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Publication numberUS3605142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1971
Filing dateSep 16, 1969
Priority dateSep 16, 1969
Publication numberUS 3605142 A, US 3605142A, US-A-3605142, US3605142 A, US3605142A
InventorsMaurice Weinhart
Original AssigneeMaurice Weinhart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety bed slat brackets
US 3605142 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 20, 1971 M. WEINHART sum! BED swr BRA'cKETs Filed Sept. 16. 1969 FIG. I

l N VEN '1 0R. MAURICE WENHART ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,605,142 SAFETY BED SLAT BRACKETS Maurice Weinhart, 18620 Ardmore St., Detroit, Mich. 48235 Filed Sept. 16, 1969, Ser. No. 858,407

Int. Cl. A47c 23/06 US. Cl. 5238 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE The invention relates to safety bed slat brackets for engagement upon supporting metal side rails of a bed frame, the brackets having adjustable features permitting engagement upon the vertical legs of side rails having dilferent heights. The brackets are particularly adapted for use with wooden bed slats of conventional current cross-sectional configuration, but may be easily adapted to varying shapes of such bed slats. The brackets are also arranged to provide for positive engagement 'with the wooden bed slats so as to limit and substantially retard lateral movement between the side rails of the bed frame.

Bed furniture, at the present time, is generally made with a headboard, a footboard, and metal side rails secured thereto, forming a bed frame for supporting a box spring and a mattress thereon. The two end board members are secured in spaced relationship by the pair of metal side rails, forming a rectangular frame. The side rails are generally in the form of a metal angle member having an upstanding vertical leg and an inwardly directed horizontal leg, each end of the side rail having attached thereto, in any suitable manner, a fitting adapted to removably engage the end members, i.e. the headboard and the footboard. Alternatively, the bed frame can be made entirely of metal elements comprising an angled header, foot member, and the two side rails above referred to.

A plurality of bed slats, usually three in number but not limited to such number, are normally arranged transversely of the frame by placing them in spaced apart relationship, longitudinally of the bed frame, upon the horizontal inwardly directed legs of the opposed side rails. The box spring is then set thereon, the mattress being positioned upon the box spring. The length of the bed slats is substantially the distance between the upstanding legs of the side rails. Normally they are approximately A" less than this free distance, but they may be slightly shorter so long as they rest substantially upon the horizontal side rail legs. The slats are usually positioned medially and adjacent but spaced slightly from the extremities of the side rails, and generally at distances equal from each other, so that the box spring and mattress Will be adequately supported thereon. Bed slats generally have a tendency, in time, to shift and move into an angular attitude and eventually fall from the bed frame to the floor, causing the box spring and mattress also to drop, with consequent surprise, shock, embarrassment and, in certain instances, injury to the person or persons resting upon the bed.

These wooden bed slats are generally provided to furniture stores by specialty suppliers, as a separate item from the bed furniture itself, in extra full lengths which the furniture store is then obliged to cut to suitable length for use with each bed frame when the bed set is sold. Because each bed manufacturer positions the side rail fitting slots in the headboard and footboard at slight variations from each other for each size of bed, the side rails will be spaced apart at varying distances for the same size bed and thus no uniform length of bed slat can be provided ahead of time. Such dimension varies 3,605,142 Patented Sept. 20, 1-971 according to the design and plan of the bed manufacturer, who makes his own determination of such spacing, which may vary from bed to bed from as little as to as much as 1" or more.

Inasmuch as such variation is present in the width of the bed frame, bed slats pre-cut to an arbitrary standard length for a twin size, three-quarter size, full or queen size bed will of course vary in their support for the box spring and mattress. If the slats are pre-cut too short, they will rest only upon a small portion of each horizontal leg of the opposed side rail. Unless the bed slats are cut to size quite precisely, they generally have relatively loose fit on the side rails, and any material movement of the bed in time will cause these slats to slip from the rail or rails and drop to the floor. This is particularly the case when beds are moved about in order that they may be made up.

Another problem is the tendency of side rails to belly or bulge outwardly in their mid-sections after a period of time under the loads imposed thereon. If the slats are of relatively shorter length than the distance between the upstanding legs of the opposed side rails, any appreciable increase in such distance will generally cause at least the middle slat to drop and fall to the floor. The invention disclosed herein prevents such bulging out of the side rails by providing positive engagement between the brackets of this invention with the wooden slats, so that engagement of the brackets upon the side rails will maintain the distance therebetween under the loads imposed thereon.

It is an object of the invention to provide safety bed slat brackets having adjustable hook means for firmly securing the bed slat to the side rails whatever may be the distance provided therebetween. Another object is to provide such hook means in an adjustable form so that the brackets can be secured to vertical upstanding side rail legs of different heights. Another object is to provide adjustable brackets having means for positively engaging the wooden bed slats adjacent their ends so as to limit or prevent the side rails from bending or bulging substan tially outwardly under the loads imposed thereon. A further object of the invention is to provide such bed slat brackets made of metal or plastic or other suitable materials, and of relatively low cost.

Various further and more specific objects, features and advantages of the invention will appear from the description given below, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, illustrating by way of example preferred forms of the invention. Reference is here made to the drawing annexed hereto and forming an integral part of this specification, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view having a headboard, footboard and side rails secured together as a bed frame, supporting a box spring and mattress on bed slats attached to the side rails by safety bed slat brackets embodying the invention described and claimed herein.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a safety bed slat bracket embodying one form of the inventive concept, wherein the bracket is attached to the vertical leg of a bed side rail of relatively low height.

FIG. 3 is a view substantially the same as that of FIG. 2 but illustrating a side rail having a higher vertical leg with the adjustable feature of the bracket being extended to accommodate such increased height.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to that illustrated in FIG. 2, illustrating a safety bed slat bracket having a second form embodying the inventive concept.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to that illustrated in FIG. 3, illustrating the bed slat bracket of FIG. 4 arranged in vertically extended engagement upon a side rail having a higher vertical leg than that illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view taken from below illustrating a feature of the brackets comprising a prong and piercing point engaged in a wooden bed slat.

FIG. 7 is a view similar to that illustrated in FIG. 6, but showing the prong or piercing element retracted below the plane of the bracket cradle so that the bed slat may be and is inserted therein without obstruction by the piercing element before it is driven home into the bed slat.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a modification of the adjustable bed slat bracket.

As illustrated in FIG. 1 of the drawing, a bed 10 comprises a headboard 12, a footboard 14, side rails 16 having fittings 18 secured thereto at each end for engagement with the headboard and footboard, a box spring 20 and a mattress 22 supported upon bed slats 24 having brackets 26, or alternatively 28, secured at each end thereof.

The metal side rails 16, in the form of an angle, each comprises a vertically upstanding leg (FIGS. 2 and 4) or the leg 32 of somewhat greater height (FIGS. 3 and 5), and an integrally formed laterally inwardly directed horizontal leg 34, generally of uniform width. The metal end fittings 18 are of currently conventional form and construction, adapted to be removably secured to the headboard and footboard 12 and 14 respectively, in currently conventional manner.

The wooden bed slat 24 of currently conventional configuration has a pair of parallel flat sides 23, 23 terminating at rounded edges 25, 25, generally as illustrated in FIGS. 2-7 of the drawing. The bed slat 24 is of a length substantially equal to the free distance between the upstanding vertical legs of the opposed side rails 16.

The safety bed slat bracket 26 comprises an integrally formed cradle member 36 and a vertically adjustable sliding hook member 38. The cradle member 36 comprises a pair of lateral wings 40, 40 having a configuration adapted to closely engage the opposed side edges 25, 25 of the slat, and having the same general surface contour. The height of the cradle side wings 40, 40 is preferably less than the thickness of the slat member when fully positioned in the cradle member 36, so that the box spring, when imposed upon the bed slats, will not engage the upper edges of the cradle wings. These wings 40, 40 are integrally connected by a web 42 extending longitudinally beyond the inner edges of the wings to an upstanding leg 44 having a height slightly less than the height of the side rail vertical leg 30 when the bracket 26 is at rest upon the side rail leg 34. The vertical leg 44 is integrally connected by the bent web portion 45 to the adjacent parallel leg 46 facing the end of the bed slat 24 and extending downwardly to a line closely adjacent the plane of the cradle Web 42.

The adjustable sliding hook member 38 comprises a first vertical leg 48 adapted to be positioned on the outside of the side rail vertical leg 30, a parallel leg 50 connected to the leg 48 and spaced therefrom by a bent web portion 52, the height of the two legs 48 and 50 being generally the same. The leg 50 is provided adjacent its lower end with laterally inturned lugs or cars 54 at each side thereof, the lugs overlying a portion of the upstanding cradle leg 44 so that the adjustable hook member 38 is slidable thereon between the web 42 and the upper bent web portion 45 connecting the two parallel legs 44 and 46.

The length of the cradle web 42 and side wings 40, 40 is preferably greater than the width of the horizontal side rail leg 34 so that a portion of the web 42 extends beyond the inner edge of the leg (FIGS. 6 and 7). In this portion of the web 42, a slat engaging prong with a piercing point 62 is lanced from the web so that the piercing point lies below the plane of the web, allowing the end of the bed slat 24 to be placed into the cradle 36 between the side wings 40, 40 without obstruction by the piercing point. This arrangement is clearly shown in the perspective view of FIG. 7. After the bed slat end has been posi- 4 tioned within the cradle 36, the piercing point 62 and prong 60 are driven into the wooden bed slat surface and body with a hammer or other suitable tool or instrument, to positively engage the bed slat 24 with the bracket 26 or 28, as the case may be.

A second embodiment of the inventive concept is present in the safety bed slat bracket 28 (FIGS. 4 and 5), which comprises the integrally formed cradle member and the vertically adjustable sliding hook member 72. The cradle member 70 is integrally formed and comprises a pair of lateral wing members 74, 74 having a cross-sectional configuration adapted to closely engage the opposed side edges 25, 25 of the slat 24, the lateral Wings being connected by a web portion 76. The upper edges of the cradle side wings 74, 74 are preferably below the plane of the upper side 23 of the slat member when the slat is fully positioned in the cradle member 70. The connecting web 76 extends longitudinally beyond the inner edges of the wings 74, 74 to an upstanding leg 78 having a height no greater than the height of the side rail vertical leg 30 when the bracket 28 is fully engaged upon the side rail. Adjacent the upper edge 80 of the upstanding leg 78 are a pair of lateral infolded lugs or ears 82, 82 directed toward each other in opposed relationship and spaced slightly from the plane of the leg 78 to allow for vertical sliding movement of the hook member 72.

The adjustable sliding hook member 72 comprises a first vertical leg 84 adapted to slide vertically within the confines of the lugs 82, 82 and closely adjacent the upstanding leg 78 of the cradle member 70, a web connected leg 86 substantially parallel to the leg 84, overlying the lugs 82, 82 and extending upwardly to a line above the upper edge of the leg 84, and a third leg 88 web connected to the leg 86 and directed downwardly, parallel to and spaced from the leg 84 a distance sutficient to allow the side rail leg 30 or 32 to pass between it and the cradle upstanding leg 78. The horizontal length of the web 76 and the side wings 74, 74 is preferably greater than the width of the horizontal side rail leg 34 so that a portion of the web extends beyond the inner edge of the side rail leg to provide in the web 76 for the slat engaging prong 60 with its piercing point 62 as described above.

The bracket modification illustrated in FIG. 8 is that of an integrally-formed bed slat bracket having a cradle member 102 terminating at its sides in a pair of lateral wings 104, 104, and a cradle web portion 106 terminating at one end in the hook member 108 adapted to engage the side rail vertical leg 30 or 32. Hook member 108 comprises a first vertical leg 110 and a second vertical leg 112 connected by a bent web portion 114, the two vertical legs being disposed in parallel alignment and spaced apart sufiiciently to allow the side rail vertical leg to pass closely therebetween. The cradle web portion 106 is also optionally provided with the slat-engaging prong 60 with piercing point 62. The height of the hook member leg 110 is variable, to accommodate different heights of side rail vertical legs.

In operation, the safety bed slat brackets 26 and 28 operate as follows. The end of the wooden bed slat 24 is inserted into the cradle member 36 of bracket 26 so that the side wings 40, 40 engage the lateral edges 25, 25 of the slat, the end of the slat member being moved therebetween to a position closely adjacent the vertical leg 46 of the cradle member. An identical bracket 26 is similarly positioned upon the opposite end of the slat member 24. The slat, with brackets affixed, is then disposed between the parallel side rails so that the adjustable sliding hook members 38 are directly above the side rail vertical legs 30, or 32, as the case may be, with each hook leg 48 positioned outwardly of the side rail leg. In order to obtain such position, it may be necessary to adjust the longitudinal relationship of the brackets 26, 26 at each end of the wooden slat 24, but this can be done easily by merely sliding the slat or bracket relative to each other. The slat and brackets are then lowered upon the side rail vertical legs 30 so that the hook legs 48 are disposed on the outside of the leg 30 and the legs 50 are disposed closely adjacent the inner surface of the legs 30. The brackets, with the slat member attached, are then lowered to a rest position with the cradle web 42 resting directly upon the side rail horizontal leg 34, and with the adjustable sliding hook members 38 fully engaged upon the side rail vertical legs 30. Once this position has been established, the wooden slat member 42, being longitudinally adjusted in the brackets 26, 26, whether adjacent the ends of the side rails or medially thereof, the slat member and brackets are then removed from the side rails and the piercing points 62 and prongs 60 driven into the undersurface 23 and body of the wooden slat member to fix the brackets 26, 26 thereon. The slat with brackets 26, 26 secured thereto is then reimposed upon the opposed parallel side rails 16, 16 of the bed frame at positions adjacent the ends of the side rails and medially thereof, as shown substantially in FIG. 1.

Should the side rails 16 have the higher vertical leg 32 (FIG. 3), the adjustable vertically sliding hook member 38 will be elevated from the cradle member 36 and caused to slide along the vertical leg 44 as the cradle member is lowered to the side rail horizontal leg 34, as shown in FIG. 3.

The bracket 28 with the slat member 24 attached and secured thereto in the manner described above for the bracket 26 is similarly imposed upon the side rails 16. The outer vertical hook leg 88 of the adjustable sliding hook member 72 is disposed outwardly of the side rail vertical leg 30 or 32, the cradle vertical leg 78 being disposed closely adjacent the inner surface of the side rail leg. The adjustable vertically slidable hook member 72 engages the upper edge of the side rail leg 30 or 32 to retain the slat member 24 upon the horizontal legs 34, 34 of the side rails, in the manner described above for the brackets 26.

Although the slat-engaging prong 60 and piercing point 62 are described and illustrated to be in the cradle web portion extruding beyond the inner edge of the side rail leg 34, they may alternatively be located within the area of the leg 34 since they will be driven into the bed slat 24 before the slat is disposed at rest upon the leg 34 in box spring supporting attitude.

Although in each form of the invention described above the bracket-attached bed slat is arranged to be adjustable in length, when so adjusted a finite length is established, and it is then ready for attachment in position upon and to the bed side rails. When so engaged, the bed slats not only secure themselves to the side rails but also tend to prevent the latter from any substantial lateral outward bulging or bending, and to maintain the bed frame and bed in better condition and service for a longer period of time.

The bed slat bracket 100 operates in substantially the same manner as described above, except that the hook member 108, of variable height, is brought down upon the bed side rail vertical leg 30 or 32 to engage the same, the cradle web portion 106 coming to rest upon the side rail horizontal leg 34.

In the preferred forms of the invention described herein, the bed slat 24 is preferably formed of wood, or it could be made of an extruded plastic material of solid or tubular cross-section. The component elements of the safety bed slat brackets 26 and 28 are preferably formed of metal or plastic materials, having such physical properties, including high tensile and substantially good compressive strength, as may be required to carry the static and dynamic loads involved and for the purposes described.

Although certain particular embodiments of the invention are herein described for purposes of explanation, further modifications therein, after study of this specification, will become apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains. Reference should be had to the appended claims in determining the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A safety bed slat bracket for removable attachment to metal bed frame angle-type side rails having an exterior vertical upstanding leg and an inwardly directed horizontal leg comprising a cradle member adapted to receive the end of and be secured to a bed slat,

said cradle member having a web portion adapted to rest upon the hori- Zontal leg of said side rail and lateral wings integrally formed with said Web portion and adapted to closely engage the lateral edges of said bed slat end, and a vertically disposed hook member afiixed to said cradle member at the distal end thereof,

said hook member being vertically slidable upon and adapted to engage said side rail vertical leg when said cradle member rests upon said side rail horizontal leg.

2. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said cradle member comprises a web portion terminating at its sides in upstanding wings adapted to receive said slat end therebetween,

said web portion having a first vertical leg extending upwardly in a direction substantially normal to the plane of said web portion at one end thereof, said hook member being slidable upon said web portion first vertical leg.

3. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said cradle member comprises said web portion terminating at its sides in said upstanding wings adapted to slidably receive said bed slat end therebetween and having a configuration closely conforming to the surface configuration of said bed slat portions next thereto adjacent.

4. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said cradle member comprises a web portion terminating at its sides in upstanding wings adapted to receive said slat end therebetween, said web portion having a vertical leg extending upwardly in a direction substantially normal to the plane of said web portion at one end thereof, said web portion vertical leg having an integrally formed pair of inturned lugs at the upper end of said leg, on either side thereof, and folded over into a plane closely adjacent but spaced from the plane of said leg, said hook member being slidable upon said web portion vertical leg and said inturned lugs.

5. "The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said cradle member web portion is provided with a lanced prong and piercing point disposed below the plane of said web portion and adapted to be driven into said bed slat end when the latter is received and located in said cradle member.

'6. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said cradle member is adapted to slidingly receive said bed slat end therein for longitudinal adjustable attachment of said bracket thereto.

7. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said hook member is adjustable vertically and is slidably engaged with said cradle member.

8. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said hook member is integrally formed with and fixedly appended to said cradle member.

9. The structure defined in claim 2, wherein said web portion further comprises a second vertical leg web-connected to and in parallel alignment with said first vertical leg and spaced therefrom, said second vertical leg extending downwardly toward and terminating below the plane including the upper edges of said wings.

10. The structure defined in claim 2, wherein said hook member comprises a pair of parallel aligned vertical legs web-connected at their upper ends and spaced apart a distance sufficient to allow said bed side rail vertical leg to pass upwardly therebetween,

one of said hoo'k member vertical legs being disposed closely adjacent and on the outside of said side rail vertical leg and the other of said hook member vertical legs being disposed closely adjacent and on the inside of said side rail vertical leg when said hook member is brought to rest upon said latter vertical leg, said hook member inside vertical leg having an integrally formed pair of inturned lugs at the lower end of said leg adapted to slidably embrace said web portion first vertical leg therebetween.

1.1. The structure defined in claim 10, wherein said pair of inturned lugs at the lower end of said hook member inside vertical leg are adapted to limit the upward travel of said vertically adjustable hook member upon engagement with the web connection of said hook member vertical legs. 12. The structure defined in claim 4, wherein said hook member comprises a first vertical leg web-connected at its lower end to a second vertical leg in parallel and alignment with and spaced slightly from said first vertical leg,

and a third vertical leg web-connected to said second vertical leg at its upper end, in parallel and alignment with and spaced from said first vertical leg on the side opposite that of said second vertical leg a distance sufiicient to allow said bed side rail vertical leg to pass upwardly between said third vertical leg and said cradle member web portion vertical leg.

13. The structure defined in claim 4, wherein said pair of inturned lugs are folded over said web portion vertical leg on the side facing said wings.

14. The structure defined in claim 4, wherein said pair of inturned lugs at the upper end of said web portion vertical leg are adapted to limit the upward travel of said vertically adjustable hook member upon engagement with the web-connection of said first and second hook member vertical legs.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1902 Cooper 5238 12/1903 Webb 5-238 US. Cl. XR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5920930 *Jun 12, 1997Jul 13, 1999Harrow; LawrenceLocking device for a boxspring support rail and method
US6434804 *Dec 11, 1998Aug 20, 2002Batesville Services, Inc.Casket bed
US6877195Feb 7, 2002Apr 12, 2005Hickory Springs Manufacturing CompanyCasket bed frame assembly
US7861339Aug 11, 2008Jan 4, 2011Lawrence HarrowBed base
US7865981Jan 9, 2009Jan 11, 2011Lawrence HarrowBed base assembled without using tools or separate fasteners and method
US8191186 *Apr 27, 2006Jun 5, 2012Tournadre Sa Standard GumDevice for the suspension of slats for a bed
US8402577Jun 2, 2009Mar 26, 2013Lawrence HarrowEasy to assemble bed base, two-component connector and kit
WO1999055202A1Apr 22, 1999Nov 4, 1999Delahousse Et Fils SaDeformable device for maintaining the end of one or several slats on a bed base frame or the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/238, 5/282.1
International ClassificationA47C23/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47C23/067, A47C23/062
European ClassificationA47C23/06C8, A47C23/06C