Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3605069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1971
Filing dateMay 26, 1969
Priority dateMay 26, 1969
Also published asDE2025821A1, DE2025821B2, DE2025821C3
Publication numberUS 3605069 A, US 3605069A, US-A-3605069, US3605069 A, US3605069A
InventorsDorrell Robert F
Original AssigneeBunker Ramo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rigid electrical connector
US 3605069 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Robert F. Dorrell Des Plaines, Ill. [21] Appl. No. 827,811 [22] Filed May 26, 1969 [45] Patented Sept. 14,1971 [73] Assignee The Bunker-Rama: Corporation Oak Brook, Ill.

[54] RIGID ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR 20 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 339/90 R, 285/169, 285/354, 285/361, 339/94 M [51] Int. Cl H01r 13/54 [50] Field of Search 339/89, 90, 94; 285/169, 354, 361

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,092,135 9/1937 Parker 285/169 2,497,987 2/1950 Goode 285/122 2,690,345 9/1954 Anstine a 285/169 2,700,140 1/1955 Phillips. 339/94 M 2,731,610 l/l956 Thacker 339/89 Primary Examiner-Joseph H. McGlynn Attorney-Frederick M. Arbuckle ABSTRACT: A connector which is adapted to maintain a substantially airtight seal between mating faces of a connector plug and receptacle by substantially preventing any relative movement between these elements. The connection is performed through two means, the first of which is effective to loosely couple the plug and receptacle, and the second of which is effective to force the forward faces of insulating blocks in each of the elements against each other under pressure to cause a compression of at least one of the blocks resulting in the desired seal. The compression of a block also provides a rigid connection which is resistant to movement under conditions of stress, shock and vibration. The resistance to movement may be enhanced by terminating the coupling in a metal-to-metal bottoming of the plug and receptacle shells.

PATENTEU SEP1 41971 SHEET 2 OF 3 HELIX ANGLE PATENTED SEP] 4197:

SHEET 3 0F 3 RIGID ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR A RIGID ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Th invention relates to electrical connectors and more particulaily to an electrical connector which is adapted to maintain a substantially airtight seal between mating faces of the connector plug and receptacle by substantially preventing any relative movement between these elements under conditions of stress, shock or vibration.

One type of connector presently employed to interconnect two wires or two cables utilizes a bayonet pin on the receptacle shell which mates with a sin gle-stage cam on the plug. This type of connector may be coupled quickly and easily, requiring only about a 120 rotation of a coupling ring with a minimum of torque, and also provides reasonable protection against the connection being opened as a result of stress, shock or vibration.

However, since the bayonet pin and cam cause a relatively large movement of the plug into the receptacle for each degree of rotation of the coupling ring, this type of coupling is capable of generating little power. As a result, the operator must supply substantial torque in situations where compression of an insulator is desired in order to achieve an interfaeial seal. Also, since pressure is applied over a small pin and track area, attempts to form a pressure seal with this type of coupling results in excessive wear and possible shearing of the pin and in mushrooming of the cam track.

However, if a high-pressure interfaeial seal is not achieved between the insulators of the plug and receptacle, moisture may get into the contacts causing shorting and other problems. An airtight seal between the plug and receptacle is even more essential when the connector is used in airborne equipment or other equipment which is called upon to operate at varying altitudes. Corona starting and extinguishing voltages are known to vary with the ambient air pressure and to decrease with moisture. Since a corona discharge can cause signal-destroying noise on the line and can fatigue or destroy connector insulation, it is important that the corona-starting voltage in the connector be maintained well above the voltage on the lines feeding the connector. A good interfacial seal in the connector prevents the pressure of the air trapped in the connector from varying regardless of the external pressure, and keeps moisture out of the connector. This assures that, so long as voltage levels in the connector do not exceed ground level ratings, a corona voltage will not develop in the connectOl'.

With a bayonet coupling alone, it is difficult to achieve an effective interfaeial seal and the seal may be lost when the wires or cables are abruptly subjected to axial or rotational stress. Movement between the plug and receptacle shell, and thus loss of interfacial seal, may also occur during shock or vibration. In addition to the loss of interfacial seal, such movement could cause undesirable contact noise on the lines and could also cause excessive contact wear and erosion. Excessive wear reduces the life of the connector. This, in addition to the variations in the corona starting and extinguishing voltages, could lead to erroneous operation, or even loss of operation, in the equipment serviced by the wires.

From the above it is apparent that, particularly in such applications as in airborne and other mobile equipment, where connectors are subjected to variations in ambient pressure, and where connectors are subjected to stress, shock, and vibration, an improved electrical connector is required. This connector should be capable of providing an airtight interfacial seal between the plug and receptacle and should be rigid so as to prevent any relative movement between these two elements. However, it should still be possible to couple the plug and receptacle both quickly and easily. Another desirable, but not absolutely necessary, feature is that the modifications to the connector be restricted to, for example, the plug and that the modified plug be capable of operating with existing receptacles. This latter feature would minimize manufacturing and design costs as well as reducing the cost of any required field changes.

It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide an improved electrical connector.

A more specific object of this invention is to provide a connector with an airtight interfaeial seal between the plug and receptacle so as to prevent changes in the corona starting and extinguishing potential from occuring in the connector when the connector is subjected to variations in ambient pressure such as are caused by changes in altitude. Another more specific object of this invention is to provide a rigid electrical connector which minimizes relative movement, and thus prevents loss of interfacial seal, between the plug and receptacle under conditions of stress, shock and vibration.

Another object of this invention is to provide a rigid electrical connector of the type described above, the plug and receptacle of which may be coupled both quickly and easily.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a rigid, airtight connector of the type described above, where all modifications are made only in the plug so that existing receptacles may still be utilized.

In accordance with the above objects this invention provides a connector formed of a plug having a shell and a receptacle having a shell. The plug has a coupling ring which is mounted for rotation on the plug shell. A first coupling means is provided which is adapted, when the ring is rotated, to loosely couple the plug and receptacle. This first means may, for example, be the usual bayonet pin and cam, described above. Each shell has a block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in it with each of the blocks having a forward face. The two forward faces are positioned parallel to each other when the plug and receptacle are loosely coupled. At least one of the blocks is of a compressible material. A second coupling means is also provided which is adapted to complete the coupling of the plug and receptacle. The second coupling means is effective to force the forward faces of the insulating material blocks against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the block which is formed of a compressible material. This results in the forming of a rigid and substantially airtight interfaeial seal. The second coupling means may, for example be a conventional screw thread which causes the plug shell to be advanced relative to the coupling ring. In a preferred embodiment of the invention means are provided for inhibiting the action of the second coupling means until the action of the first coupling means has been completed. The combination described above has the advantage of the bayonet coupling in that most of the coupling may be accomplished quickly and easily while the screw thread provides the pressure required for achieving an effective interfaeial seal with a relatively small amount of torque applied to the coupling ring. Further rigidity may be obtained by terminating the second coupling action with a metal-tometal bottoming of the shell forward faces.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more par ticular description of preferred embodiments of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a cutaway diagram of a portion of the connector of a preferred embodiment of the invention showing the plug and receptacle in an uncoupled condition.

FIG. 2 is a cutaway diagram showing the plug and receptacle of FIG. 1 in a partially coupled condition.

FIG. 3 is a cutaway diagram showing the plug and receptacle of FIG. 1 in a fully coupled condition.

FIG. 4 is a section view of the receptacle of the preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a diagram of the can utilized in a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a cutaway diagram of a portion of the connector of an alternative embodiment of the invention showing the plug and receptacle in a coupled condition.

Referring now to FIG. 1, it is seen that the connector is formed of a receptacle l and a plug 12. Receptacle 10 includes a shell 14 having a bayonet pin 16. The receptacle also includes a block 18 of insulating material having a forward face 19 and one or more female terminals 20 positioned therein. In the embodiment of the invention shown, block 18 is of an uncompressible material. An opening 21 is provided between shell 14 and insulator block 18 in which, as will be seen shortly, the plug shell is adapted to fit. The shell has a keyslot 22 formed in it at a point adjacent to opening 21 and a sealing gasket 24 of O-ring type is also provided. Referring to FIG. 4 it is seen that insulator block 18 can in fact house a plurality of female terminals 20 which lead to an output cable (not shown). While there is only a single keyslot 22, there are three bayonet pins 16 uniformly positioned around the periphery of the shell.

Referring now to plug 12, it is seen that it includes a plurality of terminal pins 26 (only one of which is shown in the figure) embedded in and projecting from the front face 27 of a block of insulating material 28. There is a terminal pin 26 corresponding to each female terminal 20. Block 28 will, for the embodiment of the invention shown, be assumed to be of a compressible (elastic) material. It should be understood, however, that block 18 could be of a compressible material and block 28 of an incompressible material, or both blocks could be formed of a compressible material. A plug shell 30 surrounds block 28. A coupling ring 32 is secured against longitudinal motion on shell 30 by track-ring 34 which rides in channels 36 and 38. Ring 32 is however free to rotate relative to shell 30. An internal screw thread 40 on ring 32 mates with an external screw thread 42 on bayonet sleeve 44. Bayonet sleeve 44 has three helical cam tracks 46 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 1), one for each of the pins 16 shown in FIG. 4.

Referring now to FIG. 5, it is seen that each of the tracks 46 provides a path which angles at l--30' for a distance equal to 60 around the internal circumference of the bayonet sleeve. At 60, a seat 48 is provided with the cam track having a 30 angle beyond the seat. The function of this last design feature will be described shortly.

Bayonet sleeve 44 has a groove 50 which is adapted to receive a stud 52 of a coupling sleeve 54. The other end of stud 52 fits into a groove 56 in coupling ring 32. Coupling sleeve 54 is thus effective to lock the coupling ring and the bayonet sleeve together so that they rotate as a unit. Stud 54 is biased into groove 50 by return spring 58. As may be seen from the exploded portion 60 of FIG. 2, the left surface of stud 52 and the right surface (outside groove 50) of bayonet sleeve 44 are knurled surfaces. The function of these knurled surfaces will be described shortly.

In operation, receptacle and plug 12 are initially positioned as shown in FIG. 1 with key 31 in keyslot 22 and each of the bayonet pins 16 in a corresponding cam groove 46. Coupling ring 32 is then rotated (counterclockwise when looking in the direction of FIG. 4). Since bayonet sleeve 44 is fixed to coupling ring 32 by stud 52 of coupling sleeve 54, bayonet sleeve 44 also rotates relative to pin 16 causing each pin 16 to move along a respective cam groove 46. This results in plug 12 being drawn into receptacle 10. Part way through this operation the leading edge of receptacle shell 14 contacts the leading edge of coupling sleeve 54. From this point on, further advance of the plug into the receptacle cause coupling sleeve 54 to be moved backward relative to bayonet sleeve 44 against the action of return spring 58.

When 60 of rotation of the coupling ring 32 have been completed, bayonet pins 16 are seated in seats 48 of cam tracks 46 (see FIG. 5) and the elements are positioned as shown in FIG. 2. From this figure it can be seen that stud 52 of coupling sleeve 54 is now removed from groove 50. This permits the coupling ring and coupling sleeve to rotate relative to the bayonet sleeve.

During the remaining rotation of coupling ring 32, which may, for example, be another 60, threads 40 and 42 coact to drive plug shell 30 further into receptacle 10. As may be seen from FIGS. 2 and 3, most of this movement results in a compression in length of insulator block 28 by an amount (L). If both blocks 18 and 28 are formed of a compressible material, then both blocks will be deformed, while if one of these blocks is formed of an incompressible material, then only the other will be compressed. The compression of the insulator block results in a high-pressure interfacial seal which is airtight and watertight and is highly resistant to any motion between the plug and receptacle due to stress, shock or vibration. Further sealing, particularly against moisture, is achieved through the deforming of O-ring gasket 24. As may be seen in FIG. 3, the coupling action terminates in a metal-to-metal butt joint between the leading edge of plug shell 30 and receptacle shell 14. This metal-to-metal butt joint enhances the rigidity of the connector.

The knurled surfaces between bayonet sleeve 44 and coupling sleeve 54 (see insert 60 of FIG. 2) are held together under pressure by means of return spring 58. The mating of these surfaces serves to lock the coupled elements in place. This lock is designed to be resistant to vibration and shock.

Since the three bayonet pins 16 are seated for the final 60 of rotation, the lead edge of the cam track, and the bayonet pin, are not subjected to the high forces required to compress the insulating material blocks. Thus, mushroom effect on the cam tracks is minimized. If a proper seating is designed, seizing as a result of repeated mating can be avoided.

The 30 helix angle in the cam track beyond the seat position 48 insures that the bayonet pins 16 will fall into the seat and, at the same time, allows larger production tolerances for the coupling sleeve release mechanism.

When it is desired to uncouple receptacle 10 and plug 12, coupling ring 32 is rotated in the opposite direction. Since coupling sleeve 54 is keyed to coupling ring 32, this causes the coupling sleeve to also rotate with the knurled surfaces shown in insert 60 riding over each other. When stud 52 reaches a position adjacent to groove 50, a stop is provided to prevent the stud from moving any further. Return spring 58 forces stud 52 into groove 50. Continued rotation of coupling ring 32 causes bayonet sleeve 44 to also be rotated. This results in pins 16 moving through grooves 46 to cam the plug and receptacles out of contact with each other.

A connector has thus been provided which permits a rigid, airtight and water tight connection with insulator compression and metal-to-metal bottoming of the shells. This is accomplished with only a rotation of a coupling ring. Since a low-angle screw thread is utilized to perform the compression operation, the torque required for this operation is not excessrve.

FIG. 6 shows an alternative embodiment of the invention which is substantially simpler, and therefore cheaper and less bulky, than that shown in FIGS. 1-3. The primary difference in this embodiment of the invention is that the coupling action as a result of the bayonet pin and cam, and the coupling action resulting from the screw thread are performed concurrently rather than sequentially. This increases the torque required to effect the connection, but permits the use of a plug having only two rather than four parts.

Referring to FIG. 6, it is seen that like numbers have been used for like elements in FIGS. 13 and FIG. 6. Receptacle 10 is substantially the same for both embodiments. It includes a shell 14 having a bayonet pin 16 and a keyslot 22 formed in it, and a block of insulating material 18 which is adapted to have a plurality of female terminals 20.

Plug 12 still has a shell 30 having a key 31 formed on it and a block of insulating material 28, having terminals pins 26 mounted therein. Shell 30 has an external screw thread 70 formed on it which thread mates with an internal thread 72 of a bayonet coupling ring 74. Bayonet coupling ring 74 has a plurality of cam tracks 46 formed in it (only one of which is shown in FIG. 6) which tracks correspond in number to the number of pins 16 (three for the illustrated embodiments of the invention). The cam tracks may be of the type shown in FIG. 5. The torque required to effect coupling with a connector of the type shown in FIG. 6 may be reduced by extending cam track 46 for 120 rather than for 60 thus permitting the cam angle to be reduced. Bayonet coupling ring 74 is captivated on shell 30 by retainer ring 76. Ring 74 is rotated on shell 30 against the action of torsion spring 78.

ln operation, receptacle l and plug 12 of FIG. 6 are fitted together much as is shown in FIG. 1 with key 31 in key slot 22 and bayonet pins 16 in corresponding cam tracks 46. At this time ring 74 is held against retainer ring 76 by the action of spring 7 8. Ring 74 is then rotated causing the plug and receptacle to be coupled due to the joint action of the bayonet pins and screw thread 70-14 72. The coupling is completed as shown in FIG. 6 when the pins 16 reach the end of cam tracks 46 and screw thread 72 reaches the end of screw thread 70. The pressure of the interfacial seal results in a metal-to-metal butt joint on the threads 70 and 72 providing additional rigidity and locking the elements against becoming uncoupled. When it is desired to uncouple the elements, ring 74 is rotated in the opposite direction from that in which it was rotated for coupling.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the foregoing and other changes may be made in the nature and relationship of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A connector formed of a plug and a receptacle each of which has a shell comprising:

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said plug shell;

first coupling means responsive to the initial rotation of said coupling ring to coact with said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated to loosely couple said plug and said receptacle; block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, said plug and receptacle each having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of compressible material; and

second coupling means responsive to the continued rotation of said coupling ring to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said second coupling means being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the blocks of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal, said second coupling means being adapted to advance said plug into said receptacle a relatively short distance for each degree of rotation of said coupling ring, whereby the compression of said block is achieved without requiring the application of substantial torque to said coupling ring.

2. A connector of the type described in claim 1 wherein said second coupling means is operative when said coupling ring is rotated past the point where said loose coupling has been effected.

3. A connector of the type described in claim 1 wherein said second coupling means terminates in the bottoming of said plug and receptacle shells.

4. A connector formed of a plug and a receptacle each of which has a shell comprising:

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said plug shell;

first coupling means adapted to coact with said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated to loosely couple said plug and said receptacle; block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, said plug and receptacle each having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of compressible material; and second coupling means adapted to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said second coupling means being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing'a compression of the blocks of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal, said second coupling means being 5 adapted to advance said plug into said receptacle a relatively short distance for each degree of rotation of said coupling ring, whereby the compression of said block is achieved without requiring the application of substantial torque to said coupling ring.

5. A connector of the type described in claim 4 wherein said second coupling means is a screw thread.

6. A connector of the type described in claim 4 wherein said first coupling means is adapted to advance said plug into said receptacle a relatively large distance for each degree of rotation of said coupling ring.

7. A connector of the type described in claim 6 wherein said first coupling means includes a bayonet pin on said receptacle and a cam track formed in said plug, said cam track being adapted to coact with said pin, when said coupling ring is rotated, to loosely couple said plug and receptacle.

8. A connector formed of a plug and a receptacle each of which has a shell comprising:

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said plug shell;

first coupling means adapted to coact with said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated to loosely couple said plug and said receptacle; block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, said plug and receptacle each having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of com ressible material; and

second coupling means adapted to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said second coupling means being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the blocks of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal, said first and second coupling being concurrently operable.

9. A connector of the type described in claim 8 wherein said first coupling means includes a bayonet pin on said receptacle shell and a cam track formed in said coupling ring, said cam track being adapted to coact with said pin, when said coupling ring is rotated, to couple said plug and receptacle.

10. A connector of the type described in claim 8 wherein said second coupling means includes a screw thread connecting said coupling ring to said plug shell.

11. A thread-assisted bayonet connector formed of a plug having a shell and a receptacle having a shell comprising:

a coupling ring on said plug mounted for rotation relative to said plug shell;

a pin on said receptacle;

a cam track formed in said plug and responsive to the initial rotation of said coupling ring to coact with said pin when said ring is rotated, to loosely couple said plug and receptacle;

a block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, each of said blocks having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of a compressiblematerial; and

a screw thread on said plug responsive to continued rotation of said coupling ring to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said screw thread being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the block of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal.

12. A thread-assisted bayonet connector formed of a plug having a shell and a receptacle having a shell comprising:

a coupling ring on said plug mounted for rotation relative to said plug shell;

a pin on said receptacle;

a cam track formed in said plug and adapted to coact with said pin when said ring is rotated, to loosely couple said plug and receptacle;

a block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, each of said blocks having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of a compressible material; and

means for inhibiting the action of said screw thread until the loose coupling by said pin and cam has been completed.

13. A connector of the type described in claim 12 wherein said cam track is formed in a bayonet sleeve which surrounds said plug shell; and

wherein said means for inhibiting the action of said screw thread includes a coupling sleeve which is normally positioned to couple said bayonet sleeve to said coupling ring so that these elements rotate together, said coupling sleeve being adapted to disengage said coupling ring and said bayonet sleeve when said loose coupling of said plug and receptacle resulting from the coaction of said pin and said cam track has been completed.

14. A connector of the type described in claim 12 wherein the coupling effected by said pin and cam and the coupling effected by said screw thread are effected concurrently.

15. A connector of the type described in claim 14 wherein said cam track is formed in said coupling ring and wherein said screw thread is between said coupling ring and said plug shell.

16. A connector plug which is adapted to be coupled to a mating receptacle comprising:

a plug shell;

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said shell;

a cam track formed in said plug and adapted to coact with said receptacle, when said coupling ring is rotated, to loosely couple said plug and receptacle;

a screw thread adapted to move said plug shell toward said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated, and means for inhibiting the action of said screw thread until the loose coupling effected by the coaction with said cam track has been completed.

17. A connector plug of the type described in claim 16 wherein said cam track is formed in a bayonet sleeve which surrounds said plug shell; and

wherein said means for inhibiting the action of said screw thread includes a coupling sleeve which is normally positioned to couple said bayonet sleeve to said coupling ring so that these elements rotate together, said coupling sleeve being adapted to disengage said coupling ring and said bayonet sleeve when said loose coupling of said plug and receptacle resulting from the coaction of said receptacle and said cam track has been completed.

18. A connector plug of the type described in claim l6 wherein said cam track is formed in said coupling ring and wherein said power thread is formed between said coupling ring and said plug shell.

19. A connector formed of a plug and a receptacle each of which has a shell comprising:

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said plug shell;

first coupling means adapted to coact with said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated to loosely couple said plug and said receptacle;

a block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, said plug and receptacle each having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of compressible material;

second coupling means adapted to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said second coupling means being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the blocks of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal, said second coupling means being operative when said coupling ring is rotated past the point where said loose coupling has been effected; and means for inhibiting the operation of said second coupling means until the loose coupling by said first coupling means has been completed.

20. A connector formed of a plug and a receptacle each of which has a shell comprising:

a coupling ring mounted to rotate relative to said plug shell;

first coupling means adapted to coact with said receptacle when said coupling ring is rotated to loosely couple said plug and said receptacle;

a block of contact-supporting insulating material rigidly supported in each of said shells, said plug and receptacle each having a forward face, said forward faces being positioned parallel to each other when said plug and receptacle are loosely coupled, at least one of said blocks being of compressible material; and

second coupling means adapted to complete the coupling of said plug and receptacle, said second coupling means being effective to force said forward faces against each other under pressure, causing a compression of the blocks of compressible material to form a rigid, substantially airtight interfacial seal, said first coupling means being adapted to advance said plug into said receptacle a relatively large distance for each degree of rotation of said coupling ring, said second coupling means being adapted to advance said plug into said receptacle a relatively short distance for each degree of rotation of said coupling ring, said second coupling means being operative only when said coupling ring is rotated past the point where loose coupling has been effected.

UNITED F Patent No.

Inventor) Hebert F. Dorm-#31 -TEGS PATENT GFFICE (1F CHRRTI'MITION fia 'zi'tembel Dated It is certified that err -a. rppnars in the above-identified pat-arm and that said Letters Patent n? Signed and line 63, i1.

. iwreny corrected as shown below:

line 12, aft-5:1 "thread" "70-1 72" shnuld this 17th day Of June 1.975.

C. MARSHALL DANN Commissianer of Patents and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2092135 *Jun 8, 1936Sep 7, 1937Parker Arthur LPipe coupling
US2497987 *Sep 10, 1948Feb 21, 1950Goode Joseph HAdjustable connection for pipes
US2690345 *Aug 30, 1950Sep 28, 1954Anstine Roland WBayonet type connector for tank filling lines
US2700140 *Jun 26, 1953Jan 18, 1955Titeflex IncShielded, multiconductor waterproof connector
US2731610 *Mar 19, 1952Jan 17, 1956Titeflex IncElectrical connectors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3848950 *Sep 7, 1972Nov 19, 1974G & H TechnologyElectrical connector
US4479689 *Sep 30, 1982Oct 30, 1984The Bendix CorporationCoupling nut for an electrical connector
US4545633 *Jul 22, 1983Oct 8, 1985Whittaker CorporationWeatherproof positive lock connector
US4588247 *May 19, 1983May 13, 1986Souriau & C.Electric connectors intended particularly to be used in a liquid medium particularly under pressure
US4746305 *Apr 24, 1987May 24, 1988Taisho Electric Industrial Co. Ltd.High frequency coaxial connector
US5056829 *Apr 28, 1988Oct 15, 1991Prazisions-Werkzeug AgDevice for interchangeable connection
US5248263 *Nov 22, 1991Sep 28, 1993Yazaki CorporationWatertight electric connector
US7931486Jun 26, 2010Apr 26, 2011Williams-Pyro, Inc.Electrical connector for missile launch rail
US8246372May 27, 2010Aug 21, 2012Williams-Pyro, Inc.Electrical connector with anchor mount
US8967570Oct 31, 2011Mar 3, 2015United Technologies CorporationBlind retention mount
US20100087086 *Oct 6, 2008Apr 8, 2010Acterna LlcFemale Quick Connect Clip For Coaxial Cable
US20140293530 *Jun 12, 2014Oct 2, 2014Apple Inc.Aesthetically pleasing universal dock
USRE31462 *May 13, 1981Dec 13, 1983Automation Industries, Inc.Electrical connector
DE2541127A1 *Sep 16, 1975Nov 4, 1976Arx AgBajonettverschluss
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/311, 439/271, 285/361, 285/148.1, 285/354
International ClassificationH01R13/623, H01R13/62
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/623
European ClassificationH01R13/623