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Publication numberUS3603171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1971
Filing dateNov 12, 1968
Priority dateNov 12, 1968
Publication numberUS 3603171 A, US 3603171A, US-A-3603171, US3603171 A, US3603171A
InventorsDodge Harry G
Original AssigneeCrawford Fitting Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crank
US 3603171 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Harry G. Dodge Painesville, Ohio [21 Appl. No. 775,021 [22] Filed Nov. 12, 1968 [45] Patented Sept. 7, 1971 [73] Assignee Crawford Fitting Company Solon, Ohio {54] CRANK 15 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

52 0.5. CI 74/548 [51} Int. Cl 605g 1/00 [501 Field of Search 74/545, 546, 547,548,112

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,343,531 6/1920 Tennyson 74/548 2,156,200 4/1939 Smyers 74/548 Primary Examiner-William F. O'Dea Assistant ExaminerWesley S. Ratliff, Jr. Att0rneyFay, Sharpe and Mulholland ABSTRACT: Disclosed is a driving device for imparting rotary t motion to a driven member, said driving device comprising a body supporting a rotatable cylinder at one end thereof. The other end of the body includes a rotatable handle extending from the body along an axis parallel to the axis of the rotatable cylinder. An internal passageway is provided in the body in which a reciprocable pin member is disposed. The end of the pin member adjacent the rotatable cylinder is provided with teeth adapted to enter recesses defined in the external surface of the cylinder so as to lock the cylinder against rotation relative to the body when the pin is in a first position. A camming piston is reciprocably supported in the body adjacent the handle. The axisof the camming piston is parallel to the axis of the handle. A pivotal lever is carried by the handle and is provided with a cam ring adapted to abut the camming piston. Pivotal movement of the lever produces reciprocable movement of the camming piston which abuts the reciprocable pin to produce movement of the pin thereby locking the cylinder against rotation relative to the body. Spring means are provided in the linkage normally to bias the teeth out of engagement with the recesses so that the cylinder is normally rotatable in the absence of actuation of the handle lever.

PATENTED SEP 7 1971 SHEET 1 OF 2 FIG.2

INVENTOR. HARRY G. DODGE BY if d r/ n ATTORNEYS.

CRANK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a driving device for imparting rotary motion to a driven member. While the invention is broadly applicable as a tool for imparting rotary motion to machine elements such as shafts, screws, bolts, and other similar elements, the preferred embodiment of this invention will be described with reference to a tube bender and in particular with reference to a crank for rotating the forming roll or mandrel of a tube bender.

Hand operated tube bending tools are well known to the art. As an example of such a tool, reference is made to U.S. Pat. No. 3,236,082 to Beck et al. As shown in the Beck et al. patent, a squared crank arm which carries a hand grasp roller at its outer end is nonrotatably received in a recess of a stub shaft to which is secured a bevel gear. Rotation of the crank arm about the stub shaft axis produces rotation of the bevel gear thereby imparting rotation to a forming roll of the tube bender. Because the crank arm is nonrotatably secured to the gear train which produces rotation of the forming roll, any rotation of the crank arm will produce a corresponding rotation of the forming roll. Inversely, any rotation of the forming roll will produce a rotation of the crank arm. This fixed relationship of the crank arm and the forming roll can be a hindrance to the operator of the tube bending tool. Generally, when not cranking, the operator of a tube bending tool desires that the crank arm be disposed in a downward position for a number of reasons. When tubing is installed in the tube bending tool or removed therefrom, the operator frequently desires to rotate the forming roll manually to orient the roll with respect to the tube. With a tube-bending tool such as is shown in the Beck et al. patent, a manual rotation of the forming roll will produce a rotation of the crank arm which rotation tends to interfere with the operator. Further, the weight of the crank arm renders manual manipulation of the fonning roll more difficult.

The driving device of this invention, when used as a crank arm for a tube-bending tool, provides a releasble connection between the crank arm and the forming roll permitting independent rotation of the forming roll without rotation of the crank arm. Further, the crank arm of this invention, under the influence of gravity, is normally in a downward position when assembled to the tube-bending tool thereby to avoid interference with the operator.

For a more complete description of the driving device of this invention, reference is now made to the accompanying figures in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, partly in section, of a tube bending tool incorporating the driving device of this invention as a crank arm thereof;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 2 2 of FIG. 1;

FIG 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the upper portion of FIG. 2 showing the rotatable cylinder of this invention in greater detail;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIG.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 55 of FIG.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged sectional view of the bottommost portion of FIG. 5 and showing in greater detail the handle grip of this invention;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 77 of FIG. 5. Description of the Invention Reference is now made to FIG. 1 wherein there is shown a tube-bending tool in which the driving device of this invention is utilized as a crank arm. The tube bending tool is comprised of a base 11 and a coverplate 12 which is secured to the base by means of cap screws (not shown) or the like. The base 11 has depending from its bottom, centrally thereof, a block 14 with flat faces 15 to which may be applied the jaws of a vice (not shown) for holding the tool on a bench or preferably, on a single column to provide space for compound angle bending. The base member 11 and coverplate 12 provide an annular space 16'for housing the bevel gears 17 and 18. The gear 17 is fixed to the inner end of a stub shaft or crank shaft 19 by means of a key 20. Alternately, the gear 17 may be fixed to the stub shaft by means of a pin. The shaft 19 is journaled in the sidewall of the base member as best shown in FIG. 1; its outer end is provided with a hex surface 21 (FIG. 2) for receiving the free end of a crank arm 22.

Gear 18 is rotatably supported by the stub shaft 23 which has its lower end journaled in the bottom of the base as indicated at 24'. The hub of gear 18 is fixed to the shaft 23 by means of a pin (not shown) such that rotation of the stub shaft 23 will be transmitted to gear 18 and vice versa. The hub of gear 18 is journaled in'the coverplate 12, as indicated at 27, to provide support for the gear.

The shaft 23 extends above the coverplate 12 and the forming roll 28 is fixed thereon by means of a spline or key (not shown). The outer end of the stub shaft 23 includes a hex surface 29 similar to the hex surface 21 of the crank shaft 19. In the event that it is inconvenient to turn the gear 17 by means of the crankshaft 19, the crank arm 22 may be removed from the crankshaft 19 and positioned on the stub shaft 23 at the hex surface 29.

The forming roll 28includes an annular groove 30 for the purpose of receiving a tube 31. As is shown in FIG. 1, tube 31 is supported within the forming roll groove 30 by means of a tube clamp 32 including a handle portion 33 and a V-shaped supporting surface 34.

In a tube-bending operation, the tube is first clamped into position in the groove 30 of the forming roll 28. The crank arm 22 is then rotated, rotating bevel gear 17 and bevel gear 18. Because bevel gear 18 is nonrotatably secured to stub shaft 23, rotation of bevel gear 18 produces rotation of the forming roll 28. A bending force is thus imparted to the tube 31. For a more complete description of the operation of a tube bending tool, reference is made to beck et al. U.S. Pat. No. 3,236,082. This invention is directed to the driving device or crank arm 22 for imparting rotary motion to the crankshaft 19 or, alternately, to the stub shaft 23 by means of the hex surface 29.

As is more clearly shown in FIG. 2, the driving device of this invention comprises a body 35 having a bore 36 and counterbores 37, 38 and 39. Rotatably supported at one end of body 35 is a cylinder 40 having a plurality of teeth 41 in the external surface thereof. Teeth 41 define a plurality of recesses 42 for a purpose to be described more fully hereafter. A passageway extends through the cylinder 40, the walls of said cylinder defining said passageway being generally hex-shaped and complementary to the hex-shaped external surface of the crankshaft 19. Thus, when crankshaft 19 is received within the passageway of the cylinder 40, the cylinder and the crank shaft 19 are nonrotatably secured to one another.

This invention should not be considered limited to the hexshaped construction of the crankshaft l9 and the internal walls of the rotatable cylinder 40, as other structures well known to those skilled in the art may be used to secure the crankshaft 19 to the cylinder 40 in a nonrotatable relationship.

Slidably received within the counterbore 37 of the body 35 is a cylindrical pin or shaft 43. Pin 43 includes a cylindrical projection 44 slidably disposed in bore 36. A compression spring 45 is disposed about the cylindrical projection 44 so as to abut the end shoulder of pin 43 and the radial wall of body 35 defining the counterbore 37. The purpose of the compression spring 45 will be described more fully hereafter. The end of the cylindrical projection 44 is threaded at 46 for reception in a tapped hole of carrier 47. Pivoted on tube carrier 47 by means of pin 48 is a pawl 49 including teeth 50 thereon. As shown in FIG. 2., teeth 50 are adapted to be received within recesses 42 of cylinder 40. Pin 48 permits pawl 49 to pivot slightly about the pin axis as the pawl engages cylinder 40.

This invention should not be considered as limited to the pawl construction of FIG. 2 as it is contemplated that the teeth 50 may be provided directly on the end surface of the carrier 47 or, alternately, the teeth 50 should be provided directly on an enlarged head of the cylindrical projection 44. The construction of FIG. 2 permits a certain degree of flexibility in the pawl 49 providing unrestrained movement of teeth 50 into recesses 42 in virtually any orientation of cylinder 40. The threaded interconnection of the cylindrical projection 44 and the carrier 47 aids in the assembly of the driving device of this invention as will be described more fully hereafter.

As is shown in FIG. 5, the cylinder 40 is free to rotate within a first end of the body 35, while being retained against axial displacement by means of a snap ring 51 and a coverplate 52 (FIGS. 4 and Coverplate 52 also permits access to the pawl 49, pin 48, and carrier 47. The coverplate may be secured to the body 35 by any suitable fastening means such as screws extending through the coverplate and threaded into the tapped.

holes 53 in the body 35 (FIG. 3).

As has been previously pointed out, the cylindrical pin 43 is slidably received within the counterbore 37 of the body 35. As seen in FIG. 5, the cylindrical pin 43 extends into a second-end portion of the body 35 where said pin abuts a camming piston 54. Camming piston 54 includes a generally cylindrical external surface 55 slidably received within a counterbore 56 of body 35. A cylindrical shoulder 57 of lesser diameter than the cylindrical surface 55 is defined at one end of the camming piston. A generally frustoconical camming surface 58 is disposed between shoulder 57' and cylindrical surface 55. Camming piston 54 further includes a bore 59 and a counterbore 60 which receives a compression spring 61. As is shown in FIG. 5, camming piston 54 is slidably received in counterwith respect to piston 54. While rotating, however, nose 74 may still actuate piston 54.

bore56 of body 35. A cylindrical connector element 62 is I disposed within the bore 59 of the camming piston. Cylindrical connector element 62 includes a flange or shoulder 63 fixed thereto. Shoulder 63 is adapted to abut an internal radial wall surface of body when an end of the connector element is disposed within a bore 64 of body 35. A washer 65'is received in a counterborc of the body 35. Screw 64a is threadedly received in a tapped hole at one end of the connector element 62 and in cooperation with washer 65 permits connector element 62 to rotate with respect to body 35 while disposed in bore 64. A compression spring 61 is disposed within counterbore 60 of the camming piston 54 and is adapted to abut shoulder 63 and a radial wall of camming piston 54 defining the counterbore 60. The purpose of spring 61 will be described more fully hereafter.

Attached to the body 35 by means of the connector element 62 and screw 67 is a handle grip 66. Handle grip 66 comprises a generally cylindrical element 68 including a laterally opening slot or recess 69 which receives a pivotal lever 70. As is shown in FIG. 5, element 68 may include an internal flat portion 71 at the bottom of recess 69, and which serves as an anchoring surface for one end of connector element 62. A

washer '72 is interposed between the element 68 and the body 35 to reduce friction between the opposed relatively rotatable surfaces of handle grip 66 and crank body 35.

It will be seen from FIG. 5 that handle grip 66 including element 68, lever 70 and connector 62 is free to rotate with respect to body 35 about the axis of connector 62. Thus, the operator may grip the element 68 and depress lever 70 while turning the crank. The relative position of lever 70 with respect to the operators hand will not change during rotation of the crank.

Pivotal lever 70 has depending therefrom a camming ring 73 providing a nose portion 74. As more clearly seen in FIG. 7, the camming ring 73 is generally annular in shape so that the connector 62 may be disposed within said ring. Thus, as

the lever 70 is pivoted about pin 80, the nose portion 74 of ring 73 will abut the camming piston 54in an area immediately below the connector 62 as may be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6. Since during rotation of the crank the lever 70 will rotate with respect to body 35, nose 74 of ring 73 may similarly rotate The operation of the driving device of this invention will now be described in detail with reference to FIGS. 5 and 6. FIG. 6 shows the normal position of the camming piston 54 and the pivotal lever '70 in-the absence of the application of any external force to the lever 70. Thus, the compression spring 61 interposed between the shoulder 63 and a radial wall of the camming piston 54tends to bias the camming piston away from the shoulder 63. With the camming piston 54 biased to the right as shown in FIG. 6, the lever 70 will assume an outwardly pivoted position with reference to the external surface of the cylindrical element 68. Upon application to lever 70 of forces about pin 80, the lever will pivot into recess 69. Thus, through the action of nose 74 the camming piston 54 will be moved to the left (as seen in FIG. 5). Movement of camming piston 54 to the left produces an upward movement of the cylindrical pin 43 as the frustoconical camming surface 58 moves along bevelled tip portion 75 of pin 43. As is shown in more clearly in FIG. 5, the lever 70 may be pivoted about pin until a stop portion 76 of lever 70 abuts the bottom of recess 69. Again with reference to FIG. 5, an upward motion of the cylindrical pin 43 imparts an upward motion to the entire linkage bringing teeth 50 of pawl 49 into recesses 42 of cylinder 40 thereby to lock cylinder 40 against rotation with respect to body 35.

In the position of FIG. 5, therefore, a rotation of the handle grip 66 and the body 35 about the axis of the cylinder 40 will produce rotation of the cylinder 40 inasmuch as the cylinder is locked to the body 35. Conversely, a rotation of the handle grip 66 and body 35 about the axis of the cylinder 40 will not produce a rotation of cylinder 40 with the pivotal lever 70 in the position of FIG. 6 since teeth 50 are not received in recesses 42 and the cylinder 40 is therefore not locked to the crank body.

'70 that the camming-piston 54 is brought into camming engagement with the cylindrical pin 43 to move the teeth 50 into the recesses 42 thus positively to lock cylinder 40 with respect to body 35.

The application of the driving device of this invention to a tube bending tool will now be described with reference to FIG. 1.

As was previously pointed out, the crank shaft 19 of the tube bending tool is nonrotatably received within a recess of the cylinder 40 of the crank arm 22. However, in the absence of an external force, the pivotal lever 70 of the handle grip 66 assumes the position of FIG. 6 due to the compression springs 45 and 61. Thus, the teeth 50 of the pawl 49 in FIG. 1 are not received within recesses 42 of the cylinder 40. As a result, the cylinder 40 is free to rotate with the crankshaft 19 independently of the body 35 of the crank arm 22. Alternately, the body 35 of the crank arm 22 is free to rotate with respect to the cylinder 40. As a result, under the influence of gravity, crank arm 22 will be normally positioned as shown in FIG. 1. The position of the crank arm 22 of FIG. 1 is considered desirable because it does not interfere with the normal operations involving the placing of tubes within the tube bender.

During the setting-up operation, prior to the actual bending of the tube itself, the operator may freely rotate the forming roll 28 by hand without producing a similar rotation of the crank arm 22. While rotation of the forming roll 28 will produce rotation of gears 18 and 17, and crankshaft 19, the cylinder 40 is free to rotate with respect to the body 35 of the crank arm 22. Because of inertia effects, the crank arm 22 will retain the position of FIG. 1 in spite of manual rotation of the forming roll 28 prior to positioning of the tube in place. When it is desired to complete a bend, the operator merely depresses the pivotal lever 70 of the handle grip 66 and rotates the crank arm about the axis of the crankshaft l9. Depressing the pivotal lever 70 moves the teeth 50 of pawl 49 into recesses 42 of cylinder 40 thus locking the cylinder against rotation with respect to the body 35 of the crank arm 22. Rotation of the crank arm about the axis of the crankshaft 19 with lever 70 depressed imparts a rotary motion to crankshaft l9, gears 17, 18 and the forming roll 28. Upon completion of the desired bend, the operator merely releases the pivotal lever 70 thereby disengaging teeth 50 of pawl 49 from the walls of cylinder 40 defining the recesses 42. Having released the pivotal lever 70, the operator then releases the handle grip 66 permitting the crank arm 22 to freewheel about the stationary crankshaft 19 (under the influence of gravity), thus to assume the position of FIG. 1.

Accordingly, the driving device of applicants invention, as applied to a crank arm for use in a tube bending tool, has a number of advantages heretofore unknown in the art. Crank arm 22 is always freewheeling except when the pivotal lever 70 is positively depressed by the operator. The crank arm 22 will thus always assume the position of FIG. 1 regardless of the orientation of the crankshaft 19. The crank arm therefore is less likely to interfere with normal functions attendant to the placing of tubing in position for bending, and the release of tubing after completion of the bend. Since the crank arm is always freewheeling with respect to the crankshaft 19, the operator may, at any time, manually adjust the forming roll 28 without rotating the crank arm.

In the event that it is inconvenient to rotate the crankshaft 19 in order to complete a bend, the crank arm 22 may be removed from the end of the crankshaft l9 and positioned on surface 29 ofstub shaft 23.

ASSEMBLY OF THE INVENTION A brief description of the assembly of applicants driving device will now be made with reference to FIG. 5. The compression spring 61 and camming piston 54 is first disposed about the connector 62. Connector 62 is thereafter secured to element 68 of handle grip 66 by means of fastener 67.

With cover 52 removed, the cylinder 40, pawl 49 and carrier 47 are disposed within counterbore 39. Spring 45 is next placed over cylindrical pin 43 and the latter is inserted into counterbore 37 of body 35 through access hole 77. Upon engagement of the cylindrical projection 44 with the carrier 47, the cylindrical pin 43 is rotated to advance threads 46 into carrier 47. Rotation may be imparted to the cylindrical pin43 by either a screwdriver inserted through access hole 77 into engagement with a suitable slot (not shown) in the free end of pin 43 or by an Allen wrench inserted in access hole 77 to engage a suitable recess of the pin.

The free end of connector 62 is then inserted in bore 64 of body 35 until shoulder 63 abuts an internal wall surface of body 35. A washer 65 and fastener 64a are then inserted into place to hold shoulder 63 firmly against the internal wall surface of body 35.

ADVANTAGES OF THE INVENTION Applicants driving device offers a number of advantages heretofore unknown to the art. Applicants articulated carrier and pawl permits a smooth interengagement of the pawl teeth and the recesses of the rotating cylinder. The annular camming piston is slidably received in and supported by the walls defining the counterbore 56 of body 35. Further, the annular camming piston 54 is slidably supported by the connector element 62 permitting the connector element and handle grip to rotate with respect to the piston. Thus, a lost motion connection is established between lever 70 and pin 43 allowing the operator to conveniently hold the handle grip and actuate lever 70 while rotating the entire crank assembly. The

axis of the annular camming piston is normal to the axis of the cylindrical pin 43 thereby imparting a high mechanical advantage to the handle grip and pivotal lever 70. Further, because the camming ring abuts and annular piston below the connector element, the mechanical advantage of the pivotal lever is increased permitting sufficient movement of the camming piston with a slight amount of rotation of the pivotal lever.

For ease of description, the principles of the invention have been set forth in connection with but a single illustrated embodiment showing an improved crank. It is not our intention that the illustrated embodiment nor the terminology employed in describing it be limiting inasmuch as variations in these may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. Rather we desire to be restricted only by the scope of the appended claims. I

I claim: l. A driving device for imparting rotary motion to a driven member comprising:

a generally elongated body having a first and second end portion, a rotatable cylinder disposed within said first end portion of said body, said cylinder including, a plurality of teeth defining recesses on the external surface thereof, and, means to engage a driven member in nonrotatable relationship, an elongated shaft disposed within said body and extending generally from said first end portion to said second end portion, said shaft including, a toothed surface at one end thereof adapted to enter said recesses of said cylinder,

means to bias said shaft-toothed surface out of said recesses of said cylinder,

piston means disposed within said second end portion of said body, and including,

a cam surface,

means to bias said cam surface away from said shaft,

handle grip means associated with said second end portion of said body and having an axis parallel to said piston means axis, said handle grip means being rotatable relative to said body andincluding,

a pivotal lever having a piston means-engaging portion adapted to move said piston means against said second recited bias means upon pivoting of said lever in a first direction to move said cam surface of said piston means into camming engagement with said shaft and thereby to bring said toothed surface into said recesses of said cylinder,

whereby rotation of said body about the axis of said cylinder will impart rotary motion to a driven member engaged with said cylinder.

2. The invention of claim 1 in which said toothed surface is further defined as a toothed element pivotally mounted to one end of said shaft.

3. The invention of claim 1 in which said body includes a bore and at least one counterbore and said shaft is a generally cylindrical pin slidably received and supported within said counterbore, said pin having a cylindrical projection slidably received and supported within said bore.

4. The invention of claim 3 in which said cylindrical projection is screw threadedly attached to said toothed surface.

5. The invention of claim 3 in which said first recited bias means is defined as a compression spring disposed about said cylindrical projection and abutting said cylindrical pin and the radial surface of said body defining said counterbore.

6. A driving device for imparting rotary motion to a driven member comprising:

a generally elongated body having a bore, a counterbore,

and a first and second end portion,

a rotatable cylinder disposed within said first end portion of said body, said cylinder including,

a plurality of teeth defining recesses on the external surface thereof, and

means to engage a driven member in nonrotatable relationship,

an elongated shaft disposed within said body and extending generally from said first end portion to said second end portion,-said shaft including,

a toothed surface at one end thereof adapted to enter said recesses of said cylinder,

means to bias said shaft toothed surface out of said recesses of said cylinder,

piston means disposed within said second end portion of said body in said counterbore, said piston means being defined by a substantially cylindrical element having a bore, said cylindrical element including a cylindrical shoulder of lesser diameter than said cylindrical element and a frustoconical camming surface adjacent said shoulder, said piston means reciprocable on an axis normal to the axis of said shaft, and including,

means to bias said camming surface away from said shaft,

handle grip means associated with said second end portion of said body and having an axis parallel to said piston means axis, said handle grip means including,

a pivotal lever having a piston means engaging portion adapted to move said piston means against said second recited bias means upon pivoting of said lever in a first direction to move said camming surface of said piston means into camming .engagement with said shaft and thereby to bring said toothed surface into said recesses of said cylinder,

whereby rotation of said body about the axis of said cylinde will impart rotary motion to a driven member engaged with said cylinder.

7. The invention of claim 6 in which said grip handle means is rotatably secured to said body by a substantially cylindrical connector disposed within said bore of said cylindrical element and rotatably secured at one end thereof to said body and secured at the other end to said grip handle means.

8. The invention of claim 7 in which said pivotal lever includes a cam ring disposed about said connector and abutting said cylindrical element.

9. The invention of claim 6 in which said second recited bias means is defined as a compression spring disposed substantially within a counterbore of said cylindrical element and abutting said body.

10. The invention of claim 6 in which said shaft includes a frustoconical surface at the end thereof abutting said cylindrical element.

11. A driving device for imparting rotary motion to a driven member comprising:

with teeth adapted to enter recesses defined in the external surface of said cylinder so as to lock said cylinder against rotation relative to said body when said pin is in a first position,

means to bias said pin away from said cylinder to a second position wherein said teeth of said pin are clear of the recesses of said cylinder,

a cylindrical piston reciprocably supported in said body adjacent said handle, the axis of said piston being parallel to the axis of said handle,

a cylindrical shoulder on said piston against which said pin is adapted to abut,

a frustoconical camming surface on said piston adjacent said shoulder,

means to bias said camming surface away from said pin,

a pivotal lever carried by said handle, said lever including a cam ring adapted to abut said piston whereby pivotal movement of said lever produces reciprocable movement of said piston bnngmg said camming surface into contact with said pin thereby moving said teeth into said recesses of said 12. A driving device for imparting rotary motion to a driven member comprising:

a body supporting a cylinder at one end thereof and a handle at the other end thereof, said cylinder and handle being rotatable relative to said body,

a passageway in said body,

a reciprocable pin disposed in said passageway,

the end of said pin adjacent said cylinder being provided with teeth adapted to enter recesses defined in the external surface of said cylinder so as to lock said cylinder against rotation relative to said body,

a pivotal lever carried by said handle,

lost motion interconnecting means between said pivotal lever and said pin whereby pivotal movement of said lever produces linear movement of said pin thereby moving said teeth into said recesses of said cylinder.

13. The invention of claim 12 in which said lost motion interconnecting means is defined as a substantially cylindrical piston received within said body and having a frustoconical camming surface,

a piston means engaging portion extending from said pivotal lever and adapted to move said piston,

whereby upon pivoting of said lever said camming surface of said piston moves into camming engagement with said pin thereby to move said teeth into said recesses of said cylinder.

14. The invention of claim 13 in which said handle is secured to said body by a substantially cylindrical connector disposed within a bore of said piston and rotatably secured at one end thereof to said body while secured at the other end thereof to said handle.

15. The invention of claim 14 in which said piston means engaging portion is defined as a cam ring disposed about said connector and adapted to abut said position.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1343531 *Mar 24, 1919Jun 15, 1920Tennyson Alexander CAutomobile-cranker
US2156200 *Feb 3, 1938Apr 25, 1939Smyers Norman BMachine handle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4934659 *Mar 13, 1989Jun 19, 1990Yoke James HHoist and dolly apparatus
US5513544 *Jul 7, 1994May 7, 1996J. W. Winco, Inc.Locking, retracting mechanism for crank handles
US6349615 *Oct 2, 1998Feb 26, 2002Robert Bosch GmbhLever
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/548
International ClassificationG05G1/08, G05G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG05G1/085
European ClassificationG05G1/08B