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Publication numberUS3607670 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1971
Filing dateFeb 26, 1968
Priority dateFeb 26, 1968
Publication numberUS 3607670 A, US 3607670A, US-A-3607670, US3607670 A, US3607670A
InventorsRobert R King
Original AssigneeFrench Oil Mill Machinery
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for deodorizing glyceride oils within a single vessel using counter current indirect heat exchange and direct superheated steam injection
US 3607670 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States atent 3,607,670

[72] Inventor Robert R. King 2,759,883 8/1956 Thurman 202/233 Sherman, Tex. 3,061,622 10/1962 Fiala 260/428 [21] Appl. No. 714,156 3,096,255 7/1963 Redenbaugh 203/92 [22] Filed Feb. 26,1968 3,172,922 3/1965 Kehse 260/428 [45] Patented Sept. 21,1971 3,197,386 7/1965 Lau 203/92 [73] Assignee Elie F 31:11 Oil Mill Machinery Company Primary Examiner wilbur L Bascomb, In

Attorneys-Kenneth R. Sommer, Robert C. Weber and Joseph P. Gastel [54] METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DEODORIZING GLYCERIDE OILS WITHIN A SINGLE VESSEL USING COUNTER CURRENT INDIRECT HEAT C E AND DRECT SUPERHEATED STEAM ABSTRACT: A process and apparatus for continuously 1N JECTION deodorizmg glyceride oil in a single vessel of rectangular or Claims 10 Drawing Figs annular cross section arranged in and open at its upper end to discharge oil vapors into a vacuum chamber and including an [52] US. Cl 203/23, outer low heat exchange Section and an inner high heat 203/ 203/92 203/100 202/197* 202/205, exchange section, wherein the incoming oil is passed inwardly 202/233' 202,234 260/428 5554 55/l98' through the low heat exchange section in a circuitous path to 99/1 18 the inner end of the high heat exchange section bypassing the [51] Int. Cl B0ld 3/10, outer end h f h outgoing il i ed outwardly succes- Cogf 5/10 sively through the high and low heat exchange sections in a Field of Search 203/92, 96, circuitous Path, the incoming oil is heated and the outgoing 3 100; 202/197, 233, 234, 205; 260/428, 55, 54, is cooled by counter flow heat exchange relation 198; 99/1 165 therebetween in the low heat exchange section, the outgoing oil is heated to deodorizing temperature by passing a high tem- [56] References Clted perature medium through the high heat exchange section in UNITED STATES PATENTS heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, steam is 2,224,925 12/1940 Potts et a1. 203/100 superheated by passing steam through the high heat exchange 2,489,509 11/1949 Straight..." 203/92 section in heat exchange relation to the heated outgoing oil 2,559,129 7/1951 Miller /54 therein, and both the incoming and outgoing oil are per- 2,621,196 12/1952 Thurman... 260/428 meated with superheated steam bubbles by passing the super- 2,621,197 12/1952 Thurman... 260/428 heated steam through the oil in the low and high heat 2,691,665 10/1954 Bailey 203/92 exchange sections.

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METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DEODORIZING GLYCERIDE OILS WITHIN A SINGLE VESSEL USING COUNTER CURRENT INDIRECT HEAT EXCHANGE AND DIRECT SUPERIIEATED STEAM INJECTION This disclosure relates to process and apparatus for the purification of oil, more particularly for deodorizing and removal of objectionable tastes from edible glyceride oils, and to do so in a single, continuous operation.

The deodoration of oils has in the past been generally carried on by batch methods by heating the oil gradually up to a temperature from 400 to 500 F., and holding it at the higher temperature for from 1 to 10 hours and then gradually cooling the oil below 200 F., the cycle being carried out under continuous treatment with stripping steam and under a reduced absolute pressure. Somewhat more recently continuous or semicontinuous deodorizers have been employed.

Many of the types of continuous deodorizers have proved in practice to have certain faults and shortcomings not originally foreseen because of the complexity of their design. These systems have a great multiplicity of internal vessels and piping with considerable instrumentation required to make them operational, resulting in an abnormal amount of maintenance of considerable difficulty because of the inaccessibility of the many parts and elements.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a process and apparatus in which the entire treatment takes place in a single vessel, arranged within an outer vessel, and in which very little internal piping and control instrumentation is required; and where all internal parts and elements are easily accessible for maintenance and inspection without removal from their operational position.

Another object is to provide a process and apparatus of this type in which heat exchange between the incoming cold oil and the outgoing hot oil takes place within an enclosed vessel.

It is also an object of this invention to provide process and apparatus in which the entire treatment of the oil takes place in an open vessel arranged in a vacuum chamber or vessel.

Another object is to provide apparatus of this kind in which the flow of oil during treatment takes place by gravity.

Another object is to provide means for the superheating of stripping steam by the hot oil under treatment.

A further object is to provide for the continuous treatment of the oil with superheated steam throughout the complete heating, holding and cooling cycles of the oil.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG.. I is a diagrammatic illustration of a deodorizer embodying this invention in a vacuum chamber with the necessary inlet and discharge piping.

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic plan view thereof on line 22, FIG. 1, showing the oil flow.

FIG. 3 is a similar diagrammatic sectional plan view thereof on line 33, FIG. 1, showing the piping for the heating mediums.

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic vertical sectional elevation thereof on line 4-4, FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional elevation thereof taken on line 5-5, FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a sectional plan view thereofon line 6-6, FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a sectional elevational thereof on line 7-7 FIG. 1, and including an outer shell or casing of the apparatus.

FIG. 8 is a transverse sectional elevation of a modified construction.

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic transverse plan view thereof on line 9-9, FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic section thereof on an enlarged scale on line I0l0, FIG. 8.

In accordance with this invention the oil to be deodorized enters the apparatus and flows in heat conducting relation to the treated oil before it is discharged from the apparatus to effect a preliminary heating of the incoming oil. The oil to be treated then passes to a part of the apparatus in which the temperature is raised by means of a high-temperature fluid, after which the oil remains at this high temperature so that it is thoroughly deodorized whereupon it flows toward the exit of the apparatus into heat exchange relation with the incoming oil to be treated. All of the treatment of the oil is carried on in a vacuum and steam is admitted to the oil in all stages of the treatment to assist in removing unpleasant odors or tastes from the oil.

Referring in the first place to FIGS. 1-7, the apparatus includes an outer vessel or container 20, FIG. 7, within which a vacuum is maintained and in which the inner vessel or container 21 as shown in FIGS. 1-7 is located. The inner vessel or container 21 is preferably arranged in the outer vessel 20 so as to be readily removable therefrom for cleaning, repairs or the like, and for this purpose the outer vessel 20 may be provided at one end with an opening with a removable closure (not shown). To facilitate removal of the inner vessel, this vessel is supported on suitable structural members, such as a channelshaped member 22 welded or otherwise secured thereto and on which wheels 23 may be mounted to roll on tracks 24 mounted in the outer vessel 20. Consequently when the end wall of the outer vessel 20 is opened and certain pipe connections are disconnected, the inner vessel may be moved lengthwise out through the open end of the outer vessel.

The inner vessel 21 is of generally rectangular cross section, open at its upper end and provided with a series of partitions or plates spaced to form passages or channels in which the oil to be treated is passed at one face of such plates or partitions and the treated and deodorized oil flows on the other side thereof, thus providing an exchange of heat from the treated oil to the incoming untreated oil through the partitions or plates. In FIG. 1 a plurality of partitions 27 and 28 are arranged substantially parallel to an end wall 26 of the inner vessel. Oil to be treated passes through an inlet pipe 32 into the space between a pair of partition plates 27 and 28 and oil which has been subjected to various deodorizing treatments passes through a pipe 33 from the space between the end wall 26 and the partition 27. The cool incoming oil is consequently arranged in heat exchange relation to the hot deodorized oil to effect a cooling of the deodorized oil and a heating of the relatively cool incoming oil.

The plates described provide passages or channels 36 and the flow of incoming oil from one of these passages to the next adjacent passage may be effected in any suitable manner, for example, by means of U-shaped connectors 38 which are arranged alternately at opposite sides of the vessel 21 and thus transmit the incoming oil longitudinally inwardly in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path from one of the passages 36 to the next one. Similarly the treated oil passes longitudinally outwardly to the left in FIG. I from one of the spaces 36 to another in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path and this connection may be effected in any suitable manner, for example, by means of a series of tubular or horizontal passages 39 extending from one of the spaces 36 to an adjacent one.

It is desirable of course to remove vapors from the incoming oil in the outer low heat exchange part or section of the vessel 21 as well as from the treated or outgoing oil which is in heat exchange relation to the incoming oil. It is also necessary to divide these vapors in their discharge from the inner vessel 21 so that the vapors or condensate from the incoming oil will not mix with and deteriorate the oil which has been treated. For this reason the upper open end of the inner vessel, as clearly shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, is divided lengthwise of the apparatus into two parts by means of an upright partition 25, and the passages containing the incoming oil are covered by means of rooflike devices 34 which extend throughout approximately one-half of the lengths of these passages 36, the other half of these passages being open for the discharge of vapors therefrom. Similar rooflike closures 35 are provided over the passages or channels 42 for the treated oil and, consequently, as will be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, vapors from the untreated oil may pass to the open half of the top of the container 21 and on through mist-eliminating members 43 feet which form a roof on horizontal partition in the upper end of the inner vessel 21.

In the other part of the upper end of the vessel 21 at the other side of the partition 25, the roof 35 over the passages for the treated oil will be at the left of the partition 25 in FIG. 5, so that approximately one-half of the treated oil is first closed while the vapors from the treated oil pass upwardly to the right of the partition 25.

The roofs on the deodorized oil passages or channels are over only that portion of the passage under the incoming oil mist eliminator. Deodorizing oil mist under the roof is shielded I from rising into the incoming oil mist area. It must travel transverse under the shielded" passage to the opposite side of the vessel past the vertical center baffle 25 where the passage is open to the deodorized mist eliminator.

The arrangement of rooflike structures on the incoming oil is reverse from the deodorized oil and prevents incoming oil mist from entering the deodorized oil mist area.

With this arrangement the droplets ofi the incoming oil mist eliminators cannot contaminate the deodorized oil leaving the vessel. There is no problem with contamination from the deodorized oil droplets.

I have also provided baffles within the passages or channels from both the incoming and the treated oil to force the oil in these passages to take the desired circuitous route. These internal baffles 29 extend crosswise of the passages or channels for the oil and are provided with limited openings 31 through which the oil may pass. For example, in FIG. 3 it will be noted that these bafiles are formed so as to provide for restricted flow of oil in the passages or channels, and this may be accomplished by providing notches in these baffles through which the oil may flow, or by making the baffles slightly smaller than the transverse dimensions of the passages into which they extend so that they materially restrict the flow of oil and prevent some of the oil from flowing more or less directly from the inlet to the outlet and thus avoid the treatment for removing odors or tastes from the oil. These internal baffles also prevents a stratified flow of oil with the flow in the middle of the passages at greater speed than oil in contact with the walls of the passages.

It has been found advantageous to submit the outgoing oil during treatment to steam in the inner high heat exchange section and consequently steam pipes 44 and 45, FIGS. 1 and 3, are provided at opposite sides of the inner vessel which are connected to branch pipes 46 and 47 which extend into the opposite sides of the vessel 21. The branch pipes 46 in the construction illustrated by way of example enter into the passages 36 and are provided with holes within the passages arranged at intervals to discharge steam in small jets upwardly into the oil. The other branch pipes 47 extend into the spaces 42 and are provided with small apertures to discharge steam into the oil which has been treated and is moving toward the discharge pipe 33.

The incoming oil which has passed into heat exchange relation to the treated oil is discharged from this part of the vessel 21 through a pipe 48 and passes to the opposite or inner end of the high heat section of vessel 21, bypassing the outer end of such high heat section. Thus, it enters into a space between the end wall 49 and a partition 50 which together form a vertical passage or space 51 for the oil. Another space or jacketed partition 52 is formed for passage of a high-temperature liquid, such as a liquid known by the term Dowtherm and which has a very high boiling point, without giving off vapor. Certain mineral oils or other liquids may however be used to provide a high-temperature fluid in the spaces 52 in this part of the vessel 31, this high-temperature liquid being provided through a pipe 54 with branch pipes 55 leading to the spaces 52 through which the outgoing oil which is being treated passes. The Dowtherm" or other high-temperature medium passes transversely through the plate heaters 52 and exits through pipes 56 connected to the manifold 58.

Four of these plate heaters 52 are provided and the oil passing past these into the channels or passages 51. reaches its highest deodorizing temperature. The outgoing oil then passes through channels or passages having three sets of plate heat interchangers 59. These heat interchanger plates are connected to a steam supply through the pipes 60, and 60". As will be seen in FIG. 3, steam from supply pipe 60 passes through its plate heat interchanger 59 and connects to the manifold 61. Steam from supply pipe 60 passes through its plate heater 59 to the manifold 45 and steam from supply pipe 60 passes through its plate heater 59 to the manifold 44. Steam from the supplies 60, 60 and 60" is brought to a superheated condition after passing transversely throughtheir plate heat interchangers by absorbing heat from the oil in the passages 51, and thus the manifolds 44, 45 and 61 are now supplied with superheated steam. Just as the manifolds 44 and 45 have branch pipes 46 and 47 with perforations inside of the vessel 21, the manifold 61 has branch pipes 62.

The heated outgoing oil from the passage 51, after being heated to a high temperature by the high temperature liquid and after having given off some of its excess high temperature in the steam interchangers passes into an intermediate portion or section of the vessel 21 into a series of passages or channels 65 which are open at their upper ends and in which the heated oil remains for a certain length of time in order to dispose of all or most of its gases or vapors which cause an unpleasant odor or taste. These passages 65 are open at their upper ends so that the gases or vapors are free to flow through the upper end of the vessel 21 into the vessel 20. The oil then passes into the low heat exchange parts of the vessel 21 and becomes cooled by the heat exchange action in this vessel so that it can be readily handled when discharged through the outlet pipe 33.

A drain pipe 67 is provided for draining oil from the apparatus when the same is to be cleaned.

It will be obvious that the apparatus described can equally well be incorporated in a circular body or vessel of generally annular cross section and which is open at its upper end and can be incorporated in an outer vessel 76. The outer vessel may be provided with manholes 77 and 78 through which a person can enter the outer vessel for making adjustments or repairs. One or the other of these manholes can be connected to an evacuator. The outer vessel may also have a drain outlet 79 in the bottom thereof. With this construction the various straight parallel plates in FIGS. 1-7 are now arranged in a circular form in the construction shown in FIGS. 8 and 9.

In this construction the incoming oil to be treated enters through a passage 80 leading to an annular space 81 and the oil which has been treated is discharged through the outgoing outlet 83 connected with an annular passage 84 between the outer wall of the vessel and an inner partition 85. Generally, the incoming oil flows in a horizontal circuitous annular path, while the outgoing oil flows radially outwardly in such path.

The annular passages in FIGS. 8 and 9 may be provided where necessary with closures 87 in the form of walls extending between adjacent annular partitions. These transverse walls form the annular spaces into passages or channels similar to those shown in FIGS. 1-7. Where the walls 87 stop further flow of oil in an annular passage, crossover members may be employed for this purpose. As will be seen in FIG. 9 in dotted lines and in full lines in FIG. 8, a crossover 82 connects the outer, annular passage 84 under the annular passage 84 to the next inner, annular passage 84. Like crossovers 82 are provided for annular passages 81, as seen in dotted lines in FIG. 9. As seen in FIG. 8, the bottom of the inner vessel 75 comprises a disk-shaped casting having double walls 88 and 88' providing a space 89. Vertical walls in this space 89 close it off to provide the crossover 82 wherever required. Each crossover 82 may be provided with a drainpipe 82.

Since annular passages 81 and 84 are alternate passages, the incoming oil in each passage, after travelling around the passage in a clockwise direction, is stopped when it reaches a stop wall 87. It then descends into a crossover 82 and then passes up into the next passage 81 proceeding again in a clockwise direction. After passing through three annular passages 81, it passes through a longer crossover 82" into the inner end of the innermost part of the vessel 75, the inner high heat section bypassing the outer end thereof, such section having annular passages 90. Here the oil flows in a counterclockwise direction where stop walls and openings provide crossovers 91. The inner two cylindrical walls 92 are provided with the high heat medium in contact with and flowing annularly through high heat plate interchangers 93 which heat the oil to its high deodorizing temperature. Also the next two walls 92 are provided with plate interchangers 94 to superheat steam passing into and annularly through them. Oil then continues to flow via annular passages 84 in a counterclockwise direction by means of their stop walls 87 and crossovers 82, until it reaches the outlet pipe 83. Vertical baffles 95 are provided in all of the cylindrical passages 81, 84 and 90, as is customary for reasons previously explained.

A cylindrical wall 96 divides the outer low heat interchange or exchange section from the inner high heat exchange section.

Roofs 98 and 99 similar to the roofs 34 are semicircular and have their ends terminate alternately at vertical dividers 100 diametrically opposite each other that divide the area above the roofs in the low heat section between the wall 96 and the outer end wall of the inner vessel 75.

High heat medium enters the plate heaters 93 through an inlet pipe 104 and exits through an outlet 102. Steam enters the plate heaters 94 through an inlet 106 and after being superheated exits through discharge pipes 107 in the bottom wall 88 and into the space 89. Throughout the bottom wall 88 between the annular walls in the annular passages 81, 84 and 90, are steam nozzles 110. These are welded into the walls 88 and 88' and have openings 111 which allow the superheated steam to blow through small holes 112 in the head of the nozzles and upwardly into the oil in the passages. Thus from entrance to exit the oil is permeated with superheated steam bubbles.

It will be understood that various changes in the details, materials and arrangements of parts which have been herein described and illustrated in order to explain the nature of the invention may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A process for continuously deodorizing oil, such as glyceride oil, in a single vessel arranged in and open to discharge vapors from the oil into a vacuum chamber and including an outer low heat exchange section and an inner high heat exchange section, said process comprising passing the incoming oil inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a circuitous path to the inner end of said high heat exchange section, passing the outgoing oil outwardly successively through said high and low heat exchange sections in a circuitous path, heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween in said low heat exchange section, heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high temperature medium through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, superheating steam by passing steam through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and permeating both the incoming oil and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

2. The process of claim 1 including separating the vapors from the incoming oil from the vapors from the outgoing oil in said low heat exchange section.

3. The process of claim 1 including restricting the flow of oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

4. The process of claim 1 wherein said vessel is of generally rectangular cross section, open at its upper end and includes an intermediate section arranged between said low and high heat exchange sections, said process including passing the incoming oil longitudinally inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path to the inner end of said high heat exchange section bypassing the outer end thereof, passing the outgoing oil longitudinally outwardly successively through said high heat exchange section, intermediate section and low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path, heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween in said low heat exchange section, heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high temperature medium transversely through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, superheating steam by passing steam transversely through said high heat exchange secton in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and permeating both the incoming oil and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam upwardly through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections and in said intermediate section.

5. The process of claim 1 wherein said vessel is of generally annular cross section and open at its upper end, said process including passing the incoming oil radially inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous annular path to the inner end of said high heat exchange section bypassing the outer end thereof, passing the outgoing oil radially outwardly successively through said high and low heat exchange sections in a horizontal circuitous annular path, heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween in said low heat exchange section, heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high temperature medium annularly through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, superheating steam by passing steam annularly through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and permeating both the incoming and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam upwardly through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

6. Apparatus for continuously deodorizing oil, such as glyceride oil, and comprising a vacuum chamber; a single vessel arranged in and open to discharge vapors from the oil into said vacuum chamber, said vessel including an outer low heat exchange section and an inner high heat exchange section, said low heat exchange section including means for passing the incoming oil inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a circuitous path to the inner end of said high heat exchange section, said high and low heat exchange sections including means for passing the outgoing oil outwardly successively through said high and low heat exchange sections in a circuitous path, said low heat exchange section including means for heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween in said low heat exchange section; means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high-temperature medium through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for superheating steam by passing steam through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel and said steam superheating means for permeating both the incoming oil and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said vessel includes means for separating the vapors from the incoming oil from the vapors from the outgoing oil in said low heat exchange section.

8. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said vessel includes means for restricting the flow of oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

9. .The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said vessel is of generally rectangular cross section, open at its upper end and includes an intermediate section arranged between said low and high heat exchange sections, said low heat exchange section including means for passing the incoming oil longitudinally inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path to the inner end of said high heat exchange section bypassing the outer end thereof, said high heat exchange section, intermediate section and low heat exchangesection including means for passing the outgoing oil longitudinally outwardly successively through said high heat exchange section, intermediate section and low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous zigzag path, said low heat exchange section including means for heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween inn said low heat exchange section; means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high temperature medium transversely through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for superheating steam by passing steam transversely through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel and said steam superheating means for permeating both the incoming oil and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam upwardly through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections and in said intermediate section.

10. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said vessel is of generally annular cross section and open at its upper end, said low heat section including means for passing the incoming oil radially inwardly through said low heat exchange section in a horizontal circuitous annular path to the inner end of said high heat exchange secton bypassing the outer end thereof, said high and low heat sections including means for passing the outgoing oil radially outwardly successively through said high and low heat exchange sections in a horizontal circuitous annular path, said low heat exchange section including means for heating the incoming oil and cooling the outgoing oil by counter flow heat exchange relation therebetween in said low heat exchange section; means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for heating the outgoing oil to deodorizing temperature by passing a high-temperature medium annularly through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the outgoing oil therein, means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel for superheating steam by passing steam annularly through said high heat exchange section in heat exchange relation with the heated outgoing oil therein, and means in said vacuum chamber and connected to said vessel and said steam superheating means for permeating both the incoming oil and outgoing oil with superheated steam bubbles by passing the superheated steam upwardly through the oil in said low and high heat exchange sections.

Po-mso Patent No.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Dated September 21, 1971 I gg; Robert R. King It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column Column Column Column Column Column line line

line

line

line

line

insert "outgoing" after "the".

"84" (second occurrence) should read 8l-.

Signed and sealed this 25th day of April 1972.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD MJL 1 JR Aztesting Officer RCBERT GOTTSCHALK Commissioner of Patents

Referenced by
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US4211610 *Sep 26, 1973Jul 8, 1980The Cambrian Engineering Group LimitedApparatus for heat and mass transfer
US4613410 *Oct 7, 1983Sep 23, 1986Rivers Jr Jacob BMethods for dynamically refining and deodorizing fats and oils
US4680092 *Oct 5, 1983Jul 14, 1987Hermann StageProcess for degassing, dehydrating and precut separation in straight-run distillation of crude fatty acids
US4838997 *Nov 13, 1987Jun 13, 1989Atlas-Danmark A/SDeodorization process for triglyceride oil
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US5401866 *Jan 7, 1994Mar 28, 1995Praxair Technology, Inc.Method of recovering waste heat from edible oil deodorizer and improving product stability
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US8088257 *Oct 20, 2008Jan 3, 2012Kii, Inc.Solar distillation system
US8580085Oct 14, 2010Nov 12, 2013Kll, Inc.Systems and methods for water distillation
US8952187Jul 18, 2012Feb 10, 2015Cargill, IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for processing vegetable oils
EP0032434A2 *Jan 9, 1981Jul 22, 1981THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYProcess for deodorizing edible oil
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Classifications
U.S. Classification203/23, 96/199, 202/234, 554/205, 202/233, 96/203, 95/264, 203/25, 202/205, 159/28.6, 203/92, 202/197, 203/100, 95/266
International ClassificationC11B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S203/11, C11B3/14
European ClassificationC11B3/14