at two separate stations. At the first or preheating station D, the heat is applied in an amount just sufficient to bring the plastic coating to a condition of impending tackiness. For polyethylene coatings, a temperature of about 750 F. is preferred when a dwell period of about 0.3 to 0.5 seconds is used. The heat is applied through the medium of hot air. At the second heating station F, the temperature is increased and an added quantity of heat is supplied to bring the coating to a condition of tackiness. For polyethylene plastic, a temperature of about 850 F. for the same dwell period has been found satisfactory for this purpose.

Between the station D and the station F, the blank parts 23 and 24 are subjected to a conventional operation known as curling," whereby an annular marginal portion 27 of the blank 24 is bent around the flange 26 of the blank 23 in preparation of a final forming step known as bottom expansion." Consequently, as the heating station F is reached, the blank parts are in position for the final forming operation and the heating is provided to effect or to cause the plastic to become tacky. The final forming step takes place at station G and consists of the conventional bottom expansion (see FIG. 10) whereby the curled portion 25 is pressed into final position. This is diagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 10 by means of an inside roller 27 and an exterior anvil 28. However, in actual commercial operations, a more elaborate mechanism is used. See US.

.Pat. No. 2,842,033.

At the succeeding station 11, the completed cup is discharged from the mandrel by directing a blast of air through an axial passageway 31 of the mandrel to a diffuser 32 having openings 33 at the periphery. in passing from the station II to the station A, the mandrel is subjected to a'cooling operation by continuing the blast of air to bring its temperature to a point below the softening temperature of the plastic. Unless this were done, the blanks placed on the mandrel at the start of the cycle of operation would have their plastic coating become tacky. Hence, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to manipulate the blank members on the mandrel. Also, the tacky plastic would foul the mandrel and require wasteful stopping of the operation to clean them. The efficiency of the operation from the standpoint of heat flow can be sharply controlled by adjusting the amount of heat extracted at this point so as to prevent the plastic from becoming tacky and subsequently adding only that amount of heat required to supplement the residual heat in the mandrels at the station D.

The use of the preheating station D is especially important in the manufacture of cups from laminated materials, such as paper stock, having a laminated metal foil 34 on'one side of the paper stock 35 and the plastic coating 36 on the opposite side (see FIG. 5). Adhesive materials 37 used to secure the laminates together soften under the temperatures used to soften the plastic coating and may, in fact, be the same material. Consequently, it is important that heat applied to the laminated sheets be such as to avoid separation of these laminates. This is effectively accomplished in accordance with the present invention where the final heating step to soften the coating is not applied until the blanks are in their final relative positions except for thebottom expansion step. The latter be disposed at the stations in alignment with the mandrels 22 as they come to rest at these stations. The ad acent end of the cylinder is provided with a plate 40 having a circular groove 41. The groove is provided with two radially spaced circular rows of apertures 42 and 43 on either side of the center 44 of the groove. The center of the groove has substantially the same diameter as the'bottom edge .45 of the cup so that the apertures 43 on the inner row are directed toward the inside of the cup while the outer row 42 is directed toward the outside. The plate 40 is secured to an inner flange 46 of retaining rings 47 of an outer cylinder 48 by means of bolts 49.

On the interior of the cylindrical shell 39, there is mounted a cylindrical core 50 of a diameter less than the insidediameter of the shell 39 so that it is disposed coaxially'therewith in spaced relation to the shell. The core isheld in the axial position by means of setscrews 51 passing through the shell and contacting the core.

The core is provided with a series of radial slots 52 that extend longitudinally from one end of the core to the other end through which air to be heated is directed from an air compressor (See FIG. 11) into the'shell through an opening 53 of an end wall 54 at the opposite end of the shell. The core is also provided with a pair of longitudinal bores 55 and 56in which there are embedded electrical heating elements 57 and 58, respectively. A third longitudinal bore 59 is provided with a thermocouple 60 for connection to a temperature gauge and regulator (not shown).

The shell 48 is provided with mounting lugs 61 and a sheet of insulation 62 about the outer surface to reduce heat radiation losses.

lclaim:

1. An air heater comprising a cylindrical shell, a perforated plate at one end of the shell, a solid cylindrical core member coaxially disposed within said shell, said core member having longitudinal air passages in the form of relatively thin radial slots, an electrical heater embedded in said core displaced fromsaid radial slots, means for directing air from an outside source into the said shell through said passages in the direction of the pierforated plate, and adjustable means for supporting the lateral surface of the core in coaxial spaced relation to the inner wall surface of the shell.

2. An air heater as defined by claim 1 in which the perfora-.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3846616 *Mar 12, 1973Nov 5, 1974Mcquay Perfex IncPortable gas heater
US4007670 *Feb 14, 1975Feb 15, 1977St. Regis Paper CompanyInsulated container
US4074619 *Nov 10, 1976Feb 21, 1978The Mead CorporationHeading machine
US5992489 *Aug 28, 1997Nov 30, 1999Sweetheart Cup Company Inc.Cup forming machine
US6139481 *Apr 1, 1999Oct 31, 2000Sweetheart Cup Company, Inc.Gas fired burner for sealing single and double sided polycoated paper cups
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/473, 493/109, 53/477, 53/323, 392/494, 156/497
International ClassificationF24H3/04
Cooperative ClassificationF24H3/0405
European ClassificationF24H3/04B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 8, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: SWEETHEART CUP COMPANY INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS COLLATERAL AGENT;REEL/FRAME:006687/0491
Effective date: 19930830
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS COLLATERAL AGENT;REEL/FRAME:007029/0011
Apr 6, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: SWEETHEART CUP COMPANY INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:FORT HOWARD CUP CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005346/0001
Effective date: 19891129
Feb 13, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, AS COLLATERAL AGENT
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORT HOWARD CUP CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005287/0404
Effective date: 19891114
Owner name: FORT HOWARD CUP CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:LILY-TULIP, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005300/0320
Effective date: 19861231
Owner name: LILY-TULIP, INC., A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:SWEETHEART HOLDING CORP.;REEL/FRAME:005284/0457
Owner name: MARYLAND CUP CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:MARYLAND CUP CORPORATION, A CORP. OF MD (MERGED INTO) MC ACQUISITION CORP., A CORP.OF MD (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:005284/0423
Effective date: 19830831
Owner name: SWEETHEART HOLDING CORP.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:MARYLAND CUP CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005284/0418
Effective date: 19841231