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Publication numberUS3604067 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1971
Filing dateAug 12, 1969
Priority dateAug 12, 1969
Publication numberUS 3604067 A, US 3604067A, US-A-3604067, US3604067 A, US3604067A
InventorsDwight C Brown
Original AssigneeDwight C Brown
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clip structure
US 3604067 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent inventor Dwight C. Brown 414 N. Granada St., Arlington, Va. 22203 Appl. No. 849,438 Filed Aug. 12, 1969 Patented Sept. 14, 1971 I Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 815,101, Apr. 10, 1969, now abandoned.

CLIP STRUCTURE 9 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

U.S. Cl 24/67 R,

24/73, 24/259, 402/19 Int. Cl 842i 1/100 Field of Search ..24/67,767. l l,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,256,426 2/1918 Baltzley 24/259 2,184,569 12/ i939 Stewart 24/259 3,398,475 8/ 1968 Palmer 24/677 X 3,452,976 7/ i 969 Ross Primary Examiner-Leonard D. Christian Attorn'ey-Brufsky, Staas, Breiner & Halsey ABSTRACT: A clip structure having a strip of resilient and compressible material secured to one surface of a flat metal strip bent substantially in half. Crimps or corrugations can be made in the metal strip to increase the holding power of the clip structure.

PATENTED SEP 1 419m SHEET 1 OF 2 INVENTOI DWIGHT 0. BROWN ATTORNEYS PATENTED SEP14|97| 3.804067 sum 2 or 2 mvamun DWIGHT C. BROWN ATTORNEYS CLIP STRUCTURE CROSS-REFERENCES This application is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 815,101, filed Apr. 10, 1969 and now abandoned and entitled Clip Structure. 7

This invention relates to a clip structure, and more particularly, to a clip structure adapted to be used as a paper clip, indexing tab, paper punch hole reinforcement, hanger, or the like.

At present, the most common type of paper clip is in the form of a wire shaped to provide some spring gripping action for holding sheets of paper together. These clips have the disadvantage that they mark, mar, indent, or distort fastened paper material. If the paper has to be duplicated, the duplicated sheet will bear a mark where the clip indented the master. Moreover, this problem can be serious in computer cards, wherein an indentation on a card could result in improper processing of the card and costly machine downtime. To eliminate this indentation both on paper and cards, it is a general practice to use small pieces of folded paper placed between the wire gripper surfaces, to serve as protection pads. This is costly in terms of material and time.

Other disadvantages of the wire clip include frequent discoloration of the paper caused by rust formed on the clip, and easy detachment of the clip during stacking and filing of the fastened groups of papers. Although there have been several attempts to provide a low-cost flat-type clip that would eliminate the deficiencies of the wire clip, the metal or plastic construction used did not provide sufficient holding power for good paper fastening.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a paper clip structure having interior contacting surfaces which will not mark, mar, indent, or distort the paper but which still provides sufficient friction holding power to fasten separate sheets of paper, cards, or other flat material securely together.

A further object of this invention is to provide a paper clip structure of the character described which will not wear readily and which will withstand repeated use.

Another object of this invention is to provide a low-cost, die-stamped, flat-type paper clip structure which can also be used for a variety of other applications, such as indexing tabs and paper reinforcement elements and which can be written upon or color coded, without impairing its fastening characteristics.

These objects are accomplished by attaching a strip of resilient and compressible material, such as sponge or foam. cushion material to one surface of a flat metal strip having appropriate temper and springiness and bending the strip substantially in half with the sponge or foam material on each half in facing relation. Paper to be fastened together is inserted between the facing sponge or foam material surfaces, which are the only portions of the clip structure to contact the paper. The sponge or foam material will not mar the paper by leaving an indentation, but will generate sufficient friction to keep the papers fastened. If additional holding power is desired, it has been found that this can be accomplished by forming crimps or corrugations in the metal strip. Tabs can be struck from a surface of the clip structure or holes formed in its surfaces without substantially impairing its functional gripping characteristics, whereby the clip can be used as an indexing tab or as a looseleaf paper reinforcement.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following specification and claims and from the accompanying drawing, wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one form of clip structure forming the subject of the present invention in its open position;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the plane indicated by line 2-2 of FIG. I;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the clip structure of FIG. 1 modified for use as a looseleaf paper or plastic sheet reinforcement;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the clip structure shown in FIG. 1 modified for use as an indexing tab;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the clip structure shown in FIG. 3 put to still a further use as a fastening element;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a modified clip structure formed with corrugations to increase its holding power;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the plane indicated by line 7-7 of FIG 6;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of another clip structure having corrugated surfaces;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of still another clip structure formed with corrugations; and

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the clip structure of FIG. I modified for use as a hanger.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings in detail, wherein like numerals indicate like elements throughout the several views, one embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 as a paper clip generally designated by the numeral 10.

Paper clip 10 having an angle shape is formed from a continuous metal strip 12. Metal strip 12 has a resilient and'compressible backing, such as a foam or sponge cushion 14 secured to one surface thereof. The substantially bisecting metal strip 12 to form spaced gripping fingers 20 and 22. Clip 10 may be stamped from metal sheeting to which the metal 14 has, for example, been adhesively secured.

Separate paper sheets which are to be secured together are inserted between the facing resilient and compressible surfaces of paper clip 10, and the gripping fingers 20 and 22 formed by bending the metal strip 12 at bend line 16 can be clamped about the exposed top and bottom sheets to be fastened. Bend line 16 forms a hinge enabling the fingers 20 and 22 to be pivoted towards each other.

The only portions of paper clip 10 which contact the paper are the facing sponge or foam surfaces forming a backing for gripping fingers 20 and 22. The use of resilient and compressible material as a backing is extremely important. The material 14, being resilient and compressible, will not leave an indentation or impression in the paper when paper clip 10 is clamped thereabout, but will be compressed. Thus, the paper will not be marked, marred, indented, or distorted. After removal of the clip from the fastened sheets, the resilient material will return to its original shape ready for use again. The resilient sponge or foam material together with the spring quality of the metal will also generate sufficient friction so as to prevent the fastened papers from slipping from the interior of paper clip 10.

A preferred material which has been found to have excellent characteristics as a backing for the paper clip is polyurethane foam. The resilience of the material enables the clip to withstand repeated use without wear.

The selection of an appropriate metal or other exterior structure material is also important. The material must have the proper thickness and temper to provide repeated use and bending at the hinge section without breaking. In addition, spring qualities of the metal must support sufficient compression of the foam or sponge backing.

A preferred metal for use in forming paper clip 10 is aluminum. Aluminum will not rust and its finished surface has been found to be ideal for writing upon. Therefore, notes can be made on the outer surfaces of clip 10, which is not possible with the conventional wire paper clip. It will also be noted that the lower edges 24 of gripping fingers 20 and 22 are arcuate throughout their length. This eliminates sharp corners on paper clip 10 which may scratch or mar the fastened paper.

FIG. 3 illustrates that the basic clip structure 10 can be modified by providing substantially centrally located holes 26 in each gripping finger 28, said holes being in substantial alignment. The clip structure can be clamped about the holes on looseleaf paper 30 and serve as reinforcement for the paper 30. The rings of a looseleaf binder will be inserted through the aligned holes 26 as well as the holes in paper 30.

FIG. 4 illustrates a clip structure generally designated by the numeral 40 which is identical in every respect to clip structure 10, except a tab 42 is struck from one of the gripping fingers and bent to a-substantiallyupright position. Tab 42 can serve as an indexing tab when clip structure 40 is clamped about a sheet of paper to quickly locate the particular sheet when other paper is positioned over it. The aluminum surface of clip 40 can be color coded to add to the indexing function of tab 42.

FIG. 5 illustrates a clip structure 50 identical in every respect to the clip reinforcement illustrated in FIG. 3 in that its gripping fingers are provided with substantially centrally located holes 52 in substantial alignment. Clip 50 can be clamped about a sheaf of looseleaf paper whose holes are in alignment and a conventional metal fastener 54 can be inserted through aligned openings 52 in clip structure 50 and the holes in the looseleaf papers to bind the papers together.

FIG. 6 illustrates a clip structure 60 identical in every respect to clip structure 10, except that the metal strip has a plurality of lateral corrugations 62 formed across its width after the foam or sponge cushion is secured to the metal strip. It has been found that the holding power of the clip can be substantially increased by a formation of corrugations or crimps in the metal strip. Depending upon the particular intended use of the clip structure, the corrugations can be longitudinal as shown on clip 70 in FIG. 8 or diagonal as shown on clip 80 in FIG. 9. In lieu of corrugations, the simple crimp in the metal strip will also increase the holding power of the clip structure.

A further use of the concepts disclosed in connection with clip 10 is illustrated in FIG. 10. FIG. 10 illustrates a clip structure generally designated by the numeral 90 which can be used as a clothes hanger or the like. Clip 90 is identical in every respect to clip 10, except a hook 92 is struck from one of the gripping fingers and bent to a substantially upright position. The width of the clip structure is also substantially elongated so that such garments as trousers and skirts can be gripped along their full width.

It will be apparent from the foregoing that a new type clip structure incorporating the use of the friction holding power of two separate materials has been disclosed which lends itself to a variety of applications, but will not mark, mar, indent, or distort the paper it fastens. The clip is simple to attach and does not require careful feeding or threading, like a wire clip. The flat metallic surface of the clip is conducive to color coding and writing which is not possible on a wire clip.

While the methods of this invention have been described in connection with a metal structure, it will be understood that the methods are applicable to any other types of material which when used with the sponge or foam backing provides adequate clip holding power for papenfastening purposes.

What is claimed is:

1. A clip structure comprising:

a pair of gripping fingers, each .of said fingers having an inner and outer surface and an upper and lower transverse edge,

hinge means connecting the upper edges of said gripping fingers, I

a resilient and compressible backing strip secured to the inner surface of each of said gripping fingers,

said gripping fingers being formed from a solid flat material,

said hinge means being a transverse bend line in said material substantially bisecting said strip, and

said resilient and compressible backing being a continuous strip.

2. The clip structure of claim 1 wherein said resilient and compressible backing is polyurethane foam.

3. A clip structure comprising: a pair of gripping fingers, each of said fingers having an inner and outer surface and an upper and lower transverse edge; hinge means connecting the upper edges of said gripping a resilient and compressible backing secured to the inner surface of each of said gripping fingers;

said gripping fingers being formed from a solid flat material;

said hinge means being a transverse bend line in said material substantially bisecting said material; and said resilient and compressible backing being substantially continuous.

4. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein a tab is struck from one of said gripping fingers and bent about said hinge means to a substantially upright position.

5. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein each of said fingers has a substantially centrally located opening therethrough, said openings being in substantial alignment.

6. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein the lowerv edges of said gripping fingers are arcuate throughout their length.

7. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein a hook is struck from one of said gripping fingers and bent about said hinge means to a substantially upright position.

8. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein said gripping fingers and resilient and compressible backing include a plurality of corrugations.

9. The clip structure of claim 3 wherein said resilient and compressible backing is polyurethane foam.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1256426 *May 23, 1914Feb 12, 1918Louis E BatzleyFiling binder-clip.
US2184569 *Jan 9, 1939Dec 26, 1939George B Graff CompanySignal or clip
US3398475 *Nov 7, 1966Aug 27, 1968Donald M. PalmerTag holding device
US3452976 *Oct 20, 1966Jul 1, 1969Ross Milton HPrinted circuit soldering aid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3913181 *Nov 29, 1973Oct 21, 1975Walker BrooksPaper clip having a coated inside loop surface
US4286358 *Dec 5, 1979Sep 1, 1981Levin Gary MPaper clip
US5084945 *Jun 29, 1990Feb 4, 1992Childers C LLockbox detent clip
US5212850 *Nov 12, 1991May 25, 1993In The PocketDevice for holding several leaves together
US5441509 *Nov 9, 1994Aug 15, 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyVessel clips
US5487746 *Nov 23, 1994Jan 30, 1996Yu; George W.Surgical clip having a longitudinal opening through which clamped tissue protrudes
US5697139 *Feb 16, 1996Dec 16, 1997Gaetke; Hubert J.Method for retaining partially rolled-up collapsible containers
US6393675 *Dec 15, 1997May 28, 2002Hubert J. GaetkeMethod and device for retaining partially rolled-up collapsible containers
US6521190 *May 19, 2000Feb 18, 2003Digene CorporationCell collection apparatus
US6536446 *Sep 10, 2001Mar 25, 2003Lucky Corporation Co., Ltd.Hair clip
US6668429 *May 3, 2002Dec 30, 2003Ykk Corporation Of AmericaDeep-groove fastener
US7040051Jul 2, 2004May 9, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyTabbed notes and flags
US7225570 *Jul 2, 2004Jun 5, 2007Windorski David CFold-over tabbed notes and flags
US7316421 *Apr 27, 2004Jan 8, 2008Bailey Debra AFile paper retainer and method
US8687191Dec 9, 2010Apr 1, 2014Deka Products Limited PartnershipDetection system and method for aerosol delivery
US8701588Jun 10, 2011Apr 22, 2014Franklin Mill, LlcBookmarks including coupling features and related methods
US8720750Nov 23, 2010May 13, 2014Nv Bekaert SaNon-slip metal wire clothes hanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/67.00R, 24/703.1, 402/500, 402/79, D19/65, 24/326
International ClassificationB42F3/00, B42F21/00, B42F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F15/0029, B42F21/00, Y10S402/50, B42F3/00
European ClassificationB42F21/00, B42F3/00, B42F15/00C2B2