Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3604627 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1971
Filing dateFeb 24, 1970
Priority dateFeb 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3604627 A, US 3604627A, US-A-3604627, US3604627 A, US3604627A
InventorsMiscovich John A, Warren Leondras A
Original AssigneeStang Hydronics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Monitor boom incorporating twin-jet nozzle apparatus
US 3604627 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent John A. Miscovich Flat, Alaska;

Leondras A. Warren, Whittier, Calif. 13,349

Feb. 24, 1970 Sept. 14, 1971 Stang l-lydronics Inc.

Orange, Calif.

Inventors Appl. No. Filed Patented Assignee MONITOR BOOM INCORPORATING TWIN-JET NOZZLE APPARATUS 1 1 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

U.S. Cl 239/166, 239/587 Int. Cl B05b 15/08 Field of Search 239/159,

up; a

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,919,072 12/1959 Corley, Jr. 239/587 X 2,986,344 5/1961 Knight 239/587 3,074,649 1/1963 Atkinson 239/587 X Primary ExaminervM. Henson Wood, Jr. Assistant Examiner-Michael Y. Mar An0rneyGausewitz & Carr ABSTRACT: A remotely controlled twin-jet monitor apparatus is mounted on the end of an articulated water-con PATENTED SEPI 4197\ 3.604627 sum 2 OF 2 gamma A w/wem arm aways.

MONITOR BOOM IN CORPORATING TWIN-JET NOZZLE APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to the field of hydraulic monitors or giants for use in firefighting, mining, slurrying, etc. More particularly, this invention relates to the mounting of monitor apparatus on the ends of booms or arms.

2. Description of the Prior Art Large, hydraulic nozzle apparatus, or monitors, have previously been mounted or used on the ends of booms for firefighting or other purposes. However, it has not heretofore been practical to direct the jet laterally relative to the end of the boom. This is because a large reaction torque is created about the vertical axis of the boom, thus necessitating excessively strong and heavy mast or boom constructions and/or powerful and expensive actuating apparatus. There exists a distinct need for a boom-monitor apparatus from which jets may be laterally directed, which may be very large yet light in weight and inexpensive, and which may be readily retracted for transportation through the streets or elsewhere. It is highly important that the jets be rotatable.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, two monitors are mounted at the boom end. Remote-operated means are provided to pivot the monitors in opposite directions and through equal angles, in such manner that no resultant reaction torque is created about the vertical axis or mast of the boom. Means are provided to effect conjoint rotation of the monitors about a common axis at the boom end, again without creating any resultant torque about the mast. In addition, means are provided to direct the jets downwardly, the resultant upward thrust being largely compensated for by the weight of the boom.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an enlarged top plan view of the monitor portion of the apparatus;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged elevational view of such monitor portion;

FIG. 3 is a view, primarily in elevation, showing the boom in retracted condition;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the showing of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is an elevational view showing, the boom and monitors in various extended positions.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring first to FIG. 1, the twin-jet monitor portion of the firefighting (or mining) apparatus includes two identical nozzles 11 and 11a. Such nozzles are connected, respectively, to tubular sinuous members 12 and 12a which, in turn, are associated with swivel joints l3 and 13a (respectively). The two swivel joints 13 and 13a have large outer bearing elements 14 (FIG. 2) which are rigidly connected to the ends of the arms of a T-shaped member 15. The stem of the T-shaped member 15 is connected by a swivel joint 16 to a secondary boom member 17 The sinuous member 12 includes a reversely bent tubular portion which extends upwardly as viewed in FIG. 2. In complementary or conjugate manner, sinuous member 12a has a reversely bent portion which extends downwardly as viewed in such figure. This permits the swivel joints 13 and 13a to have a common axis which is designated A in FIG. 1.

A predetermined generally horizontal or inclined plane which is perpendicular to the common axis of swivel joints l3 and 13a, and which contains the axis of swivel joint 16, also contains the axes of nozzles 1 l and 1 1a. Also, the axes of nozzles l1 and 11a intersect the axis A. Such noule axes additionally intersect the axis of swivel joint l6.

To achieve the relationships specified in the preceding paragraph, the respective sinuous members 12 and 12a are formed with elbow portions 18 and 18a bent at obtuse angles as best shown in FIG. 1.

The described relationships create conditions such that the nozzles cannot create any torques about the common axis A of joints l3 and 13a, nor about the axis of joint 16. As will be set forth below, the conditions are also caused to be such that no resultant torque is created about the vertical axis or mast of the entire boom apparatus.

Swivel joints 13 and 13a are powered by fluid motors 22 and 22a which are mounted on the associated outer bearing elements 14. Each of the fluid motors 22 and 22a includes a worm gear and associated worm wheel adapted to effect relative rotation between elements 14 and end portions of members l2 and 12a. Since the axes of the nozzles intersect the common axis A of swivel joints 13-1311, so that there is no torsional force about such axis A despite the reaction of the fluid discharged from the nozzles, the motors 22 and 22a may be very small and inexpensive.

Motor 22 is operated by introducing fluid through a conduit 23 and withdrawing such fluid through a conduit 24. Motor 22a is operated by introducing the fluid through such conduit 24 and withdrawing the fluid through a conduit 25. The motors 22 and 22a are thus in series with each other, and each motor is constructed the same as the other. Therefore, the motors and associated swivel joints always operate simultaneously through equal angles.

Very importantly, the motors 22 and 22a are so connected that the sinuous members 12 and 12a rotate in opposite directions about the common axis A of swivel joints 13 and 13a, as indicated in phantom lines in FIG. 1. Thus, when one of the nozzles 11 is moved away from a predetermined vertical plane containing axis A, and also containing the axis of swivel joint 16, the other nozzle 11a moves (in the opposite direction) an equal amount relative to such plane. This counter pivotal movement of sinuous members 12 and 12a equalizes the side or lateral reaction forces of the fluid which is discharged from the nozzles. Stated otherwise, the side reaction forces (those forces perpendicular to the specified vertical plane) are equal and counterbalanced (the nozzles 11 and 111: corresponding to each other, and discharging the same volume of fluid).

The only resultant reaction force from fluid discharged through the twin-jet monitor portion 10 is one which is coaxial with the longitudinal axis of swivel joint 16. Therefore, the power means to rotate the twin-jet monitor portion 10 about the axis of swivel joint 16 does not need to be powerful or expensive.

Swivel joint 16 is powered by a fluid motor 28 which is rigidly positioned on the outer bearing element 29 of the swivel joint. The fluid motor 28 is operated in one direction by introducing fluid into the motor through a conduit 30 and withdrawing such fluid through a conduit 31.

A pair of conduits 34 and 35 are attached to the outer bearing element 29 of swivel joint 16, and communicate (respectively) with conduits 23 and 25. The connection between conduit 34 and conduit 23, and the connection between conduit 35 and conduit 25, are the same as described in my copending patent application Ser. No. 755,919, filed Aug. 28, 1969, for an Improved Power-Operated and Manually-Operated Swivel- Joint Means, and Hydraulic Monitor Incorporating the Same.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4, the above-indicated secondary boom member 17 has a looped end portion 50 which is associated with a swivel joint 51. The swivel joint 51 is, in turn, associated with the elbowed end portion 52 of a primary boom member 53. The axis of swivel joint 16 is perpendicular to and intersects the axis of swivel joint 51.

Since (as above stated) the reactant force of the twin-jet monitor portion 10 is resolved into an axial force along the axis of swivel joint 16, and since the axis of swivel joint 16 intersects the axis of swivel joint 51, the reactant force of the twin-jet monitor 10 does not produce any torsional force about the axis of swivel joint 51. Therefore, the means used to pivot the secondary boom member 17 about the axis of swivel joint 51 does not need to be powerful.

Swivel joint 51 is power-operated by a cylinder 54 one end of which is pivotallyattached to a bracket 55 on the primary boom member 53. The piston rod 56 of such cylinder is pivotally attached to a bracket 58 on loop 50 of secondary boom member 17. Conduits 59 and 60 effect operation of cylinder 54 in order to pivot the monitor apparatus downwardly relative to the position shown in FIG. 3, or to return toward such position. Preferably, for reasons set forth below, the monitor apparatus is not pivoted upwardly from the FIG. 3 position (in which position a plane containing nozzles 12 and 124 also contains primary boom member 53).

The primary boom member 53 includes a looped portion 67 which is associated with a swivel joint 68. The swivel joint 68 is associated with an elbowed end portion 69 of a secondary mast member 70. The axis of swivel joint 68 is perpendicular to and intersects the longitudinal centerline of the secondary mast member 70. As shown in FIG. 4, a vertical plane which passes through the longitudinal centerline of boom member 53 also passes through the longitudinal centerline of secondary mast member 70.

The swivel joint 68 is power-operated by means similar to that which operates swivel joint 51. A cylinder 73 is pivotally attached to a bracket 74 on the secondary mast member 70. A piston rod 75, which is connected to the piston 76 in the cylinder 73, is pivotally attached to a bracket 77 on the looped end portion 67 of primary boom member 53. The cylinder 73 is operated by introducing fluid through conduit 78 and withdrawing fluid through conduit 79, or vice versa.

Secondary mast member 70 includes a looped portion 84 which is associated with a swivel joint 85, as best shown in FIG. 4. The swivel joint 85 is associated with an elbowed end portion 86 of a primary mast 87. The axis of swivel joint 85 is perpendicular to and intersects the longitudinal centerline of secondary mast member 70, and also the longitudinal centerline of primary mast 87.

The swivel joint 85 is power-operated by a cylinder 91, one end of which is pivotally attached to a bracket 92 secured on the primary mast 87. The piston rod 93 of cylinder 91 is pivotally attached to a bracket 95 on the secondary mast member 70. Cylinder 91 is actuated by introducing fluid through conduit 96 and withdrawing fluid through conduit 97, or vice versa.

The primary mast 87 is rotatably supported in upper and lower bearings and 102, and is associated with a swivel joint 103 which connects the mast member 87 to a fluid supply conduit 104. Swivel joint 103 is power-operated by a fluid motor 105 driving a gear means 106 which, in turn, engages a gear wheel 107 mounted on the primary mast 87.

The upper bearing member 101 is positioned near the top of the vehicle 110, as shown in FIG. 5. The lower bearing member 102 is positioned near the base of the vehicle 110 in order to provide stability for the primary mast 87.

This apparatus also includes a rest member 112 positioned on the vehicle 110, and which supports the secondary mast member 70 when the apparatus is in its retracted condition shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. Positioned on the primary mast 87 is a second rest member 113 which supports the forward end of the primary boom member 53 when the apparatus is in retracted condition.

OPERATION When the rod 93 in cylinder 91 is fully extended, the secondary mast 70 is pivoted about swivel joint 85 until the longitudinal centerline of the secondary mast member is coaxial with the longitudinal centerline of primary mast 87, as shown in FIG. 5.

When the rod 75 in cylinder 73 is fully extended, the primary boom member 53 is moved from its initial position parallel tosecondary mast member 70 to the extended position shown in FIG. 5. Alternatively, the cylinder 73 may be only partially extended, resulting in the primary boom member 53 being positioned (for example) as shown in dashed lines in FIG. 5. Primary boom 53 may be pivoted horizontally through use of motor 105, and gear means 106-107, FIG. 3.

Regardless of the position of the primary boom 53, the secondary boom member 17 may be rotated about swivel joint 51 in order to direct the twin-jet apparatus 10 in the desired direction. A few of the possible configurations are shown in FIG. 5. As previously indicated, the noules I1 and 11a are normally directed generally coaxially or downwardly relative to the axis of boom member 53. This provides the advantage that the reactions from the jets never adds excessively to the weight of member 53, whereby such member (and associated members) may be light in weight. Normally, the jets are downwardly directed, so that the reaction forces decrease the effective weight of member 53.

As described in detail above, the angular positions of nozzles 11 and 11a relative to the predetermined vertical plane containing the axis of swivel joint 16, and also containing the common axis A (FIG. 1) of joints l3 and 13a, are always such that the torques generated by the jets neutralize or cancel each other. This is true not only relative to torques about such axes, but also about the axis of primary mast 87. The moment arm of nozzle 11 relative to the axis of mast 87 is always the same as that of nozzle 11a relative thereto. Since the jet volumes are the same, and the jets are always so directed as to create opposite torques relative to such axis, it follows that there is no resultant torque about the mast. Motor and gear elements -107 may therefore be small.

To state the above in another manner, it is emphasized that the net reaction force of twin-jet apparatus 10 is (as stated above) always aligned with the longitudinal axis of swivel joint 16. Referring to FIG. 4, the axis of swivel joint 16 intersects the extended axis of the primary mast 87. The twin-jet nozzle apparatus 10 may therefore, as set forth above, discharge fluid without transmitting any torsional force to primary mast 87 It is pointed out that the above-specified vertical plane containing axis A, and also containing the axis of swivel joint 16, further contains the axis of mast 87.

Firefighting fluid is introduced into the apparatus through the fluid supply conduit 104. The fluid passes through the primary mast 87, into the secondary mast member 70, through the primary boom member 53, into the secondary boom member 17, through the T-shaped member 15, into the sinuous members 12 and 12a, and out through the two discharge nozzles 11 and 11a. As shown in FIG. 5, the apparatus 10 may be placed in a large number of positions and pointed in a large number of directions. The apparatus discharges two streams of fluid which may be closely aligned or widely divergent.

The apparatus, when in its retracted position as shown in FIG. 3, may easily be transported on a firetruck or similar land-based vehicle 1 10. The apparatus is easily transported to the site of the fire, where the secondary mast member 70 is pivoted to its upright position as shown in FIG. 5. The primary boom member 53 and the secondary boom member 17 may then be positioned so as to most advantageously discharge fluid directly onto the source of the fire. The swivel joint 16 may be continuously rotated in order to periodically discharge fluid onto a given area.

If the fire is in a room in (for example) an upper story of a building, and the twin-jet apparatus 10 is inserted through a window in such room, this device may discharge fluid onto many areas of the room by pivoting the discharge nozzles 11 and 11a to the widely divergent positions shown in phantom in FIG. 1, and continuously rotating the twin-jet device 10 about the axis of swivel joint 16. When the nozzles 11 and 11a are generally horizontal, the twin-jet apparatus 10 will discharge water toward both sides of the room. When the discharge noz zles 11 and 11a are generally vertical, the twin-jet apparatus 10 will discharge water toward the ceiling and toward the floor. The rate of rotation about swivel joint 16, and the angular positions of discharge nozzles l 1 and 1 1a, may be varied as necessary to thoroughly saturate many areas of the room. Such saturation occurs without ever imparting a buckling or twisting moment to any part of the apparatus.

The apparatus may be positioned on a fireboat as well as on a land-based vehicle. It may also be permanently positioned in areas of high fire danger where an elevated discharge position is desirable in order to most effectively fight any fire that might occur.

The apparatus is also highly useful as an aid in phosphate mining, slurry production, etc. lt is able to discharge a pair of high-pressure jets of water directly downwardly onto any given part of a large area. Very importantly, the apparatus is able (by use of swivel joint 16) to generate a mixing action as desired. The apparatus may be positioned on a movable base or sled so that it may easily be moved from one area to another.

We claim:

1. A twin-jet monitor apparatus, which comprises:

support means,

first and second nozzle means movably mounted on said support means,

said first nozzle means being so directed that the reaction force resulting from discharge of fluid therefrom generates a torque in one direction about a predetermined axis,

said second nozzle means being so directed that the reaction force resulting from discharge of fluid therefrom generates a second torque about said axis and which is oppositely directed relative to said first-mentioned torque,

means to supply fluid to said nozzle means for discharge therethrough, and

first and second actuating means connected, respectively, to

said nozzle means to move the same relative to said support means,

said first and second actuating means being so correlated to each other, and said first and second nozzle means being so correlated to each other, that said first-mentioned and second torques substantially cancel each other regardless of the positions of said first and second nozzle means relative to said support means, whereby there is substantially no torque about said axis resulting from said reaction forces.

2. The invention as claimed in claim 1, in which said first nozzle means is a single nozzle of predetermined size, in which said second nozzle means is a single nozzle of the same predetermined size, in which said fluid supply means is connected to supply equal volumes of fluid to said first-mentioned and second-mentioned nozzles, and in which means are provided to operate said first and second actuating means in such manner that the angle of said first-mentioned nozzle relative to a predetermined plane containing said predetermined axis is always equal to the angle of said second-mentioned nozzle relative to said plane, said nozzles being on opposite sides of said plane.

3. The invention as claimed in claim 2, in which said nozzles lie in the same plane.

4. The invention as claimed in claim 3, in which said support means and said fluid supply means include a swivel joint through which fluid is fed to both of said nozzles, the axis of said swivel joint lying in said predetermined plane.

5. The invention as claimed in claim 4, in which means are provided to effect conjoint rotation of said nozzles about said swivel joint axis.

6. The invention as claimed in claim 5, in which said support means is a large articulated boom having said nozzle means at the free end thereof, in which said boom is connected to a vertical mast, in which said predetermined axis is coincident with the axis of said mast, and in which means are provided to rotate said mast about said predetermined axis.

7. A twin-jet monitor apparatus, which comprises:

a T-shaped conduit,

first and second swivel joints mounted at the ends of the arms of said conduit and coaxially of each other, a third swivel joint mounted at the end of the stem of said conduit,

the axis of said third swivel joint being perpendicular to and intersecting the common axis of said first and second swivel joints,

a first connector conduit extending from said first swivel joint to a first nozzle,

a second connector conduit extending from said second swivel joint to a second nozzle,

said first and second nozzles having the same shape and flow capacity,

the axes of said nozzles lying in a plane which contains said axis of said third swivel joint,

said axes of said nozzles perpendicularly intersecting said common axis of said first and second swivel joints,

motor means to rotate said T-shaped conduit about said third swivel joint,

motor means to rotate said first connector conduit about said first swivel joint,

motor means to rotate said second connector conduit about said second swivel joint,

means to operate said motor means for said first and second connector conduits in such manner that said axes of said first and second nozzles always lie at equal angles to a second plane perpendicular to said first-mentioned plane and containing said axis of said third swivel joint,

said first and second nozzles lying on opposite sides of said second plane and extending generally forwardly from said third swivel joint, and

connector conduits to vary in conjugate manner the angles of said nozzles relative to said second plane.

8. The invention as claimed in claim 7, in which each of said first and second connector conduits has a portion which extends away from said axis of said third swivel joint and along said common axis of said first and second swivel joints.

9. The invention as claimed in claim 7, in which water supply means are provided to feed water at high flow rates to said third swivel joint and thus to said first and second swivel joints, said supply means and said conduits being such that the flow volume of water through said first swivel joint is equal to the flow volume of water through said second swivel joint.

10. The invention as claimed in claim 7, in which said third swivel joint is connected at the end of a long boom conduit which, in turn, is connected to a mast conduit.

11. The invention as claimed in claim 10, in which said boom conduit is pivotally connected to said mast conduit, in which said axis of said third swivel joint intersects the axis of said mast conduit, and in which means are provided to rotate said mast conduit about its axis.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2919072 *Jun 24, 1957Dec 29, 1959Jr John T CorleyCellar pipe
US2986344 *Jul 23, 1959May 30, 1961Chiksan CoHydraulic monitor
US3074649 *Mar 23, 1961Jan 22, 1963Atkinson Duane ESpraying apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3913836 *May 1, 1974Oct 21, 1975Stevenson James SSpray rig assembly
US4007793 *Aug 25, 1975Feb 15, 1977Hux Fred MFire fighting apparatus
US4027433 *Sep 17, 1975Jun 7, 1977Wayne HockettSand blasting apparatus
US4126970 *Dec 1, 1976Nov 28, 1978Hockett Wayne BAbrasive cleaning apparatus
US4139970 *Dec 1, 1976Feb 20, 1979Hockett Wayne BAbrasive cleaning apparatus
US4545156 *Apr 26, 1984Oct 8, 1985Hockett Wayne BUniversal abrasive cleaning apparatus
US5319893 *Nov 9, 1992Jun 14, 1994Hockett Wayne BRecovery system
US5489234 *Jul 26, 1993Feb 6, 1996Sandroid Systems, Inc.Enhanced recovery system
US6010080 *May 26, 1995Jan 4, 2000Plamondon Campquip LteeMultiple function mobile device for handling equipment
US7611075 *Aug 10, 2005Nov 3, 2009Relyea Robert GExtensible aerial boom having two independently operated fluid nozzles
US7726613Feb 8, 2006Jun 1, 2010Park Technologies, L.L.C.Water blast gun support apparatus and methods
US9186531 *Apr 15, 2010Nov 17, 2015Elkhart Brass Manufacturing Company, Inc.Fire fighting monitor
US20060260823 *Feb 8, 2006Nov 23, 2006Burnier Timothy AWater blast gun support apparatus and methods
US20070034389 *Aug 10, 2005Feb 15, 2007Crash Rescue Equipment Service, Inc.Extensible aerial boom having two independently operated fluid nozzles
US20070148024 *Dec 22, 2005Jun 28, 2007Scott WuPump
US20110253397 *Oct 20, 2011Elkhart Brass Manufacturing Company, Inc.Fire fighting monitor
USRE30289 *May 11, 1978Jun 3, 1980 Sand blasting apparatus
WO1983003071A1 *Mar 1, 1983Sep 15, 1983Hockett, Wayne, B.Universal cleaning apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/166, 239/587.2
International ClassificationE21C25/60, E21C25/00, A62C31/00, A62C31/24
Cooperative ClassificationE21C25/60, A62C31/24
European ClassificationA62C31/24, E21C25/60