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Publication numberUS3602872 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1971
Filing dateFeb 11, 1969
Priority dateFeb 11, 1969
Publication numberUS 3602872 A, US 3602872A, US-A-3602872, US3602872 A, US3602872A
InventorsBraunstein Harry R
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector for tapping shielded high voltage cable
US 3602872 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] inventor Harry R. Bnumtein Sharpsville, Pa. [21 Appl. No. 798,294 [22] Filed Feb. 11, 1969 [45] Patented Aug 31, 1971 [73] Assignee Westinghouse Electric Corporation Pittsburgh, Pa.

[54] ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR TAPPING SHIELDED HIGH VOLTAGE CABLE 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. 339/97 R, 174/71 C, 337/189, 337/201, 339/147 R [51] Int. Cl. H0lh 85/54, HOlr 11/20, H02q 9/06 [50] Field of Search 339/95-99, 147 P, 138,141, 59-61, 218; 174/71 C; 337/187-189, 201

[56] Relerenoes Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,173,099 2/1916 Davis 339/98 UX 2,196,9641 4/1940 Lee 339/97 2,534,786 12/1950 McElhaney et a1. 339/97 P 2,694,183 11/1954 Elden et a1 339/97 P X 2,805,399 9/1957 Leeper 339/97 P UX 3,320,385 5/1967 Sherwood 337/187 states I I 3,377,610 4/1968 Busch et al. 339/147 P 3,380,014 4/1968 Schenker et al. 339/97 3,457,428 7/1969 339/97 X 3,461,419 8/1969 339/97 X 3,466,593 9/1969 339/61 X 2,144,139 1/1939 337/201 X 3,512,118 5/1970 337/201 UX 3,513,425 5/1970 337/201 Primary Examiner-Ian A. Calvert Attorneys--A. T. Stratton, F. E. Browder and Donald R.

Lackey ABSTRACT: An electrical connector having first and second sections which are urged into assembled relation about a shielded cable to be tapped. A sharp metallic spike in one of the sections pierces the cable insulation and contacts the cable conductor at a point where the cable has been prepared by I removing a longitudinal section of its ground shield. The first and second sections each have a metallic shell which cooperates to tenninate the cable shield with stress cone-type terminations, and each have a resilient solid insulation which PATENIED was] |97l SHEET 2 BF 3 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR FOR TAPPING SHIELDED HIGH VOLTAGE CABLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention relates in general to electrical connectors, and more specifically to connectors for tapping shielded high voltage cable.

2. Description of the Prior Art The primary and secondary distribution systems of electrical utilities have been primarily of overhead-type construction, with the most common circuit arrangement being the radial system. The use of underground distribution of electrical power has been increasing in recent years due to the increasing number of new subdivisions resorting to underground distribution for estlietic reasons. Underground residential distribution systems are inherently more costly than distribution systems of the overhead-type, and their cost is further increased because they utilize the loop system instead of the radial system, as the radial system is not reliable enough for underground distribution systems. The cost of the loop system is further increased by the trend in residential distribution systems toward providing a small distribution transformer for each-house, located adjacent the house. The underground shielded cable is buried near the curb line and then loops into each of the distribution transformers, crossing the front yard of each residential user twice. This arrangement requires two high voltage splices and two stress cones at each transformer, two high voltage bushings on each transformer, and two runs of high voltage shielded cable between the street and location of the transformer adjacent the house.

The costof the underground distribution system could be substantially reduced by using a loop-radial arrangement,

wherein the primary circuit loops through a subdivision of houses along the curb line, with laterals or radials being tapped off the loop for each transformer. Thus, only one run of high voltage shielded, cable is required between the loop system and the distribution transformer, and distribution transformers with a single high voltage bushing may be utilized. The success of this arrangement, however, depends upon providing a low cost connector for tapping the radial feeders into the loop cable, quickly and efficiently while making a moistureproof, low stress connection. I

Underground residential distribution systems which utilize a distribution transformer per house, located at the house, also present the problem of protecting the loop system against faults in the connected high voltage cable and transformers.

For example, there is nothing tov protect the loop system against faults in the connected high voltage cable due to digins which may occur in the front yard of a residential user. Thus, in addition to providing a low cost connector for tapping a radial feeder into a shielded cable which is part of a loop feed system, it would also be desirable to provide some means for protecting the loop system from faults in the high voltage radial feeder cable and distribution transformers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly, the invention is a new and improved electrical connector for tapping shielded high voltage cable, with the con nector including a metallic housing, separable along a line parallel with the longitudinal axis of the cable, to provide two sections which are assembled about the cable to be tapped. The cable to be tapped is prepared by removing a short longitudinal length of its outer shield. One of the sections of the metallic housing includes a sharp metallic spike, secured within the housing section and insulated therefrom by rigid solid insulation. When the two sections of the housing are urged into assembled relation by clamps disposed about the section, the spike pierces the cable insulation where the shield I has been removed, and makescontact with the cable conducfor.

A resilient, elastomeric solid insulation system is disposed in both sections of thehousing, which makes air and moisture exeluding contact with the cable. The metallic housing contacts the cable shield on the cable where the cable enters the housing, and the housing then flares outwardly to provide stress cone-type terminations for the cable shield.

The spike may be connected directly to the conductor portion of another shielded cable, which has its groundshield terminated in a stress cone formed integral with the metallic housing of the connector; or, the spike may be connected to protective fuse apparatus disposed on the metallic housing, which in turn is adapted for connection to one or more shielded cables. The latter embodiment protects the loop feeder system from faults in the high voltage cable and the load circuit, such as in the distribution transformer,

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Further advantages and uses of the invention-will become more apparent when considered in view of the following detailed description and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, in section, of an electrical connector constructed according to a first embodiment of the invention; l

FIG. 2 is an exploded, perspective view of the connector shown in FIG. 1, which more clearly illustrates the assembly of the connector to a shielded electrical cable; and

FIG. 3 is an elevational view, partially in section, of a connector constructed according to another embodiment of the invention, which includes protective fuse apparatus.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, and FIG, 1 in particular, thereis illustrated an elevational view of a connector 10, partially in section, constructed according to a first embodiment of the invention in which a shielded cable I1 is connected toa shielded cable 20. Cable 20 is the cable to be tapp'ed,'and shielded cable 11 may be a radial feed for a distribution transformer located at a house. FIG. 2 will also be referred to in describing connector 10, with FIG. 2 illustrating connector 10 in an exploded perspective view.

More specifically, connector 10 includes a metallic housing 12 formed of any good electrical conductor, such as copper, with housing 12 being separable into first and second housing portions 14 and 16, respectively, along a plane which includes edge 18 and the longitudinal axis of the shielded cable 20. Housing I2 includes first, second and third stress cones 22, 24 and 26, for terminating the cable ground shields of cables II and 20. Stress cone 22 is disposed entirely in the first housing portion 14, and stress cones 24 and 26 are formed of both the first and second housing portions 14 and 16, when the housing portions are in assembled relation.

Stress cone 22 includes a cylindrical, tubular projection 28 sized to snugly receive shielded cable 11, and a smoothly flared portion 30 which starts at the end of the tubular projection 28 and flares outwardly therefrom. The flared portion 30 terminates in a cylindrical portion 32, which in turn is connected to the main body 34 of the first housing portion 14. The main body 34 of housing portion 14, along with the main body 36 of the second housing portion 16, form a tubular, cylindrical shell concentric with cable 20, when connector 10 is assembled about cable 20.

Stress cone 24 includes a cylindrical, tubular projection 38 and a flared portion 40, with both the cylindrical projection 38 and the flared portion 40 being formed of portions from the first and second housing portions 14 and 16, respectively, when they are in assembled relation. in like manner, stress cone 26 includes a cylindrical, tubular projection 42, and a flared portion 44, both of which are formed from the first and second housing portions 14 and 16. The flared portions 40 and 44 of stress cones 24 and 26, respectively, terminate at the main body portions 34 and 36 of the first and second housing portions 14 and 16, respectively.

The first housing portion 14 is constructed by striping the shielded cable ll of its outer jacket and ground shield for a predetermined longitudinal distance at one of its ends, to expose the insulation 46, and by removing a short length of the insulation 46 to expose a length of bare conductor 48 at the terminus or extreme end of cable 11. A metallic spike or member 50 having means 51 for fastening the spike 50 to conductor 48 at one end, and a sharp point 52 at the other end, is mechanically fastened to the bare conductor 48. Conductor 48 may be inserted into a recess disposed in means 51, and secured thereto by crimping, soldering, brazing, or any other suitable fastening means.

The prepared end of cable 11 is inserted into the tubular projection 28 of stress cone 22, and advanced until the tip of the sharpened end 52 reaches the imaginary plane which includes the edges of the first housing portion 14 which mate with the edges of the second housing portion 16. The ground shield of cable 11 should extend into the tubular projection 28 for a short distance, and clamping means 54 is disposed about the tubular projection and tightened to provide a good electrical joint between the grounded shield of cable 11 and the metallic first housing portion 14. The tubular projection 28 of stress cone 22 may be longitudinally slotted to allow the clamping means 54 to urge the cylindrical tubular projection 28 into the desired tight contact with the cable 11.

The spike 50 is rigidly held within the first housing portion 14, and insulated therefrom, by cast solid insulation 60. The first housing portion 14 is used as the mold, with the insulation system 60 being introduced while liquid, to surround the insulation 46 and conductor 48 of cable 11, and a predetermined portion of spike 50. The insulation is then cured to a rigid solid while the spike is located and held concentrically within the stress cone 22. For example, the insulation may reach the point where the cylindrical portion 32 intersects the main body 34 of the first housing portion 14. The cast solid insulation 60 may be any suitable resinous insulation system which cures to a hard, rigid solid, and which possesses good electrical insulating qualities, such as a filled, or unfilled epoxy resin system.

The first housing portion 14 is completed by filling the remainder of its main body portion 34 with a resilient solid or elastomeric insulation system 62. The resilient insulation system 62 also extends into the flange portions 40 and 44 of the stress cones 24 and 26, terminating at the start of the tubular projections 38 and 42 of the stress cones. The resilient insulation 62 has an exposed surface which falls on a plane which passes through the edges of the first housing portion 14 which mate with similar edges of the second housing portion 16, with a semicircular, longitudinal depression being disposed in the exposed surface of insulation 62, which is sized to snugly receive the shielded cable 20. The tapered or sharpened end 52 of the spike 50 extends outwardly from the resilient insulation 62, into the depression formed in the exposed surface of this invention.

The resilient insulation 62 should be formed of a material having good electrical insulating qualities, and good ozone and oil resistance. Further, it should form a tight, moistureproof bond when insulating members of the same material are pressed together. A material which has been found to possess all of these desired characteristics is polyurethane rubber, although other moldable or castable resilient insulating materials may be used. Polyurethane rubber is particularly well suited for the application because it possesses an excellent memory" when stressed, always trying to return to its original configuration, and it is highly self adhesive, forming an air tight, moistureproof bond between two members of the material when pressed together.

The second housing portion 16 includes a solid backup" block or member 64. which is preferably formed of a rigid solid insulating material, such as polytetrafluoroethylene or polyoxymethylene, and resilient solid insulation 66. Block 64 includes a semicircular depression 68, and is fixed within the second housing portion 16 with the depression 68 aligned with the cylindrical portions 38 and 42. Block 64 is located longitudinally within the second housing section such that the sharp end 52 of spike 50 is directed to approximately the midpoint of its depression 68 when the first and second housing portions 14 and 16 are in assembled relation.

Resilient solid insulation system 66 is preferably formed of the same material as the resilient solid insulation system 62 hereinbefore described, and it is disposed within the main body 36 of the second housing portion 16, and into the flared portions 40 and 44 of the stress cones 24 and 26, respectively. The insulation 66 has an exposed surface which lies on a plane which passes through the edges of the second housing portion 16 which mate with similar edges on the first housing portion 14, and similar to the surface of resilient insulation 62, resilient insulation 66 includes a semicircular longitudinal depression 70 sized to snugly receive the diameter of cable 20.

To connect the conductor 48 of cable 11 to the conductor 21 of cable 20, the cable 20 is first prepared by removing a predetermined longitudinal dimension of its outer jacket and ground shield, to expose the cable insulation 72. The predetermined length removed is substantially equal to the longitudinal dimension of the resilient insulation 62, i.e., the longitudinal dimension of the semicircular depression is the resilient insulation. The second housing portion 16 of connector 10 is placed under the prepared cable 20, with the exposed insulation 72 of the cable being disposed in the semicircular depression 70 in the resilient solid insulation 66, and in the semicircular depression 68 in the backup block member 64. The first housing section 14 is then placed adjacent cable 20, with its ends being longitudinally aligned with the ends of the second housing portion 16, and with the pointed end 52 of the spike 50 being disposed against the outer surface of the cable insulation 72. Clamping means and 82 are then disposed about the cylindrical tubular portions 38 and 42 of stress cones 24 and 26, respectively, with the clamping means 80 and 82 being of the type which, when actuated, will urge the first and second housing portions into assembled relation, such as by turning a screw, which causes the sharp end 52 of the spike 50 to pierce the cable insulation 72 and come into electrical contact with conductor 21 of cable 20. The solid resilient insulation 62 and 66 will be squeezed snugly about cable 20, and the tight interface between the resilient insulation 62 and 64 will force out air and form a moistureproofjoint. Clamping means 80 and 82 also urge the tubular portions 38 and 42 into tight contact with the ground shield on cable 20, terminating the cable shield with stress cones 24 and 26, house is enabling the metallic housing 12 to carry the ground return current.

Connector 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, thus enables a quick, reliable connection to be made to the high voltage shielded electrical cable, with the connection being made without requiring operating personnel to cut the cable insulation. Further, the connector terminates the cable shield with stress cones, eliminating the costly hand-built stress cones normally used, it provides an environmental seal while making the splice or connection, and it simplifies and reduces the labor content required in making in-the-field splices. Thus, connector 10 enables a loop feed cable to be placed along the curb line of a subdivision and, when a house is built, the radial feeder to the distribution transformer may be quickly and inexpensively connected to the loop cable. The radial feeder, tapped from the loop feed cable, thus requires only one shielded cable between the loop feed cable and the distribution transformer, and the transformer requires only one high voltage bushing. Since connector 10 forms an environmental seal about the electrical connection, the connector 10 may be buried in the ground after it makes the splice between cables 20 and 11.

FIG. 3 is an elevational view, partially in section, of a connector constructed according to another embodiment of the invention. Connector 100 is similar to connector 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, having a metallic housing 102 separable into first and second housing portions 104 and 106, respectively, which are assembled about a shielded cable 120, tapping the cable with a metallic spike when the first and second housing portions are urged into assembled relation by clamping means 180 and 182. The first and second housing portions 104 and 106, when assembled, provide stress cones 124 and 126 for terminating the ground shield of cable 120, with the metallic housing 102 providing a conductive path for the ground return current. The first housing portion 104 includes rigid, solid insulating means 160 for holding spike 150 in the desired location within the first housing portion 104, and both the first and second housing portions 104 and 106 include resilient solid insulating means (not shown) which contact one another and the shielded cable 120, when the first and second housing portions are assembled about cable 120 and clamped.

Instead of connecting the spike 150 to the conductor of another shielded cable, however, as disclosed in FIGS. 1 and 2, in this embodiment of the invention spike 150 is connected to protective fuse apparatus 200. Protective fuse apparatus 200 protects the cable 120, and the electrical system of which it is a part, from faults in the radial feeder and the loads connected to it.

More specifically, protective fuse apparatus 200 has two major parts, a receptacle or holder 201 and a removable fusible portion 203. The receptacle portion 201 includes a tubular outer member 202 which is mounted on the metallic housing 102, such as by snugly telescoping one of the open ends of the tubular outer member 202 over a suitably dimensioned projection- 204 of housing 102, and fastening the two parts together, such as with a high strength adhesive. The tubular outer, member 202 and projection 204 of housing 102 may have acircular, square, or rectangular cross-sectional configuration,'as desired. As illustrated, the outer member 202 may be formed of an insulating material, such as a moisture resistant laminated plastic. However, it may be metallic, if desired.

A second or inner tubular member 206, formed of an insulating material, is disposed concentrically within the outer tubular member 202, which has one or more contact assemblies disposed at a similar longitudinal location, such as contact assemblies 210 and 216, which are disposed to urge electrical contacts 212 and 217, respectively, through apertures in the sidewall of the inner tubular member 206. A contact assembly 208 is longitudinally spaced from contact assemblies 210 and Additional contact assemblies may be disposed at the same longitudinal location as contact assemblies 210 and 216, but circumferentially spaced therefrom. The number of contact assemblies disposed at the location of contact assemblies 210 and 216 depends upon the number of radial feeders to be con nected to shielded cable 120 via the protective fuse apparatus 200. The space between the inner andouter tubular members 202 and 206 is filled with solid insulation 220, such as a polyurethane foam, or any other suitable insulation.

Since contact assemblies 210 and 216 are similar in construction, only one of the contact assemblies, such as contact assembly 210 will be described in detail. Contact assembly 210 includes a body portion or housing 234, which may be formed in two half sections of an insulating material, such as a glass polyester, or a conductive material which would provide a smooth equipotential surface about the contact parts. mayalso be used. When the two half sections are assembled they form a central bore or opening for slidably receiving the electrical contact member 212. Housing 234 may be divided into first and second contact portion disposed in the first chamber and'a connecting shaft portion which extends into the second chamber.'A spring 236, which may be formed of any suitable material, such as stainless steel, is disposed about the shaft portion of the contact in the first chamber, which urges the electrical contact member 212 into the aperture in the side wall portion of the inner tubular member 206. A flange may extend radially outward from the shaft of contact 212, with the flange being in the second chamber. The flange prevents contact member 212 from traveling too far into the aperture when the fusible portion of the protective fuse apparatus is not in its assembled position. An electrical lead or conductor 233 enters the housing 234, via the second chamber, where it is brazed orotherwise suitably secured to the shaft portion of electrical contact 214.

The housing 234 for enclosing the metallic contact 212 has a diameter which snugly fits the aperture in the inner tubular member 206, and it may be secured in this position by a flange which extends outwardly therefrom which is fastened to the inner tubular member 206 by any suitable fastening means such as a hose-type clamp (not shown). The contacts of the protective fuse apparatus 200 which are adapted for connection to the radial feeder circuits, such as the contact assem blies 210 and 216, may be connected to plug-in type high voltage bushing assemblies 224 and 226, respectively, as shown in FIG. 3, or they may each be connected directly to the conductor of a shielded cable, similar to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. If plug-in type bushings are used, the shielded cable, such as cables 255 and 256, of each radial feeder circuit is connected to a female portion of a connector, such as connector portions 230 and 232.

The cable ground shields of cables 255 and 256 may be connected to the cable ground shield of cable via a metallic ring 300, which is disposed about the insulating tube 202. Metallic ring 300 may have a plurality of metallic tabs, such as tabs 302 and 304, welded or brazed thereto, to which the shields 306 and 308 of cable 120, and shields 310 and 312 of cables 255 and 256, may be fastened, such as by brazing or bolting.

If the outer tube 202 were to be constructed of metal, it could be electrically connected to the metallic housing 102 of connector 100. In this instance, the cable shields of cables 255 and 256 may be connected to tube 202, and thus to the shield of cable 120, via conductive coatings disposed on plug-in bushing assemblies 224 and 226, which coatings contact the ground shields of cables 255 and 256 when their associated connector portions 230 and 232, respectively, are' plugged into the bushings. In this embodiment, metallic ring 300 could be eliminated.

Contact assembly 208 is illustrated as including a springgrip pressure terminal 209, which is mounted through the end of tubular member 206, and connected to spike member via electrical conductor 222. Electrical conductor 222 may be brazed to terminal 209 and spike member 150, or fastened thereto by any other suitable means. The spring grip terminal cooperates with a depending electrically conductive member 211 on the removable portion 203 of the protective fuse apparatus 200. Contact assembly 208 may be of any other suitable construction, for example, it may be similar to contact assemblies 210 and 216, if desired.

The removably portion 203 of the protective fuse apparatus 200 includes a fusible link or fuse member 204 having a tubular insulating body portion 246, formed of fiber or other suitable insulating and are quenching material. Fuse 240, which is preferably a current limiting fuse, has spaced electrodes 242 and 244 separated by the tubular insulating body portion 246, which electrodes are interconnected by a fusible element (not shown) disposed through the opening in the tubular body portion 246. When the removably portion 203 is in assembled relation with the receptacle 201, the first and second electrodes 242 and 244 make electrical contact with the contact members of the various contact assemblies, such as contact assemblies 216, 210 and 208. Electrode 242 may include an outwardly extending tang having an opening therein, for fastening the fusible member 240 to an insulating rod member 250 with a bolt, or other suitable fastening means. Electrode 244 may have a depending threaded stud to which conductive member 211 is secured.

Insulating rod member 250 has a handle and sealing means 260 disposed at its other end. The handle and sealing means may have an expandable-type stopper 262 operable by a cam type operating arm and handle assembly 264, as illustrated, or any other suitable handle and sealingmeans may be used, such as by threadably engaging the removable portion 203 with the receptacle 201, and forming a shaft seal with an elastomeric ring and gasket member. When the removable portion 203 is disposed in the receptacle 201, the fuse member 240 will bridge the longitudinally spaced contacts and connect the shielded cable 120 to the remotely located distribution transformers connected to cables 255 and 256.

When the removable portion 203 is inserted into the receptacle 201 and the flange or shoulder 270 of the handle and sealing means 260 is properly seated against the top portion 258 of the receptacle, the cam and operating arm assembly may be turned to expand the stopper 262 and provide an environmental seal.

The shielded cables of the radial feeders may be directly connected to the load side of the fuse 240, instead of being plugged in. In either event, connector 100 may be directly buried in the ground, after the connection to the cable 120 has been made. The outer tubular member 202 may be extended upwardly to grade level and fitted with a suitable lockable cover. Or, if desired, connector 100 may be disposed in a subterranean vault.

Connector 100 protects the loop feed cable 120 from faults in the radial feed cables, such as those due to a dig-in in the front yard of the residential user, and against faults in the remotely located distribution transformers. Further, it allowsmore than one radial feeder to be connected to the loop feed and its associated distribution transformer to be selectively isolated from the energized loop feeder. It allows a high voltage connection connection to be made without hand-built stress cones. Still further, by using a current limiting fuse, the connector 100 is safe for operating personnel, as the current will be limited to a predetermined maximum, even if the fuse is inserted when there is a low impedance fault in one of the radial circuits. Connector 100 may be manufactured for a relatively low cost, and may be quickly and easily connected to shielded cable by field operating personnel. Thus, when a new subdivision of homes is being built, it will only be necessary to lay the loop feed cable along the curb line. The high voltage tap-ins to the loop feed cable may be made at the time a house is being built. This eliminates looping the cable into empty lots at the time the loop feed cable in installed, eliminating the danger to the electrical distribution system, and to construction workers, due to the digging of gas and water lines as well as the foundations of the houses.

In summary, there has been disclosed new and improved connectors for quickly and efficiently making a high voltage connection to a shieldedcable. The connectors are inexpensive, and easy to install, making it economically attractive to provide an underground loop feed with a plurality of radial feeders connected thereto, which are connected to remotely located distribution transformers. The connectors are installed without requiring the operating personnel to cut the high voltage cable, and they provide a low stress termination for the cable ground shield. The high voltage connection is provided with an environmental seal, allowing it to be buried in the earth, and in one embodiment of the invention fused protection apparatus is provided, which is also sealed against moisture, and which also. may be buried in the earth. The protective apparatus provides a remote fusing station which protects the loop feed against faults in the radials, and allows the radial feeder systems to be quickly isolated.

Since numerous changes may be made in the above described apparatus and different embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the spirit thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the foregoing description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative, and not in a limiting sense.

I claim as my invention:

1. A connector for making an electrical connection to an insulated and shielded electrical cable, comprising:

a metallic housing having first and second ends, said metallic housing being separable into first and second sections, first and second insulating means disposed in the first and second sections, respectively, of said metallic housing.

with said first and second insulatin means each defining a portion of a wall of an aperture w ich extends between the first and second ends of said housing,

a first electrical conductor disposed in the first section of said housing, having a first end which extends into the aperture defined by said first and second insulating means, and a second end adapted for connection to an external electrical circuit, the first end of said electrical conductor being pointed,

clamping means disposed to urge the first and second sections of said metallic housing into assembled relation when an electrical cable is disposed in the aperture, to pierce the electrical cable with the pointed end of said electrical conductor and contact the cable conductor, while bringing the first and second insulating means into air and moisture excluding contact with the cable,

a fuse receptacle mounted on the first section of said metallic housing, said fuse receptacle having a first contact connected to the second end of said first electrical conductor, and a plurality of second contacts spaced from said first contact, said plurality of second contacts being adapted for connection to external electrical circuits,

and a removable fuse assembly including a fuse member disposed to electrically connect the first contact of said fuse receptacle to the plurality of second contacts.

2. The connector of claim 1 wherein the first and second insulating means are resilient solid insulating systems.

3. The connector of claim 1 wherein the first and second ends of the metallic housing are adapted to contact the cable shield, with the proportions of the housing adjacent the first and second ends flaring radially outward to provide stress cone terminations for the cable shield.

43. The connector of claim 1 including a plurality of plug-in terminals disposed on the fuse receptacle, each having a conductor connected to a different second contact of the fuse receptacle, said plurality of plug-in terminals being adapted to cooperate with plug-in devices from external electrical circuits.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3697932 *Mar 29, 1971Oct 10, 1972Westinghouse Electric CorpElectrical connector
US3848955 *Aug 9, 1973Nov 19, 1974Westinghouse Electric CorpElectrical connector for tapping a concentric electrical cable
US4266842 *Sep 17, 1979May 12, 1981Zerox CorporationTransmission line active coaxial tap
US4469391 *Oct 13, 1981Sep 4, 1984Thomas & Betts CorporationCoaxial cable connector
US4738009 *Jul 2, 1986Apr 19, 1988Lrc Electronics, Inc.Coaxial cable tap
US4749367 *May 22, 1987Jun 7, 1988Fraser Ward MVulcan tap
US4842524 *Nov 3, 1987Jun 27, 1989Hopkins Manufacturing CorporationTrailer light connection systems
US5484306 *Oct 20, 1994Jan 16, 1996Interconnect Devices Inc.Quick-connect terminal and receptacle
US6312281 *Jan 8, 2001Nov 6, 2001Andrew CorporationTap connector
US6568952 *Aug 2, 2001May 27, 2003Swenco Products, Inc.T-tap connector
US6660939Dec 3, 2002Dec 9, 2003Andrew CorporationMethod and apparatus for shield slot signal coupler
US6664474Aug 30, 2002Dec 16, 2003Andrew CorporationShield slot tap
US6683254Sep 30, 2002Jan 27, 2004Andrew Corp.Low loss cable coupler
US6851966 *May 22, 2003Feb 8, 2005Swenco Products, Inc.T-tap connector
US8512077 *Mar 2, 2010Aug 20, 2013Taihan Electric Wire Co., Ltd.Joint box for connecting high voltage cables
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/425, 174/71.00C, 337/201, 439/620.21, 337/189
International ClassificationH01R4/24, H02G15/12, H02G15/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2404, H02G15/12
European ClassificationH02G15/12, H01R4/24A