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Publication numberUS3603802 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1971
Filing dateJul 24, 1969
Priority dateJul 24, 1969
Publication numberUS 3603802 A, US 3603802A, US-A-3603802, US3603802 A, US3603802A
InventorsFrank Petric
Original AssigneeFrank Petric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote control automobile motor starter
US 3603802 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventor Frank Petric 37 Franklin Blvd., St. Catbarines, Ontario, Canada Appl. No. 844,561

Filed July 24, 1969 Patented Sept, 7, 1971 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 799,048, Feb. 13, 1969, now abandoned.

REMOTE CONTROL AUTOMOBILE MOTOR STARTER 22 Claims, 3 Drawing Fifi.

us. (:1 290/37, 290/38 Int. Cl. F02n 11/00 Field of Search 290/38, 37

STEP-SWITCH 37-13 IPECE/VER 2 HOLD/N5 8077a 1 o ON 0 FF V11 SWITCH TRANSMITTER References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1947 3/l96l 9/1962 5/1969 7/1969 ll/l969 Moncrief Dominguez-Rego Fuciarelli Heert Hawthorne Bucher Primary ExaminerG. R. Simmons Attorney-Waste" & l-lanley 290/38 290/38 290/38 290/38 X 290/38 X 290/38 X ABSTRACT: A method and device for starting an internal combustion engine by remote control, in which a single frequency receiver, and preferably a single frequency transmitter, are used. The motor is started by transmitting two signals within a maximum time interval, preferably a predetermined time interval, between them. A discharging capacitor governs the device using a maximum time interval while a timing mechanism together with switch means or a capacitor governs the device using a predetermined time interval.

STEP-SWITCH MOTOR IGNITION RELAY call. 58

HORN SHUNT mimosa? mm 31503802 sum 3 BF 3 FIG. 3

INVEN'TOR.

FRANK PETRIC REMOTE CONTROL AUTOMOBILE MOTOR STARTER This application is a continuation-in-part of my US. Pat. application Ser. No. 799,048 filed Feb. 13, 1969, and now abandoned.

The present invention relates to the remote control starting of an internal combustion engine such as an automobile motor.

It is often advantageous to start an automotive vehicle from a remote location, especially in northern climates where it takes several minutes to warm up a car after it has been left idle for several hours. A number of devices have been proposed to accomplish this purpose whereby the operator may start the vehicle while indoors. Such devices usually take the form of circuitry which is added to the wiring system of the automobile and this circuitry is connected with a control apparatus through a cable. An example of this type of device is disclosed in US. Pat. No.2,544,955 issued Mar. 13, 1951 to W. N. Harrelson. Since the use of this type of device is limited to locations where a cable may be installed, further proposals have been made for starting devices which are remotely controlled by wireless signals, such as the device disclosed in US. Pat. No 3,054,904 issued Sept. 18, 1962 to F. Fuciarelli. However, that device employs a transmitter having two channels, which complicates its structure, and furthermore the device is vulnerable to misuse by others knowing the channel frequencies of the transmitter.

It is an object of the invention to provide a remote control device for starting an internal combustion engine, which is operable by radio waves of a single frequency.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a remote control device for starting an internal combustion engine, which affords increased protection against unauthorized use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a remote control device which is operable on a single frequency to both start and stop an internal combustion engine.

Example embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of a remote control starter coupled with an engine circuit;

FIG. 2 is a schematic circuit diagram of an alternate embodiment of the remote control starter circuit taken to the left of line A-A of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a schematic circuit diagram of a further alternate embodiment of the remote control starter circuit taken to the left of line 8-8 of FIG. 2.

The embodiment illustrated. in FIG. 1 of the drawings consists of a transmitter 10 having an on-off switch 11 and a holding or keying button 12. Transmitter 10, which may be portable, is matched with a receiver 13 mounted in an internal combustion motor vehicle (not shown) which operates a relay Rl.

A battery 14 is connected through an on-off master switch 66 to a line 15 and thence in series through a resistor 16, contacts Rl-l of relay R1 in receiver 13, normally closed contacts R3-l of a double-pole, double-throw relay R3, and the solenoidof a relay R4 to ground; Battery 14 is also connected in series through resistor 16, normally open contacts R3-2 of relay R3, and the solenoid of 'relay R5 to ground. A line 15a connects the negativeterminalof battery 14 to ground.

Battery 14 is again connected by line 15in series through a resistor 20, a variable resistor-21 (such as a lamp), a solenoid 22, and normally open contacts R42'of relay R4 to ground. Solenoid 22 acts on a shaft23 connected, in timer 25, to one arm of a pivot bar 26 which isfixed to a rotating fulcrum pin 27with theother arm of thexbar carrying an adjustable balancing weight 28. A spring 24' connects shaft 23 with the frame of timer 25. Also fixed to fulcrum pin 27'is a gear 29 which acts, if necessary through one o'r-more intermediate gears diagrammatically shown, to rotate a grounded contact wheel 31 having a lug 32 extending radially from its periphery. Lug 32 is adapted to meet, in sequence, two flexible contacts 33 and 34 when gear wheel 31 rotates. Contacts 33 and 34 are staggered longitudinally with respect to lug 32. One side 32a of lug 32 is totally insulated while the other side 32b of the lug is insulated at its top 32c, whereby the lug closes with contact 33 only on its return travel. Contact 33 is connected in series through solenoid R3-Sl of relay R3, normally open contacts R4-l or relay R4, and a resistor 35 to line 15 and battery 14. Contact 34 is connected in series through the solenoid of a relay R6 and a resistor 36 to line 15 and battery 14.

Battery 14 is connected through line 15 and resistor 35 in series with solenoid R3-S2 of relay R3 and normally open contact 37-B of step switch 37. Normally open contact 37-A of step switch 37 is connected in series through the solenoid of a relay R7 and a resistor 38 to line 15 and battery 14. Step switch 37 has six stations with contact 37-A bridging stations 1 to 5 inclusive and contact 37-8 lying between stations 5 and 6. A motor actuator 40 of step switch 37 has one lead 41 connected in series to the normally open contact R5-3.1 of relay R5 and a resistor 42 to line 15 and battery 14. Lead 41 is also connected in series through normally closed contacts R2-3 of relay R2 and normally closed contacts R5-3.2 to series resistor 42 and battery 14. A second lead 43 from motor actuator 40 is also connected in series through normally closed contacts R5-3.2 of relay R5 and resistor 42 to battery 14. A third lead 44 from motor actuator 40 is connected through parallel, normally open contacts R7-2 of relay R7 and normally open contacts R2-3 of relay R2 to ground.

The grounded solenoid of an accelerator relay R8 is connected by a line 50 in series through normally open contacts R6-1 of relay R6 to line 15 and battery 14. Line 50 also is connected in series through normally open contacts RS-l of relay R5 to: (a) in series, normally open contacts R7-l of relay R7, normally open contacts R5-2 of relay R5, a line 53, the normally closed contacts 52-1 of a vacuum switch 52, and the solenoid of a starter relay R11 to ground; and (b) in series, normally open contacts R7-l of relay R7 to a line 51 leading to the solenoid of a grounded ignition relay R9.

The positive terminal of battery 14 is connected through normally open contacts R8-1 of accelerator relay R8 to a solenoid 54 which rotates to actuate an accelerator rod 55 connected with carburetor 56. The positive terminal of battery 14 is also connected (a) through the normally open contacts R9-l of ignition relay R9 and through a resistor 57 to coil 58 of a grounded distributor 59 of the vehicle engine, and (b) through normally open contacts R11-2 of relay R1 1 to coil 58 bypassing contacts R9-l and resistor 57. Finally, the positive terminal of battery 14 is connected through normally open contacts R11-l of starter relay R11 to a grounded starter motor 60.

The solenoid of a horn shunt relay R10 is connected from line 53, between normally closed contacts 52-1 of vacuum switch 52 and the solenoid of starter relay R11, to solenoid 54 in parallel with normally open contacts R8-1 of relay R8.

Normally open contacts R10-1 of shunt relay R10 connect a horn relay R12 of the automobile to ground, bypassing a horn 70. Normally open contacts 52-2 of vacuum switch 52 connect the positive terminal of battery 14 with electrical accessories such as a grounded heater 72. Vacuum switch 52 is connected by a tube 61 with the intake manifold of the automobile engine.

An on-off safety switch 14a actuated by the gear shift of the vehicle transmission, whether automatic or manual, connects battery 14, through master switch 66, in series with a line 64 leading from battery 14 through a resistor 65 and the solenoid of relay R2 to ground. Master switch 66 located in series with switch 14a to disconnect receiver 13 and conserve power.

An ignition switch 67 of the automobile is connected (a) by Power for receiver 13 is drawn from the positive terminal of battery 14 through line 64 and a line 80 in parallel with relay R2, line 80 having in series a resistor 81 and normally closed contacts R7-3 of relay R7. The output of receiver 13 leads to the negative terminal of a second battery 83 (say 9 volts) and in parallel through normally closed contacts R7-4 of relay R7 to ground. The positive terminal of battery 83 connects through normally open contacts R2-1 of relay R2 to the input of receiver 13. A diode 84 is located in line 80 between resistor 81 and relay contacts R7-3, and is poled to pass current in the direction of receiver 13.

Line 50 is connected in series through normally open contacts R-] of relay R5 with line 80, and line 51 is connected in series through normally open contacts R7-1 of relay R7 with line 80. Thus power is available to lines 50 and 51 from battery 14 through line 64 when both switches 62 and 66 are closed.

To operate the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, the driver of the vehicle closes switch 66 and then leaves the gearshift transmission in neutral position which closes switch 14a to energize relay R2 and also to supply power to receiver 13. Also, contacts R2-1 are closed which allows battery 83 to receive a continuous charge from battery 14. At any time an operator may start the engine of the vehicle by actuating on-off switch 11 of transmitter to the on position which causes the transmitter to be ready for operation. Holding button 12 is then pressed, which puts out a signal from transmitter 10, energizing relay R1 in receiver 13 and closing contacts R1-1 to complete a circuit from battery 14 through closed contacts R3-1 and the solenoid of relay R4. This closes contacts R4-2 which energizes solenoid 22 to windup gear 29 of timer 25 in a counterclockwise direction (as seen in the drawing) by raising weight 28. Gear 31 also rotates counterclockwise and causes lug 32 to pass contact 33 with only its insulated tip 32c touching that contact and come to rest with the conducting portion of side 32b of the lug meeting contact 34. This energizes solenoid R6 to close contact R6-l and energize the solenoid of accelerator relay R8. On releasing keying button 12 to open contacts R4-2 and release shaft 23, weight 28 causes gears 29 and 31 to unwind (clockwise) and on its return journey, lug 32 on its conducting side meets contact 33 with no effect (contact R4-l being open). In this way the accelerator can be pumped by repeatedly pressing keying button 12.

On pressing holding button 12 to wind up timer 25, and then releasing the keying button side 32a of, lug 32 will meet contact 33 after a predetermined time lapse, say 3 seconds as set by means of the timer, as gear 31 unwinds (clockwise as seen in the drawing). By pressing holding button 12 again after this specific time lapse, contacts R4-l are again closed by the energizing of relay R4 and solenoid R3-S1 is energized which throws relay R3, opening contacts R3-1 to deenergize relay R4 and closing contacts R3-2 to energize relay R5. This closes contacts R5-3.1 which actuates motor 40 of step switch 37 (contacts R2-2 of relay R2 being closed) to close contact 37-A and energize relay R7, causing contact R7-1 to close and energize ignition relay R9. The energization or relay R5 also closes contact R5-2 to energize starter relay R11 and closes contacts R5-1 to energize accelerator relay R8. It will be noted that starter relay R11 will not be energized until step switch 37 has been activated to energize relay R7 and close contacts R7-1.

Energization of relay R7 also opens contacts R7-3 and R7-4, disconnecting battery 14 from receiver 13 and preventing a surge of current passing into the receiver which continues to be fed from battery 83 through closed contacts R2-1. Diode 84 prevents a feedback of power from battery 83 into line 65 if there is a momentary deenergization of battery 14.

The operation of the vehicle engine throws vacuum switch 52 which opens contacts 52-1 to deenergize starter relay R1 1 and closes contacts 52-2 to operate heater 70 and any other accessories. After the automobile motor has started, holding button 12 may be released and transmitter 10 turned off by switch 11.

The automobile motor may also be shut off by remote control. This is done by turning on transmitter 10 by switch 11 and pressing holding button 12 repeatedly which actuates step switch 37, through line 41 and closed contacts R5-3.1, to close contact 37-B momentarily which in turn energizes solenoid R3-S2 to throw relay R3. This opens contacts R3-2, deenergizes relay R5 and cuts off the ignition circuit of the motor by opening contacts R5-1, the solenoids of relays R6 and R7 being also deenergized to leave contacts R6-l and R7-1 in their normally open positions.

To prevent actuation of circuit when the vehicle is in gear, the operation of the gear shift out of its neutral position opens switch 14a which cuts off the power from battery 13 to receiver 13 and deenergizes the solenoid of relay R2 to open contacts R2-1, thus preventing relay R1 from being energized from battery 83.

When accelerator relay R8 is actuated alone, contacts R8-1 are closed and horn shunt relay R10 is actuated, closing normally open contacts R10-l and sounding horn 70. However, when both accelerator relay R8 and starter relay R11 are actuated, horn shunt relay R10 is not actuated until the automobile engine starts, whereupon vacuum switch 52 disconnects starter relay R8 and horn 70 sounds until holding button 12 of transmitter 10 is released.

It will be appreciated that step switch 37 advances one station when switches 14a and 66 are closed and again each time relay contacts R53.l and R532 are closed (alternately). When switches 14a or 66 are opened, relay contacts R2-3 close and step switch 37 is advanced to neutral with motor 40 being disconnected. A cam mechanism may be used to perform the same function as the step switch arm and stations.

To summarize the operation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, the vehicle engine is started remotely by throwing switch 11 into an on position and depressing holding button 12 until contact 34 of timer 25 is grounded (say at least 6 seconds), at which time accelerator relay R8 and solenoid 54 are actuated to pump gas. Holding button 12 is then released and after a predetermined time interval (say 3 seconds) the holding button is again depressed to actuate ignition relay R9 and starter relay R10, whereupon the engine is started. To stop the engine, holding button 12 is pressed repeatedly.

In summary, to start the automobile engine using the circuit of FIG. 1, keying button 12 of transmitter 10 is pressed and held for at least a predetermined time (the time taken to wind up timer 25) each time the accelerator is to be actuated. After releasing button 12 the engine can be started by pressing the button again after a predetermined time interval (the time taken for timer 25 to wind down and carry lug 32 from contact 34 to contact 33). To shut off the engine, keying button 12 is pressed and released repeatedly.

In the alternate embodiment shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, taken to the left of line A-A of FIG. 1, line 15 from battery 14 is connected (a) in series through a resistor 110, the solenoid of a relay R101, normally closed contacts R102-1 of a triple-pole, double-throw relay R102, and normally open contacts R103-1 of a relay R103 to ground, (b) in series through a resistor 111, the solenoid of a relay R104, normally open contacts R102-2 of relay Rl-2, and normally open contacts R103-1 to ground and (c) in series through a resistor 112, the solenoid of a relay R105, and the normally open contacts R102-3 of relay R102 to ground.

Contact 33 of timer 25 is connected in series with solenoid R102-S1 of relay R102, normally open contact R101-2 of relay R101, and a resistor 113, to line 15. Contact 34 of timer 25 is connected, in parallel with relay R104, with normally open contacts R102-2 and thence through normally open contacts R103-1 of relay R103 to ground.

Line 15 is connected in series through resistor 1 l3, solenoid R102-S2 of relay 102, normally open contacts R1012 of relay R101, and, in parallel, (a) normally open contacts R105-1 of a relay R105 and (b) normally closed contacts R106-2 of relay R106, to ground. Line 15 is also connected in series through a resistor 114, solenoid 22, and normally open contacts R101-1 of relay R101 to ground.

Line 64 connects in series with a resistor 115 and the solenoid of relay R106 to ground. Line 64 is also connected in series with a normally closed contact R105-1.2 of relay 105, a resistor 117, and a diode 118 poled to pass current in the direction of a receiver 119 which is grounded through a normally closed contact R105-3 of relay 105. As in the previous embodiment, receiver 119 is matched with transmitter and operates relay R103. The output of receiver 119 leads to the negative terminal of a second battery 120 and in parallel through normally closed contacts R105-3 of relay 105 to ground. The positive terminal of battery 120 connects through normally open contacts R106-1 of relay 106 to the input of receiver 119.

Line 64 is again connected in series through normally open contacts R105-1.1 of relay R105 and normally open contacts R104-3.1 to a capacitor 121 and thence to the ground. Connected in parallel with capacitor 121 is a circuit 122 having in series a resistance 123, normally open contacts R107-1 of a relay R107, and the solenoid of relay 107. Normally closed contacts R104-3.2 of relay 104 and a resistor 124, in series one with the other, are connected in parallel with resistor 123 and contacts R107-1 in circuit 122.

Line 51 is connected (a) through normally open contacts R104-2 of relay 104 with line 53, (b) through normally open contacts R015-l.1 with line 64, and (c) in series through normally closed contacts 107-2.2, a resist or log, and the solenoid of relay R108 (bypassing contacts R104-2) with line 53. Line 51 is grounded through contacts R107-2.2 and normally open contacts R107-2.1 in series with contacts R107-2.2.

Line 50 is connected through normally open contacts R104-1 with line 64.

In the operation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, switches 14a and 66 are closed as before, supplying power to receiver 119 and actuating relay R106 which closes normally open contacts R106-1 to charge battery 120 opens normally closed contacts R106-2. To actuate the device by remote controlled transmitter'10, on-off switch 11 is turned to an on" position and holding button 12 is depressed and held down for a minimum predetermined time sufficient to wind up timer 25 (say 6 seconds) as previously described, and the button is then released. The depression of button 12 energizes relay R103 of receiver 119 which closes contacts R103-1 to ground relay R102, thus actuating relay R101 which closes contacts R101-1 to wind up timer 25 and closes contacts R101-2 to be ready to pass a current when contact 33 is grounded by lug 32 of the timer. When timer 25 has been wound up and lug 32 grounds contact 34, relay R104 is energized to (a) close contacts R104-1 and energize accelerator rely R8 through line 50, (b) close contacts R104-2, (c) close contacts R104-3.1 for passage of current to capacitor 121 when contacts R105-1.1 are later opened, and (d) open contacts R104-3.2 to prevent discharge of capacitor 121 through resistor 124. When contact 34 is grounded and accelerator relay R8 is actuated to move solenoid 54, horn 70 sounds until button 12 is released.

After waiting a predetermined time (say 3 seconds) after button 12 is released, the button is again depressed in coincidence with the grounding of contact 33 by lug 32. This again energizes relay R103 which closes contacts R103-1 to ground relay R102 and energize relay R101. The energization of relay R103 also energizes coil R102-S1 which throws relay switch R102 which contacts R102-2' to energize relay R104, (b) closes contacts R102-3 to energize relay R105, and (c) opens contacts R102-1 to deenergize relay R101 and open contacts R101-1. The energization of relay R104 effects the same results as above including the energization of accelerator relay R8. The energization of relay R105 acts to (a) close contacts R105-1.1 which (1) energizes ignition relay R9 and (2) charges capacitor 121, (b) open contacts R105-1.2 which cuts off the charge transmitter 119 and battery 120, and (c) close contacts R105-2 (contacts R106-2 and R108-1 being open).

As timer 25 winds down and lug 32 no longer grounds contact 33 (i.e. lug 32 passes contact33), the continued depression of holding button 12 and energization of relay R103, R104, and R energizes ignition relay R9 and starter relay R11 which allows the engine to start whereupon born 17 sounds to inform the operator that the holding button may be released. If button 12 is released before the engine starts, relay R103 is deenergized which opens contacts R103-l and deenergizes relay R104 to close contacts R104-3.2. This discharges capacitor 121 and energizes relay R107 to close contacts R107-2.1 and open contacts R107-2.2. Relay R108 is grounded through starter relay R11 and is actuated to close contacts R108-1 and, since contacts R105-2 are also closed, solenoid R102-S2 on relay R102 is grounded, which throws relay R102 to close contacts R102-1 and open contacts R102-2 and R102-3 which returns the system to its starting position.

To shut off the motor, holding button 12 is depressed which energizes relay R103 and closes contacts R103-1. This energizes relay R104 to close contacts R104-3.1 and open contacts R104-3.2, thus charging capacitor 121. If button 12 is now released, contacts R103-l are opened and relay R104 is deenergized to close contacts R1043.2, thus discharging capacitor 121 through relay R107 which closes contacts R107-21. If button 12 is again pressed to close contacts R103-1 while capacitor 121 is discharging, relay R108 is energized by grounding since contacts R105-1.1, and R104-2 and R107-2.1 are all closed. This closes contacts R108-l and energizes solenoid R102-S2 by grounding since contacts R105-2 are also closed. The energization of solenoid R102-S2 throws relay switch R102 which turns everything off. Therefore, to turn off the motor, button 12 is depressed once and released, and is then depressed again within the time range of discharge of capacitor 121 (say 1% seconds) and released.

To accelerate the motor (and also to sound the horn) button 12 is depressed a single time during the operation of the motor (this happens also on the first depression of the button when the motor is being shut off).

If the motor quits by itself, horn 70 sounds but only for approximately 1 second unless the ignition fails to shut off.

To summarize the operation of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, the vehicle motor is started remotely throwing switch 11 into an on position and operating holding button 12, as before. Accelerator solenoid 54 may be actuated as many times as desired by depressing holding button 12 for a length of time enabling contact 34 of timer 25 to be grounded (say at least 6 seconds). To start the car motor, holding button 12 is depressed until contact 34 is grounded, whereupon the holding button is released. After a predetermined time lapse, (say 3 seconds) holding button 12 is again depressed and held in that position until the engine starts and horn 70 sounds. While button 12 is held depressed, capacitor 121 charges for later operation, should the engine fail to start before the button is released, to return the circuit to its original nonoperating condition. To stop the motor, holding button 12 is depressed, released, and pressed again immediately (within the time of discharge of capacitor 121). Horn 70 will sound on each depression of button 12. Horn 70 will sound on each depression of button 12. To make sure the motor is off, holding button 12 may be depressed again and if the engine is not shut off then horn 70 will sound.

In further embodiment shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, the circuit to the left on line B-B in FIG. 2 is modified by eliminating timer 25. Line 15 connects in series through resistor 113, solenoid R102-$1, normally open contacts R10103 of relay R101, and normally open contacts R101-l of a relay R110, to ground. Also, line 15 is grounded, between the solenoid of relay 104 and contacts R102-2, through normally open contacts R101-2 of relay R101. Finally, line 15 is connected in series through a resistor 140, normally open contacts R101-4.1 of relay R101 and a capacitor tor ground. Connected in parallel with capacitor 130 is a circuit 131 having in series normally closed contacts R101-1.2, a resistance 132, and the solenoid of relay R110. Normally open contacts R1l0-2 of relay R110 and a resistor 133, in series one with another, are connected in parallel with contacts RIM-1.2 and resistance 132 in circuit 131.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3 the elimination of timer 25 allows the motor to be started by pressing keying button 12 twice, without any predetermined intervening time lapse. As in the previous embodiments, the car engine is started by a remote control by first turning on-off switch 11 into an on" position and then depressing holding button 12. This energizes relay R103 and closes contacts R103-1 to energize relay R101. The energization of relay R101 closes contacts Rl011.1 to charge a capacitor 130 while contacts R101-1.2 are opened to prevent premature discharge of the capacitor. Also, contacts R101-2 are closed to energize relay R104 and actuate accelerator relay R8. Contacts R101-3 are also closed.

The release of holding button 12 deenergizes relay R103 and opens contacts Rl03-1 to deenergize relay R101. This opens contacts R1011.1 and closes contacts R1011.2 to discharge capacitor 130 which passes current and energizes relay R1 10. Contacts R1 -2 of relay R110 are thus closed to ensure complete discharge of capacitor 130, and contacts RllO-l are also closed. At the same time contacts R101-1 and contacts R101-3 are opened by the deenergization of relay R101.

By pressing holding button 12 a second time while capacitor 130 is discharging (say within 2 seconds) relay R103 is again energized to close contacts R103-1 and ground relay R102 which energizes relay R101 and closes contacts R10l-3. Since capacitor 130 is still discharging and energizing relay R110, contacts R110-1 are still closed and consequently solenoid R102-S1 is energized to throw relay R102. This opens contacts R102-l and closes contacts R102-2 and R102-3, thus energizing relays R104 and R105 to start the engine in the same manner as described in the previous embodiment.

To summarize the operation of the embodiment showing FIG. 3 of the drawings, the vehicle engine is started remotely by throwing switch 11 into an on position, pressing holding button 12 to charge capacitor 130, releasing button 12 to discharge the capacitor, and immediately pressing the holding button again while the capacitor is discharging, thus throwing relay R102 to start the engine. Accelerator solenoid 54 is actuated on the first depression of holding button 2; if it is desired to pump more gas without starting the engine, it is merely necessary to wait until capacitor 130 has discharged (say more than 2 seconds) before depressing the holding button again.

I claim:

1. A method of remotely controlling an internal combustion engine, comprising the steps of:

a. transmitting a first signal to close the normally open contacts of a relay in a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency and initiate the operation of timing means controlling the actuation of switch means; and

b. after a predetermined time interval from the termination of the first signal, transmitting a second signal to reclose said contacts and actuate the switch means to close the ignition and starter circuits of the engine.

2. A method as claimed in claim 1 in which the timing means is constructed and arranged to close, after said predetermined time interval and in conjunction with the reclosing of said relay contacts, an actuating circuit for the switch means.

3. A method as claimed in claim 1 in which the transmission of the first signal also actuates means to operate the accelerator of the engine.

4. A method as claimed in claim 3 in which the initiation of operation of the timing means momentarily closes a pair of further contacts to energize the accelerator actuating means.

5. A method as claimed in claim 1 including the step of repeatedly transmitting a third signal to further actuate the switch means to open the ignition circuit and shut off the engine.

6. A device for remotely controlling an internal combustion engine having an ignition circuit and starter circuit, comprismg:

a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency;

timing means initiated in operation in response to reception of a first signal by said receiver; and

switch means controlled by said timing means and adapted for connection with said ignition and starter circuits whereby upon such connection and upon reception of a second signal by said receiver a predetermined time interval after termination of said first signal said switch means is actuated and said ignition and starter circuits are closed.

7. A device as claimed in claim 6 in which the initiation of operation of the timing mechanism momentarily energizes a relay which actuates means to operate the accelerator of the engine.

8. A device as claimed in claim 6 in which the receiver is responsive to actuate, by a third signal, the switch means to open the ignition circuit and shut off the engine.

9. A device as claimed in claim 6 in which the switch means comprises a step-switch.

10. A device as claimed in claim 6 in which said first signal energizes a relay closing a solenoid circuit to actuate the timing means and the second signal, together with timing mechanism at said predetermined interval, closes a circuit which actuates switch means to close the ignition and starter circuits.

11. The device of claim 6 including a main direct current power source for said engine;

said main power source being connected to said receiver;

an auxiliary direct current power source;

said auxiliary source being connected to said receiver and to said main source;

and means upon closing of the ignition and starter circuits to disconnect said main source from said auxiliary source and receiver.

12. A method of remotely controlling an internal combustion engine, comprising the steps of:

a. transmitting a first signal to close the normally open contacts of a first relay in a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency and initiate the operation of timing means controlling a normally open actuating circuit; and

b. a predetermined time interval after termination of from the first signal, continuously transmitting a second signal to reclose the contacts of the first relay and close the actuating circuit to close the ignition and starter circuits of the engine.

13. A method as claimed in claim 12 in which the transmission of the first signal also actuates means to operate the accelerator of the engine.

14. A method as claimed in claim 13 in which the initiation of operation of the timing means momentarily closes a pair of further contacts to energize the accelerator actuating means.

15. A method as claimed in claim 12 including the steps of:

c. transmitting a third signal reclosing the contacts to actuate a second relay to charge from a power source a capacitor in series in a capacitor circuit, the capacitor discharging in the capacitor circuit on reopening of the contacts; and

d. transmitting a fourth signal after termination of the third while the capacitor is discharging, to reclose the contacts of the first relay and open the actuating circuit to open the ignition circuit and shut off the engine.

16 A device for remotely controlling an internal combustion engine having an ignition circuit and a starter circuit, comprising:

a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency;

timing means initiated in operation in response to reception of a first signal by said receiver; and

a normally open actuating circuit controlled by said timing means and adapted for connection with said ignition and starter circuits whereby upon such connection and upon reception of a second signal by said receiver a predetermined time interval after termination of said first signal said actuating circuit is closed to close said ignition and starter circuits.

17. A device as claimed in claim 16 including a capacitor adapted to be charged responsive to a third signal from the receiver and to discharge on cessation of the third signal, and means responsive to a fourth signal from the receiver after termination of the third signal and while the capacitor is discharging to open the ignition circuit and shut off the engme.

18. A method of remotely controlling an internal combustion engine, comprising the steps of:

a. transmitting a first signal to close the normally open contacts of a first relay in a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency to close the normally open contacts of a second relay and charge a capacitor in series in a capacitor circuit;

b. discharging the capacitor in said circuit on reopening said first relay contacts; and

c. after termination of the first signal, transmitting a second signal to reclose said first relay contacts while the capacitor is discharging, the discharge of the capacitor acting, while the contacts are reclosed, to close an actuating circuit and thereby close the ignition and starter circuits of ate a third relay to charge from the power source a second capacitor in a second capacitor circuit, the second capacitor discharging in the capacitor circuit on reopening the first relay contacts; and

e. transmitting a fourth signal while the second capacitor is discharging, to reclose the first relay contacts and open the actuating circuit and thereby open the ignition circuit of the engine.

21. A device for remotely controlling an internal combustion engine having an ignition circuit and a starter circuit, comprising:

a radio receiver responsive to a single predetermined frequency;

a relay having normally open contacts and initiated in operation in response to reception of a first signal by said receiver;

a power source;

a normally open circuit having a capacitor in series therein and connected with said power source through said relay, the capacitor circuit being adapted to charge the capacitor on closing the contactsof said relay and to discharge the capacitor on reopening the contacts of said relay; and

an actuating circuit adapted for connection with said ignition and starter circuits whereby upon such connection and upon reception of a second signal by said receiver after termination of said first signal and while said capacitor is discharging the contacts of said second relay are reclosed to close said ignition and starter circuits.

22. A device as claimed in claim 21 including a second capacitor adapted to be charged responsive to reception of a third signal by the receiver and to discharge on cessation of the third signal, and means responsive to reception of a fourth signal by the receiver while the second capacitor is discharging to open the ignition circuit and shut off the engine.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3788294 *Dec 21, 1971Jan 29, 1974H LoganRemote control starting device for internal combustion engine
US3859540 *Dec 13, 1973Jan 7, 1975Irving WeinerSystem for remote control of the starting of motor vehicles including visual indication of accelerator linkage and starter circuit actuation
US4006723 *Oct 24, 1974Feb 8, 1977Paul SchmidliControl system for starting and stopping an internal combustion engine
US4446460 *Jul 8, 1981May 1, 1984Transtart, Inc.Remote starting of an internal combustion engine
US5042439 *Mar 15, 1990Aug 27, 1991Gene ThollRemote, safe, and secure operational control of an internal combustion engine
US5601058 *Mar 6, 1995Feb 11, 1997The United States Of America As Represented By The Department Of EnergyStarting apparatus for internal combustion engines
US5689142 *May 24, 1996Nov 18, 1997Continocean Tech Inc.Keyless motor vehicle starting system with anti-theft feature
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Classifications
U.S. Classification290/37.00R, 290/38.00R
International ClassificationF02N11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02N11/00
European ClassificationF02N11/00