Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3605370 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1971
Filing dateMar 23, 1970
Priority dateMar 23, 1970
Publication numberUS 3605370 A, US 3605370A, US-A-3605370, US3605370 A, US3605370A
InventorsPrible Glen V
Original AssigneeCombustion Eng
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Preassembled insulating panels for high temperature furnaces
US 3605370 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 20, 1971 v, PRIBLE 3,605,370

PREASSEMBLED INSULATING PANELS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE FURNACES Filed March 23, 1970 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I M F|G-2 /Z a .M/ M W/ -7 14 M 4 4 fig 1 1%,H A i? ALFJF/WC/E/ 1 3.?

Patented Sept. 20, 1971 3,605,370 PREASSEMBLED INSULATING PANELS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE FURNACES Glen V. Prible, Malvern, Pa., assignor to Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, Conn. Filed Mar. 23, 1970, Ser. No. 21,703

Int. Cl. E04b 1/80 U.S. Cl.'52622 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Preassembled insulating panels for high temperature furnaces having a nonexposed anchor for hot side refractory material. At least one layer of refractory block is fixed in rows to a metal backing so as to have transverse spaces between adjacent rows of the block. A high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket is placed over the rows of refractory block and folded into the transverse spaces therebetween. The anchor mechanism for the ceramic blanket is placed in the folded portions of the blanket so as to be protected from direct furnace exposure.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Furnaces, and more particularly high temperature furnaces such as heat treating, annealing or small reheat furnaces, have the walls thereof lined with refractory material for protection from the intense heat and corrosive atmosphere generated within these furnaces. The refractory material must maintain its structural and thermal characteristics at operating temperatures and offer maximum resistance to chemical reactions. It must also radiate heat and act as a barrier to retain products of combustion.

High temperature furnaces of the above type are usually formed by the laying of refractory bricks to build up the interior furnace wall structure or by any other similar on-site construction method. When the refractory is no longer useful in accomplishing its necessary functions, it must be stripped out and replaced with new refractory material. This rebricking procedure involves substantial time and labor as well as being high in cost. One technique used to overcome the economic disadvantages of rebricking is the preassembling of uniform, interconnecta'ble panel units of refractory material which may be arranged to form the furnace interior. These panels are readily interchangeable upon wearing or other damage occurring within the furnace.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An improved preassembled insulating panel is herein provided for use in high temperature furnaces operating in a temperature range up to 2300" F. At least one layer of refractory block is fixed in spaced rows to a metal backing. A high temperature insulation ceramic Wool blanket is placed over the rows of refractory block and folded into the transverse spaces between the rows. An anchor mechanism for the blanket is placed in the folded portions thereof so as to be protected from direct furnace exposure in order to extend the life of the anchor and thus the panel itself.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the improved preassembled insulating panel according to this invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the improved preassembled insulating panel according to this invention.

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the panel taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the panel taken along line 44 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a second embodiment of the preassembled insulating panel according to this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of the improved preassembled insulating panel 10 of this invention. Affixed to a metal backing 12 is an assembly of low temperature refractory blocks 14 (see FIG. 3) made from any suitable refractory material such as a calcium silicate. The blocks 14 are anchored to the metal backing 12 by means of speed clips 16. It is noted that the metal backing 12 is preferably of the expanded metal lath type so as to facilitate connection of the speed clips and other anchoring mechanisms as well as permitting the use of a cement fill for the lath. As shown in FIG. 4, transversely oriented to the blocks 14 are a series of rows of high temperature refractory blocks 18 also preferably made of a calcium silicate. The composition of the high temperature blocks 18 is such that they will withstand temperatures of 1800-2 00O F. The high temperature refractory blocks 18 are secured in the preassembled panel 10 by means of alloy wires 24 which pass through the blocks 18 and 14 and are tied to the metal backing 12.

The rows of high temperature refractory block 18 are separated by transverse spaces 20 and furthermore have end spaces 22 (see FIG. 2). A high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket '26 preferably formed of an alumina-silicate ceramic fiber is laid over the rows of high temperature refractory block 18 and folded into the transverse spaces 20 and 22. In order to anchor the blanket 26 in the preassembled panel 10, alloy rods 28 are placed in the folded blanket portions within the transverse spaces 20 and 22. The rods 28 are then tied to the metal backing 12 by means of alloy wires 30 (within the spaces 20') and 32 (within the spaces 22). In this manner of construction, the rods 28 will be nested in the folds of the blanket 26 so as not to be exposed directly to the high temperature and corrosive atmosphere of the furnace. The rods 28 will therefore be longer lasting and will not require unnecessary replacing of panel segments due to premature rod failure. If it is desired to form insulating panels capable of withstanding up to 2300 F., a layer of ceramic wool (not shown) is inserted between the blocks 18 and the blanket 26.

With the panel 10 so constructed, a series of panels can be assembled to form a furnace interior wall structure. The metal backing 12 may then be fixed by suitable means to any particular support structure. The uniform interchangeable modular form of the panels 10 permits economical removal and reinstallation of similar panels when a particular panel becomes damaged or excessively worn.

FIG. 5 shows a modified form 34 of the improved preassembled panel according to this invention. Panel 34 is comprised of a metal backing 12 upon which high temperature refractory blocks 18' are positioned in transverse, spaced rows. The refractory blocks 18 which are similar to those of FIGS. 1-4 are affixed to the metal backing 12' in a similar manner to that of the above-described panel. A high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket 26' is then placed over the refractory blocks 18' and folded within the spaces 20 therebetween. Then blanket 26' is anchored to the metal backing 12' by means of alloy rods 28' nested within the folds of the blanket 26'. The modified panel 34 contains only one layer of refractory block and therefore has lower temperature capabilities than the panel of FIG. 1. Specifically, this panel is designed for temperature use up to 1600" F.

From the foregoing it is apparent that there is herein provided a high temperature insulating panel of the preassembled type which may be readily used to form furnaces operating in a temperature range up to 2300 F. The panels are readily interchangeable so that upon the failure of materials due to the furnace action, the panels can be readily and economically interchanged. Due to the unique construction of spaced rows of refractory block and overlying high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket folded within the transverse spaces, it is possible to supply anchor mechanisms for the wool blanket which are not directly exposed to the high temperature and corrosive conditions of the furnace atmosphere and thus are not subject to premature failure.

While these preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be understood that they are merely illustrative and that changes may be made without departing from the source of the invention as claimed.

I claim:

1. Preassembled interconnecta'ble insulating panels for high temperature furnaces, said panels comprising a metal backing, at least one layer of refractory block fixed in rows to said metal backing so as to have transverse spaces between adjacent rows, a high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket covering said at least one layer of refractory block and folded into the transverse spaces between said adjacent rows, and anchor means for securing said high temperature insulating blanket to said metal backing, said anchor means positioned within said folds of said insulating blanket so as to be protected from direct furnace exposure.

2. The assembly of claim 1 wherein there is a first layer and a second layer of refractory block fixed to said metal backing, said first layer located between said backing and said second layer and oriented transversely to said second layer, said second layer lying in transversely spaced rows across said first layer.

3. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said at least one layer of refractory blocks are formed from calcium silicate.

4. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said high temperature insulating ceramic wool blanket is formed of an alumina-silicate ceramic fiber.

5. The assembly of claim 1 wherein said anchor means comprises elongated alloy rods positioned within said folds of said insulating blanket, said alloy rods being secured to said metal backing by means of alloy wire.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 313,971 3/1885 White 52-622 1,487,578 3/ 1924 Kirkpatrick 52-513 3,176,433 4/1965 Davies et al. 52-622 3,209,503 10/ 1965 Mostoller 5 2-5 12 3,378,975 4/1968 Hill 52-404 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner L. A. BRAUN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52-222, 512, 513

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3952470 *Jun 3, 1974Apr 27, 1976J T Thorpe CompanyFurnace lining apparatus
US4001996 *Aug 11, 1975Jan 11, 1977J. T. Thorpe CompanyPrefabricated insulating blocks for furnace lining
US4012877 *Apr 2, 1976Mar 22, 1977J. T. Thorpe CompanyPrefabricated insulating structure for insulating a corner in a furnace
US4086737 *Jan 7, 1977May 2, 1978Johns-Manville CorporationRefractory fiber blanket module with heat shrinkage compensation
US4123886 *Jan 7, 1977Nov 7, 1978Johns-Manville CorporationRefractory fiber blanket module with increased insulation
US4779390 *Mar 7, 1986Oct 25, 1988Audi AgLining for the interior of an automotive vehicle
US5218615 *Aug 29, 1991Jun 8, 1993Didier-Werke AgFurnace lining and lining brick therefor with improved heat absorbing characteristics
US5759663 *Oct 31, 1996Jun 2, 1998Thorpe Products CompanyHard-faced insulating refractory fiber linings
US6143107 *Jan 2, 1998Nov 7, 2000Hounsel; Mack A.Hard-faced insulating refractory fiber linings
US8615969 *Mar 16, 2011Dec 31, 2013Suzuki Laboratory of Material and Structure Co. Ltd.Reinforcement structure of rectangular flat metal plate
US20130014457 *Mar 16, 2011Jan 17, 2013Toshiro SuzukiReinforcement structure of rectangular flat metal plate
DE2635623A1 *Aug 7, 1976Feb 24, 1977Thorpe Co J TIsolierblock
EP0426891A1 *Nov 7, 1989May 15, 1991Rolf Kuhn GmbhFireproof plate on the basis of sodium silicate
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/783.14, 52/222, 52/512, 373/137, 52/513
International ClassificationE04B1/94, F27D1/06, F27D1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF27D1/06, E04B1/942
European ClassificationE04B1/94B1, F27D1/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 14, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: COMBUSTION ENGINEERING, INC.
Effective date: 19880927
Owner name: VFR, INC., 901 EAST 8TH AVENUE, KING OF PRUSSIA, P
Oct 14, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: VFR, INC., 901 EAST 8TH AVENUE, KING OF PRUSSIA, P
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:COMBUSTION ENGINEERING, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004993/0109
Effective date: 19880927