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Publication numberUS3609338 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1971
Filing dateSep 18, 1968
Priority dateSep 18, 1968
Publication numberUS 3609338 A, US 3609338A, US-A-3609338, US3609338 A, US3609338A
InventorsKripp Robert M
Original AssigneeEsquire Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light fixture
US 3609338 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] inventor Robert M. Kripp Houston,'lex. [21] Appl. No. 760,566 [22] Filed Sept. 18, 1968 [45] Patented Sept. 28, 1971 [73] Assignee Esquire, Inc.

New York, N.Y.

[54] LIGHT FIXTURE 27 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl. 240/9, 240/78, 240/ 146, 240/ 147 [51] Int." F21s [50] Field of Search 240/78, 67, 68,146, 147,9

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 3,420,995 1/1969 Dunckel .s 240/78 H 2,597,875 5/1952 Kruger 240/78 2,829,243 4/1958 Stonehill 240/146 3,210,538 10/1965 Picha et a1. 240/78 3,228,645 1] 1966 Zurawski et al. 240/147 3,313,931 4/1967 Klugman 240/ 146 3,422,261 1/1969 McGinty et al. 240/78 Primary Examiner-Samuel Matthews Assistant Examiner-D. J. Clement Attorney-Hyer, Eickenroht, Thompson & Turner ABSTRACT: A light fixture assembly including an openended frame adapted to be disposed within a recess in a ceiling and a light fixture whose lower light-transmitting end is adapted to be received in the frame. A pair of extendible and retractable bars are mounted on the frame and extend generally horizontally along opposite sides thereof for supporting the frame from the ceiling when it is so disposed therein. A means is provided for adjusting the elevation of each bar relative to its adjacent side of the frame, and thus the elevation of the lower end of the frame relative to the lower end of the ceiling recess. The light fixture is supported from the frame, when it is so received therein, by means of rails extending along and connected to opposite sides of the frame by leveling screws which provide a fine adjustment for disposing the lower end of the fixture substantially flush with the ceiling. The separation between the lower ends of the ceiling recess and the fixture is normally covered by a trim plate which is suspended from the frame in such a manner that it may be lowered and then moved to a position permitting access to a light-transmitting window across the lower end of the housing whereby the window may be moved to a position pennitting relamping and the like within the fixture housing. The upper end of the fixture housing is narrower in its lower end so that it may be lifted above the supporting rails on the frame and tilted to a position for passing through the frame.

PATENIEDSEP28|97| SHEET 1 BF 4 Robert M Kripp INVENTOR A TTORNE Y5 PATENTEI] SEP28 I971 SHEET 2 BF 4 IN VE N TOR A TTOR NE YS PATENTED SEP28|971 09,33

sum 3 BF 4 Robert M. K ripp IN VE N TOR nnnnnnnnnnnnnni ATTORNEYS PATENTEnsiPzmsn 3,609,338

SHEET u or 4 FIG] 28c--\ I Robert M. Kripp INVENTOR Mead ATTORNEYS LIGHT FIXTURE This invention relates generally to a light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted in a recess in a ceiling; and, more particularly to an improved assembly of this type in which access may be had to the light fixture for relamping or other purposes from either above or below the ceiling. In one of its novel aspects, this invention relates to a frame especially well suited for mounting a light fixture in a ceiling recess.

In a conventional light fixture assembly of this general type, the light fixture itself is secured directly to the ceiling, so that the fixture itself is secured directly to the ceiling, so that the fixture must be specially constructed to provide such access from either location as well as to permit it to be so secured. Consequently, light fixtures which are adapted to be suspended beneath a ceiling or otherwise supported outside of a ceiling recess are generally not suited for use as recessed fixtures, at least without considerably structural alterations.

It is also necessary, as a practical matter, to be able to mount an assembly of this type in the recess of any one of a wide variety of ceiling constructions, which may vary in thicknesses as well as in spacing between horizontally extending support members. Conventional assemblies are not readily adaptable to the adjustments necessary for this purpose, a particularly, since the assembly essentially fills the recess. Also, even if the assembly is of such construction as to permit it to be so mounted, there is usually a further need for fine adjustment in order to dispose the lower end of the light fixture flush with the ceiling, whereby a trim plate for covering the separation between the lower ends of the fixture and recess will present a smooth appearance.

It is also conventional practice, in recessed assemblies of this type, to obtain access to the interior of the fixture from beneath the ceiling by disconnecting the trim plate from the assembly and lowering it and a window disposed across the lower end of the fixture. This is a fairly complicated, time consuming and ticklish task, especially due to the necessity of continuing to support the window in some way as the trim plate is disconnected and then reconnected. Furthermore with a drop-type window constructing, it is very difficult to render the fixture dustproof.

An object of this invention is to provide a recessed light fixture assembly which obviates man of the foregoing problems in that the light fixture thereof is readily accessible for relamping or other purposes from either above or below the ceiling, despite being of standard convention construction suitable for installation in other environments.

A more particular object is to provide such an assembly in which the light fixture need not be secured to the ceiling, and is easily and readily lifted above or lowered beneath the ceiling for relamping or other maintenance.

A further object is to provide such an assembly in which the light fixture may be mounted within any one of a wide variety of ceiling constructions, and, more particularly, in which the lower end of the fixture may be accurately leveled with respect to the ceiling even while the fixture is in place within the recess.

Yet another object is to provide such an assembly in which the trim plate may be lowered, in the process of obtaining access to the interior of the fixture, without the necessity of lowering the window of the fixture with it.

It is still more particularly object to provide such an assembly in which the trim plate serves to prevent the fixture from accidentally dropping through the ceiling recess in the process of obtaining access to it from below the ceiling.

Yet a further object is to provide such an assembly in which the light fixture is essentially dustproof These and other objects are accomplished, in accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, by an assembly which includes an open-ended frame adapted to be mounted within the recess, a light fixture adapted to have at least its lower end light transmitting end received in the frame, and means on the frame for supporting the fixtures as its lower and is lowered into it. Thus, the fixture need only be lifted from the frame to permit access to its interior for relamping or other purposes. Also, since the fixture is self-contained and requires no connection to the ceiling, it may be of a type adapted to be mounted in other environments, and thus of a conventional construction for use in such other environments.

In its preferred embodiment, the fixture comprises a housing having a window hingedly connected to one side of its lower end for swinging between positions opening and closing such end. Thus, the window may be swung down to open the lower end of the housing and permit the fixture to be relamped. This not only avoids the delicate relamping procedures usually encountered in assemblies of this type, but it also makes it possible to render the fixture dustproof.

Furthermore, the upper end of the fixture is narrower from one side to other than its lower end, so that it may be lifted above its support and tilted into a position in which it may be lowered through the frame and beneath the recess. In this latter position, access may be had to any portion of the fixture or, for that matter, to the area above the ceiling.

Preferably, the fixture is connected to the frame by a chain or the like so as to suspend it from the ceiling when lowered through the recess. Also, a ballast for the fixture is separate from it and electrically connected to it by a flexible cable, which permits the ballast to be semipermanently supported on the top of the ceiling to one side of the recess, regardless of the position of the fixture in or out of the frame. With the fixture lowered through the recess, as above mentioned, access may be had to the ballast from below the ceiling.

The fixture is supported on rails along opposite walls of the frame, and each rail is connected to the frame by a leveling screw near each of its ends so as to adjust the inclination as well as the elevation of the lower end of the fixture relative to the ceiling. More particularly, these screws are actuatable at both their upper and lower ends to permit this fine" adjustment to be made while the fixture is in place.

A trim plate is suspended from the frame in such a manner that it may be moved between upper and lower position permitting access to the window across the lower end of the fixture or permitting the fixture to be passed through the lower end of the frame. For this purpose, the trim plate is suspended on its opposite sides by means of rods which are supported from corresponding sides of the frame for extension and retraction with respect thereto in lowering and raising the plate, respectively. When the plate is lowered, one rod may be detached from the frame to permit the plate to swing downwardly to a depending position about the pivotal connection to the other rod. Alternatively, both rods may be detached from the frame.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters are designated by like parts:

FIG. I is a perspective view of the frame of the assembly supported from laterally extending ceiling support members which are shown in broken lines;

FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C are enlarged perspective views of various ways of supporting the opposite ends of the extendible and retractable bars on the frame from different types of ceiling structures;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the frame installed within a ceiling recess, and with the .light fixture mounted therein, as indicated in broken lines;

FIG. 4 is a detailed view of one side of the frame, as seen along broken line 44 of FIG. 3, and illustrating the means suspending the trim plate for movement between its raised and lowered positions;

FIG. 5 is a view of the frame similar to FIG. 3, but on a smaller scale and with the trim plate lowered and swung downwardly to a depending position and the window on the fixture also swung downwardly to open the lower end of the fixture housing for access to the interior thereof;

FIG. 6 is a view of the frame similar to FIG. 5, but with the window of the fixture closed and the fixture itself raised above its support on the frame and tilted to a position in which it may be lowered through the frame;

FIG. 7 is a top plan view of the frame and fixture, as seen in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a further view similar to FIG. 3 but with the light fixture lowered through the frame and suspended therefrom by a chain;

FIG. 9 is a detailed side view of a leveling screw connecting a rail to a side of the frame; and

FIG. 10 is a sectional view of a side of the frame and trim plate with the frame supported in the recess of a ceiling having a plaster lower wall.

With reference now to the above described drawings, and particularly to FIG. 3, the frame of the assembly is disposed within a recess having a lower portion 21 formed in the lower wall 22 of ceiling structure 23. The latter also includes laterally and longitudinally extending structural members 24 and 25, respectively, supporting the wall 22 and providing a grid. Thus, the upper portion of the recess merely extends through adjacent support members of the grid, so that the ceiling may be prepared for receiving the frame merely upon cutting its lower end 21 in the wall 22 for closely fitting about it. Obviously, the foregoing is merely illustrative of one type of a wide variety of ceiling structures which are conventional in this art.

At any rate, the frame 20 is open at each end of its four sides and is supported by the ceiling with its lower end disposed substantially flush with the lower end of the recess 21 in the ceiling and its upper end spaced inwardly from adjacent laterally extending ceiling support members 24 and 25. More particularly, in its illustrated embodiment, the frame has oppositely disposed sidewalls 26 and 27 which are of equal length to form a square for receiving the square lower end of a light fixture 28. Angles 29 are connected to the sides of the frame and extend upwardly at each comer of the frame.

As previously described, and as shown in the drawings, the frame is supported from the ceiling by means of bars 30 connected to and extending along the opposite sides 26 of the frame. More particularly, the opposite ends of the bars 30 extend beyond the other sides 27 of the frame for cooperation with the parts of the ceiling from which the bars are to be supported. Thus, the bottom walls of the opposite ends of the bars may merely rest on the top flange of the structural members 24 and be held with respect thereto by means of wires 31 wrapped around the structural members and the ends of the bars and then twisted at their free ends to tie the two together.

Each bar 30 comprises a pair of bar sections 32 which are longitudinally slidable with respect to one another for extending or retracting the effective end-to-end length of the bar. As best shown in FIG. 1, each bar section comprises an angle having a vertical flange which extends upwardly from a horizontal flange and has a slot 33 extending through a substantial portion of its length. More particularly, the slots 33 of the bar sections of each bar overlap and are aligned with one another so as to permit them to be releasably connected in a desired longitudinal position by means of a releasable clamp 34. Each such clamp comprises a bolt 35 having its head on the inner side of the bar 30, and a nut 36 on the threaded end of the bolt. Thus, the clamp 34 may be selectively tightened and loosened from either within or without the frame to permit the length of the bar to be adjusted and then fixed.

Each bar is connected to its adjacent side of the frame by means of similar clamps 37 extending through vertical slots 39 in the angular uprights 29 as well as through each slot 33 in the adjacent bar section. As in the case of the clamps 34, each of the clamps 37 include a threaded bolt 38 having its head on the inner side of the angles 29 and a nut over the end of the bolt. Thus these releasable clamps are also manipulatable from either within or without the frame to permit the bars 30 to be adjusted vertically with respect to the lower end of the frame, whereby the bars may be so installed with respect to the ceiling as to dispose the lower end of the fixture substantially flush with the lower end of the ceiling recess when the fixture is disposed within the frame.

As shown in detail in FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C, there is a vertical flange 32a on the end of each bar section providing a wall parallel to the sides 27 of the frame, and a vertical flange 32b along the outer edge of the horizontal flange of the bar section providing a wall parallel to the frame sides 26 outwardly of the vertical flange of such section. The vertical flange 32b is connected to the vertical flange of the bar section by another flange 32c, and the outer end 32d of the horizontal flange of the bar section provides a third wall which is parallel to the lower edges of the sidewalls of the frame. Each of these walls has a hole through it for use in securing it to a ceiling support member, as by a screw or the like, against which the wall rests. Obviously, still additional means may be provided on the bars for supporting the frame from the ceiling.

When the lower end of the light fixture 28 is received within the frame 20, it is supported therefrom by means of rails 40 which are connected to and extend longitudinally of the inner sides of the opposite sides 27 of the frame. Thus, as best shown in FIG. 3, the opposite sides of the fixture fit rather closely within the rails and have tabs 41 on their lower ends for resting upon the adjacent rails 40 as the fixture is lowered into the frame. More particularly, each rail 40 comprises an angle having a vertical flange which extends upwardly from its horizontal flange and is spaced inwardly from the side 27 of the frame. The close fit of the sides of the fixture to these sides 27 prevents substantial displacement of the fixture parallel to the sides 26 of the frame. However, as best shown in FIG. 7 and for reasons to be described hereinafter, the sides of the fixture opposite the sides 26 of the frame are spaced a fairly substantial distance therefrom. To prevent accidental displacement of the fixture parallel to the sides 27, recesses 42 (FIG. 1) are formed in the upper edge of the vertical flange for closely receiving the tabs 41.

As shown in FIG. 9, the opposite ends of each rail 40 are connected to the sides 27 of the frame by means of leveling screws 43 each having its opposite ends received through flanges 44 extending inwardly from the upper and lower ends of a plate 45 secured as by spot welding to the inner face of frame side 27. The intermediate length of each screw 43 is threadedly received through the lower flange of the rail 40 as well as a collar 46 welded to the bottom of the horizontal flange thereof. Thus, with an enlarged head 47 at the lower end of the screw and a nut 47a nonrotatable on its upper end holding it against vertical displacement relative to the frame, rotation of the screw will move the end of the rail 40 to which it is connected upwardly or downwardly.

In this manner, the four leveling screws enable each corner of the frame and the fixture 28 supported thereby to be selectively raised and lowered to adjust the elevation and inclination of the lower ends thereof in order to bring them into a substantially flush position with respect to the ceiling. More particularly, the head 47 of the leveling screw 43 is slotted so as to permit the screw to be manipulated from beneath the ceiling whereby this fine adjustment may be made while the light fixture is received within and supported by the frame 20. Thus, as will be apparent from the drawings, the leveling screws are disposed in the space between the sides of the light fixture and the sides 27 of the frame, so that they may be reached by a suitable tool.

The fixture 28 is preferably of substantially the same construction as the fixture shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,202,815. Thus, as shown in the drawings, it comprises a housing 28a which is substantially pyramidal in shape and has sidewalls tapering upwardly and inwardly from its lower end to an upper end of reduced lateral dimensions. A lamp (not shown is adapted to be received in the housing for transmitting light through a window 28b across the open lower end of the housing. One side of the window is hinged at 28c to a side of the fixture housing opposite a sidewall 27 of the frame, and the opposite side of the window is secured to the opposite side of the fixture housing by a releasable latch, such as a screw 28a. Upon release of the latch, the window may swing downwardly about its hinge, as shown in FIG. 5, to permit access to the interior of the housing for relamping or other purposes.

Due to the configuration of its housing, the fixture may be tilted, as illustrated in FIG. 6, to reduce the effective lateral width of its lower end, including the tabs 41, and thereby permit it to pass downwardly through the rails 40 on the sides 27 of the frame. The tilting need only be about an axis parallel to sides 27 of the frame because, as previously described, the sides of the fixture opposite the sides 26 of the frame are unsupported and spaced therefrom. In its lowered position, as shown in FIG. 8, all parts of the fixture are accessible from below the ceiling. Also, access may be had through the open frame to the area above the ceiling.

As previously described, a trim plate 50 is so suspended from the frame as to normally assume a raised position adjacent the ceiling and covering the separation between the lower ends of the fixture and the ceiling recess. Thus, as best shown in FIG. 3, the sides of a central opening 51 through the plate are disposed inwardly of the lower end edges of the window fixture 28, while the outer edges of the plate are disposed outwardly of the lower end of the recess with the ceiling. However, and as also previously described, the trim plate 50 is adapted to be lowered to the position indicated by broken lines in FIG. 3, and then moved to a position in which access may be had to the window of the fixture 28, as shown in FIG. 5, or in which the fixture may be passed through the frame, as shown in FIG. 6. Furthermore, and as will be appreciated from the drawings, removal of the trim plate to an out-of-the-way position also provides access to the lower ends of the leveling screws.

As best shown in FIGS. 1, 3, and 4, each side of the trim plate 50 adjacent a side 27 of the frame is suspended therefrom by means of a V-shaped rod 52. The upwardly diverging legs of each rod are received through a slot 54 extending longitudinally of a midportion of the horizontal flange of the rail 40 on one side of the frame, and the apex at the lower end of the rod is received through a ring 53 on the upper face of the adjacent side of the trim plate 50. As indicated by a comparison of the solid and broken line representations of the rod 52 in FIG. 4, its legs are normally urged outwardly at a wide included angle, which in turn normally urges the apex of Y the rod to its upper position, as limited by the engagement of the trim plate with the ceiling.

However, these legs of the rod may be forced inwardly toward one another and caused to slide along the ends of the slots 54 in the rail by a downward pull on the trim plate. This downward urging of the trim plate, and thus the inward stressing of the legs of the rod 52, is limited by engagement of hooks 55 on the free ends on the legs of the rod with the horizontal flange of the rail 40. Thus, the trim plate 50 provides protection against displacement of the fixture 28 through the frame. That is, should the tabs 41 of the frame not fit properly within the recesses of the rails 40, the trim plate would prevent it from falling down on a person below it. That is, the downward movement of the fixture through the frame would be limited to the extent of the downward movement of the trim plate 50 from its raised to its lowered position.

As previously described, when the trim plate has been moved to its lower position, it may be disconnected from one side of the frame to permit it to swing downwardly to a position permitting access to the window of the light fixture, as shown in FIG. 5, or permitting passage of the light fixture through the frame, as shown in FIG. 6. This one side of the trim plate may be so detached by lifting of the books 55 above the rail and further stressing of the free ends of the legs of the rod toward one another to permit thehooks to pass downwardly through the central slot 54. When the trim plate is so detached along its one side, the pivotal connection of the apex of the rod 52 at its other side to the trim plate 50 enables it to swing downwardly with respect to the frame to the depending position above described. Preferably, the rod 52 is turned upon itself at its apex to provide a ring for closely receiving the ring 53 on the trim plate.

Alternatively, of course, both sides of the trim plate may be detached from the frame so as to permit the trim plate to be moved completely out from under the frame. However, it is preferred that only one side of the trim plate be detached inasmuch as this simplifies both the detachment and subsequent attachment of the trim plate with respect to the frame. It also avoids the necessity of holding or putting the trim plate down while performing other operations with respect to the light fixture.

As previously described, and as illustrated in FIG. 5 when the trim plate has been swung downwardly to the depending position, access may be had to the lower light-transmitting end of the fixture 28. More particularly, access may be had to the screw 28d or other part of parts securing the free end of the window of the light fixture to its housing. When this free side of the window has been released, the window may be permitted to swing downwardly about the hinge 28: to the position shown in FIG. 5, whereby the lamp in the housing of the fixture may be replaced.

Alternatively, and as illustrated in FIG. 6, removal of the trim plate permits the light fixture 28 to be passed through the frame to a depending position beneath the frame, as illustrated in FIG. 8. In this latter position, various operations may be performed on the fixture or alternatively, access may be had through the open-ended frame to the area above the area above the ceiling. As illustrated in FIG. 6, the fixture 28 must first be lifted from its supported position to raise the tabs 41 above the rails 40, whereby it can be tilted prior to being lowered.

As will also be apparent from the drawings, the removal of the trim plate also permits easy access to the lower ends of the leveling screws 43. This is useful, for example, in the installation of the light fixture assembly, and particularly during the fine adjustment which is usually required in order to dispose the lower endof the fixture flush with the ceiling. That is, this fine adjustment involves some trial and error, during which the trim plate is moved back and forth between its raised position and its depending position in order to obtain access to the leveling screws for manipulating them.

The fixture 28 is also connected to frame by means of a chain 60 connecting at one end to the upper end of the fixture and at its other end to a hole 61 through the upper end of one angle 29 of the frame. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 8, the chain has sufficient slack to permit the fixture to be raised above supported position and then tilted and lowered through the lower end of the frame as well as to permit the fixture to be raised through the upper end of the frame to a position above the ceiling for relamping or other purposes. As illustrated in FIG. 8, it is nevertheless sufficiently short in length to prevent the fixture from falling substantially beyond a distance beneath the lower end of the frame necessary to permit access through the frame from beneath the ceiling.

As also shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, a ballast 62 for the fixture 28 may be supported on its side on an upper flange of a ceiling support member 25. The fixture is connected to the ballast 62 by means of a flexible cable 63 containing the necessary electrical conduits and having sufficient slack to permit manipulation of the fixture 28 in the manner previously described.

The ends of the angles 29 are provided with a series of holes 65 adjacent the corner thereof, which, as shown in FIG. 8, may be used to receive bolts 66 for fastening an angle plate 67 along the outer sides of the frame 20. In this way, the outwardly extending flange of the angle plate 67 may be used to support an upper wall 68 secured thereto by fasteners 69. The angle plate further provides an enclosed comer between it and the lower end of the angle 29 to permit a plaster wall 70 to be formed beneath the upper wall 68.

In the installation of the above described light fixture assembly, the ceiling is first prepared with a recess for closely receiving the frame 20. This may merely require the cutting of an opening 21 in the lower wall 22 of the ceiling, as described above in connection with the illustrative embodiment of this invention. In any case, upon formation of the recess in the ceiling, the frame 20 is disposed within the recess and the bars 39 are so arranged with respect to the ceiling support members as to support the frame with its lower end substantially flush with the lower end of the ceiling recess. The frame may be moved into position with the recess from either above or below the ceiling In the latter case, it may be necessary to first move the bars 30 to sufficiently retracted positions as to dispose their outer ends at least within the width of the sides 26 of the frame.

At any rate, with the frame disposed within the recess, the bars 30 along its opposite sides 26 may be extended and adjusted vertically in order to fit the particular support members of the ceiling. Furthennore, since these adjusting parts are manipulatable from either within or without the frame, they may be made from either below or above the ceiling. Obviously, the vertical adjustment is a somewhat rough one, although it should dispose the lower end of the supported frame at least substantially flush with the ceiling.

With the frame so supported, the fixture 28 and its ballast 62 may then be moved into supported positions on the frame and top of the ceiling, respectively. If desired, the fixture and ballast may be moved upwardly through the mounted frame from beneath the ceiling. For this purpose, the fixture would be tilted to the position indicated in FIGS. 6 and 7, and then moved upwardly through the lower end of the frame. The lower end of the fixture could then be swung to a generally level position and lowered to permit the tabs 41 to fit within the recesses 42 of the supporting rails of the frame.

in order to more accurately adjust the lower end of the supported fixture with respect to the ceiling, the leveling screws 43 are selectively manipulated to raise or lower one or more of the comers of the supporting rails 40 and thus the fixture 28. During the leveling process, it may be necessary to attach the trim plate 50 to the frame and move it upwardly to its raised position. The trim plate is so attached by a reversal of the above described detachment procedure. That is, the free ends of the legs of the rod 52 are pressed toward one another so as to permit them to be passed upwardly through the slot 54 in the supporting rail. At this time, the stress in the legs of the rod is relieved to permit the legs to move outwardly into engagement with the opposite ends of the slot 54, at which time the trim plate may be easily moved between raised and lowered positions.

From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention is one well adapted to attain all of the ends and objects hereinabove set forth, together with other advantages which are obvious and which are inherent to the apparatus.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed with reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

The invention having been described, what is claimed is:

1. For use in mounting a light fixture within a recess in a ceiling, apparatus including an open-ended frame adapted to be disposed within the recess and to receive at least the lower end of a light fixture therein, means on the frame for supporting the fixture when so received, a pair of extendible and retractable bars mounted on the frame and extending generally horizontally along opposite sides thereof, means for adjusting the elevation of each bar relative to its adjacent side of the frame, and means on each bar for use in supporting it from a portion of the ceiling so as to mount the frame within the recess when it is so disposed therein, said bar-supporting means including means at each end of the bar providing a horizontal wall and a pair of vertical walls extending longitudinally and transversely, respectively, of the bar, each wall having means thereon for use in securing it to a portion of the ceiling.

2. For use in' mounting a light fixture in a recess in a ceiling, apparatus including a open-ended frame disposable within the recess for receiving at least the lower end of a light fixture therein, means on the frame for mounting it within the recess when so disposed therein, a rail on each of two opposite sides of the frame for supporting the fixture when so received therein, and a pair of leveling screws connecting each rail near its opposite ends to its respective side of the frame for adjusting the elevation and inclination of each rail relative to the lower end of the frame.

3. Apparatus of the character defined in claim 2, wherein each leveling screw has means on one end for manipulating it from below said ceiling when said fixture is received in said frame.

4. Apparatus of the character defined in claim 2, wherein the upper edge of each rail has a part to receive a complementary part on the fixture so as to prevent displacement of the fixture longitudinally of the rail.

5. Apparatus of the character defined in claim 2, including a trim plate for covering the separation between the lower ends of the ceiling recess and fixture, and means removably suspending the trim plate from the rails in a position for covering said separation.

6. Apparatus of the character defined in claim 2, wherein the mounting means for the frame includes means for adjusting the elevation of the lower end of the frame relative to the ceiling.

7. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted in a recess in a ceiling, comprising a light fixture having a light transmitting window across its lower end, an open-ended frame adapted to be disposed within the recess and to receive at least the lower end of light fixture therein, means for mounting the frame within said recess when so disposed, and means on the frame for supporting the lower end of the fixture when it is so received, said fixture having an upper end which is narrower from one side to the other than its lower end to permit it to be tilted into a position in which it may be passed through said supporting means.

8. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim 7, including a ballast adapted to be supported above the ceiling to one side of the recess, and an electrical cable connecting the fixture and ballast with sufficient slack to permit the fixture to be lowered beneath the ceiling.

9. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim 7, including means for suspending the fixture from the frame when it has been lowered through said supporting means into a position beneath said ceiling.

10. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim 7, including a trim plate, and means suspending the trim plate from the frame for covering the separation between the lower ends of the fixture and recess, said suspending means being movable to a position to permit said fixture to be passed through the recess.

11. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted in a recess in a ceiling, comprising a light fixture including a housing and a window hingedly connected along one side to one side of the housing and having means on another side for releasably connecting it to another side of the housing for closing the lower end of the housing, an open-ended frame adapted to be disposed within the recess and to receive at least the lower end of a light fixture therein, means for mounting the frame within said recess when so disposed, means on the frame for supporting the lower end of the fixture when it is so received, and a trim plate, and means suspending the trim plate from the frame for movement between a raised position covering the separation between the lower ends of the ceiling recess and fixture and a lowered position in which access may be had to the means releasably connecting the window to the housing and in which the window may be swung downwardly to open the lower end of the housing.

12. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted in a recess in a ceiling, comprising a light fixture having a window in its lower end, an open-ended frame adapted to be disposed within the recess and to receive at least the lower end of a light fixture therein, means for mounting the frame within said recess when so disposed, and means on the frame for supporting the lower end of the fixture when it is so received, said frame mounting means including means for adjusting the elevation of the lower end of the frame relative to the lower end of the ceiling recess, and said fixture supporting means including means for adjusting the elevation and inclination of the lower end of the fixture relative to the lower end of the frame.

13. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim [2, wherein said first-mentioned adjusting means includes parts manipulatable from within the frame when the frame is in the ceiling recess.

14. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim 12, wherein said second-mentioned adjusting means includes parts manipulatable from below said ceiling when the frame is in the ceiling recess and the fixture is in the frame.

15. A light fixture assembly of the character defined in claim 14, including a trim plate suspended from the frame for movement between a raised position covering the secondmentioned adjusting parts manipulatable from below said ceiling and a lowered position permitting access thereto.

16. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted within a recess in a ceiling, comprising an open-ended frame adapted to be received within the ceiling recess, means on the frame for supporting the frame from the ceiling when so received therein, a separate, enclosed light fixture having a lamp socket mounted thereon and a window on one end opposite the lamp socket, at least a portion of said fixture adapted to be received within the frame with its window disposed at the lower end thereof, means on the frame for supporting the light fixture when so received, and means on the frame for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame from beneath the ceiling and from within the frame when the fixture is supported thereby.

17. An assembly of the character defined in claim 16, wherein said adjusting means includes means for adjusting the inclination of said light fixture supporting means from beneath the ceiling when the fixture is supported thereby.

18. An assembly of the character defined in claim 16, including means for adjusting the elevation ofthe frame supporting means with respect to the frame.

19. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted within a recess in a ceiling, comprising an open-ended frame adapted to be received within the ceiling recess, means on the frame for supporting the frame from the ceiling when so received therein, a separate, enclosed light fixture having a lamp socket mounted thereon and a window on one end opposite the lamp socket, at least a portion of said fixture adapted to be received within the frame with its window disposed at the lower end thereof, means on the frame for supporting the light fixture when so received, and means on the frame for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame from above and beneath the ceiling and from within the frame when the fixture is supported thereby.

20. An assembly of the character defined in claim 19, wherein said adjusting means includes means for adjusting the inclination of said light fixture supporting means from beneath the ceiling when the fixture is supported thereby.

21. An assembly of the character defined in claim 19, in-

10 cluding means for adjusting the elevation of the frame-supporting means with respect to the frame.

22. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted within a recess in a ceiling, comprising an open-ended frame adapted to be received within the ceiling recess, means on the frame for supporting the frame from the ceiling when so received therein, a separate, enclosed light fixture having a lamp socket mounted thereon and a window on one end opposite the lamp socket, at least a portion of said fixture adapted to be received Within the frame with its window disposed at the lower end thereof, means on the frame for supporting the light fixture when so received, means on the frame for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame, and means for adjusting the elevation of said frame supporting means with respect to the frame.

. An assembly of the character defined in claim 22,

wherein said frame-supporting means includes extendible and retractable bars on the frame.

24. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted within a recess in a ceiling, comprising an open-ended frame adapted to be received within the ceiling recess, means on the frame for supporting the frame from the ceiling when so received therein, a separate, enclosed light fixture having a lamp socket mounted thereon and a window on one end opposite the lamp socket, at least a portion of said fixture adapted to be received within the frame with its window disposed at the lower end thereof, means on the frame for supporting the light fixture when so received, means on the frame for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame, a trim plate, and means suspending the trim plate from the frame for movement between a raised position in which it covers the separation between the lower ends of the recess and the fixture and a lowered position beneath the separation.

25. An assembly of the character defined in claim 24, wherein the means for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame includes means manipulatable from beneath the ceiling when the fixture is supported thereby and the trim plate is moved to its lowered position.

26. An assembly of the character defined in claim 24 wherein the means for adjusting the elevation of the light fixture supporting means with respect to the frame includes means manipulatable from above and beneath the ceiling when the fixture is supported thereby and the trim plate is moved to its lowered position.

27. A light fixture assembly adapted to be mounted in a recess in a ceiling, comprising an open-ended for adapted to be disposed within the recess and to receive at least the lower end of a light fixture therein, means on the frame for mounting the frame within said recess when so disposed, means on the frame for supporting the lower end of the fixture when it is so received, means on the frame for adjusting the elevation of the frame-mounting means relative to the lower end of the frame, and means on the frame for adjusting the elevation and inclination of the fixture-supporting means relative to the lower end of the frame.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3810085 *Mar 29, 1973May 7, 1974Lightolier IncAdjustable lighting fixture for hung ceiling installation
US5623789 *Sep 12, 1994Apr 29, 1997Kidwell; Steven A.Pitch stabilizing, positionable eaves-overhang light support assembly
US6076788 *Jun 22, 1998Jun 20, 2000Cooper IndustriesReinforced hanger bar
US7234674May 23, 2005Jun 26, 2007Genlyte Thomas Group, Llc3-way adjustment mechanism for downlight fixture
US7234832Mar 4, 2005Jun 26, 2007Hubbell IncorporatedAdjustable lighting fixture
US7413323May 2, 2007Aug 19, 2008Hubbell IncorporatedAdjustable lighting fixture
US7618166Jul 18, 2008Nov 17, 2009Number Eight Lighting CompanyLight fixture lamp holder and modular trim assembly therefor
US7673841Mar 25, 2005Mar 9, 2010Cooper Technologies CompanyHangar bar for recessed luminaires with integral nail
US8240630Apr 28, 2010Aug 14, 2012Cooper Technologies CompanyHanger bar for recessed luminaires with integral nail
US8511867 *Jul 22, 2011Aug 20, 2013Cooper Technologies CompanyApparatus and method for providing adjustable lip heights for plaster applications on a ceiling surface
US8622361Jul 27, 2012Jan 7, 2014Cooper Technologies CompanyHanger bar for recessed luminaires with integral nail
US8727582Jul 12, 2007May 20, 2014Abl Ip Holding LlcRecessed lighting fixture with alignment enhancements and methods for mounting same
US20130128158 *Nov 23, 2011May 23, 2013Shenzhen China Star Optoelectronics Technology Co. ,LTD.Flat Panel Display Device, Stereoscopic Display Device, and Plasma Display Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/366, 362/367, 362/311.6
International ClassificationF21V21/02, F21V21/04
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/04
European ClassificationF21V21/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 30, 1983AS20Assign the entire interest
Free format text: WIDE-LITE INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 606, SAN MARCOS, TX. 78666, LOCATE * ESQUIRE, INC. : 19830916
Sep 30, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: WIDE-LITE INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION, P.O. BOX 606,
Free format text: ASSIGNS THE ENTIRE INTEREST. SUBJECT TO AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 30,1983;ASSIGNOR:ESQUIRE, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004190/0815
Effective date: 19830916