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Publication numberUS3609795 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1971
Filing dateOct 20, 1969
Priority dateOct 8, 1969
Publication numberUS 3609795 A, US 3609795A, US-A-3609795, US3609795 A, US3609795A
InventorsFielder William V Jr, Znamirowski Henry
Original AssigneeEastern Prod Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drapery carrier for maintaining drapery heading in upright position
US 3609795 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 5, 1971 ZNAMIRQWSKI ETAL 3,609,795

DRAPERY CARRIER FOR MAINTAINING DRAPERY HEADING IN UPRIGHT POSITION Filed Oct. 20, 1969 ETORS HENRY Zwmmowsm WNW Ams.

WILLIAM VANBURAN FIELDERJR.

United States Patent DRAPERY CARRIER FOR MAINTAINING DRAPERY HEADING IN UPRIGHT POSITIQN Henry Znamirowski, Ellicott City, and William V. Fielder,

Jr., Frederick, Md., assignors to Eastern Products Corporation, Columbia, Md.

Filed Oct. 20, 1969, Ser. No. 867,677 Int. Cl. A47h 15/04 US. Cl. 1687.4 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A carrier for a drapery hook having an upper portion which engages the track of the drapery rod and having a lower portion terminating in a front wall, the wall being in the form of a vertical trough having an upper edge so that when a hook is hung on the upper edge, the heel of the hook is supported by the trough to overcome the tendency toward forward toppling and thereby to maintain the heading of the drapery upright.

A style of drapery hook in common usage is of inverted U shape having an arched center with a drapery engaging leg on the front side terminating in a heel and a free leg on the back side. In the carrier disclosed in the prior Lydard Patent 3,324,501, which issued June 13, 1967, the hook is supported at its central arch and a barrier is provided for engaging the free leg of the hook to prevent the free leg from swinging backwardly about the region of support for the purpose of keeping the heading of the drapery upright. Such mode of support might be considered to be indirect since it assumes that all of the books in a series are of the same shape and have the same spacing between the legs. Where the spacing between the legs varies, the degree of uprightness of the heading will also vary.

It is the object of the present invention to provide a carrier for a drapery hook in which the leg of the hook which supports the drapery heading is directly engaging thus insuring that the drapery heading will be held upright in spite of variation in the shape of the hook. It is more specifically an object of the present invention to provide a carrier having a front wall of vertical trough shape for direct engagement not only of the hook but also of the drapery fabric so as to limit swiveling of the hook about a vertical axis and to keep the drapery faced forwardly at the region of attachment to the hook.

It is a general object of the invention to provide a carrier for a drapery hook which is inherently inexpensive, which may be produced as a simple piece of molded plastic, which is easily engaged by a book when the draperies are installed and easily removed when the drapery must be taken down for cleaning or the like, and which is capable of accommodating hooks in a wide variety of shape and condition.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon considering the attached detailed description and upon reference to the drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a view, in elevation, of a drapery hook carrier constructed in accordance with the invention mounted on a rod and supporting a hook and drapery heading;

FIG. 2 is a back view of the carrier shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a vertical section taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a top view of the carrier; and

FIG. 5 shows the carrier as viewed from the bottom;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary section showing an alternate construction.

While the invention has been described in connection with a preferred embodiment, it will be understood that ice we do not intend to be limited to the particular embodiment shown but intend on the contrary to cover the various alternative and equivalent constructions included within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Referring now to the drawing and particularly to FIG. 1, a carrier 10 constructed in accordance with the invention is shown mounted in the track 11 of a drapery rod 12. The carrier supports a hook 13 of well known type having a free leg 14 and a front leg 15 or shank arranged generally parallel to one another with an arched center portion 16 in between. The shank is reversely bent at a heel 17 to form an upwardly extending sharpened pin 18. The pin is seated in a gathered portion of a drapery heading 20 formed along the upper edge of a drapery 21.

Turning attention to the carrier, it is preferably formed of a single molded piece of plastic, for example, nylon, high density polyethylene, or any other molded plastic having similar characteristics of strength and durability. The carrier has an upper portion 22 mounting a disc 23 having a neck 24 which is registered with the track 11 of the rod for free sliding movement.

Extending forwardly and downwardly from portion 22, in dog leg shape, is an arm portion 30 having a pair of laterally spaced side walls 31, 32 (see FIGS. 4 and 5) and a vertically extending front wall 33.

In accordance with the present invention, the drapery hook is supported on the upper edge of the front wall and the wall is formed of shallow trough-like cross section for directly engaging the heel of the hook to maintain the hook and drapery heading upright against any tendency to topple forwardly and for keeping the hook in vertical alinement with the carrier. Further in accordance with the invention, means are provided at the back of the front wall for substantially filling the space between the legs of the hook and for taking up lost motion to inhibit bodily rocking of the hook about the supporting edge to insure that the heel of the hook is maintained in seated position in the trough. Thus it will be seen in FIG. 4 that the front wall 33 is in the form of a shallow vertical trough having lateral edges 34, 35 and a central valley 36 with an upper or supporting edge 37. To the rear of the edge 37 is a clearance opening 38 for admission of the free leg of the hook. Integrally formed on the back side of the front wall 33 is a protuberance, or a lug, 40 which projects out into engagement, or near engagement, with the free leg 14 of the hook when the hook is in seated position. The lug 40 preferably has a downwardly sloping surface 41 for guiding the tip of the leg 14 of the hook rearwardly into its final position when the hook is installed. The lug 40 moreover is of arcuate contour, when viewed from the top (FIG. 4), thereby conforming, to some extent, to the arcuate contour of the trough. This permits the hook to have a certain amount of angular freedom, as shown in FIG. 5, when supported on the edge 37 of the carrier. It should be noted, however, that it is one of the features of the present construction that the lateral edges 34, 35 of the trough engage the back side of the heading with equalized pressure, thus tending to keep the heading forwardly oriented at the region of attachment and not twisted with respect to the carrier.

It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the construction described above holds the drapery heading vertical by reason of direct engagement between the heel 17 of the front leg 15 of the hook in spite of a wide variation in hook configuration, due either to the preferences of various hook manufactures or due to the fact that the hook has been bent out of shape incident to usage. All hooks, however, have a supporting arch and a heel at the lower end of the front leg, and it is engagement at these two points which achieves the desired uprightness in the present construction. The uprightness is not affected by the fact that a given hook may be longer or shorter, the fact that a given hook may be of different specific shape or the fact that a given hook may be deformed by having its legs squeezed together or spread apart. Where the legs are too close together, the free or rear leg 14 will simply ride up upon the angled surface 41 until the hook is fully seated by reason of the weight of the drapery. Where the hook has been inadvertently spread apart, a small space may exist between the lug 40 and the rear leg 14 without in any way affecting the uprightness of the hook which has been established by engagement at points 16, 17. The construction is therefore to be distinguished from that disclosed in the earlier patent where uprightness is achieved indirectly by positioning the free leg of the hook and where bending of the free leg out of position may cause the heading to occupy an angled position forwardly or backwardly from the vertical.

The present carrier is strong enough to support the heaviest of drapery materials, but it is nevertheless of light construction requiring a minimum of raw material. The strength is due to the box-like construction, utilizing extensive side walls and a front wall which is inherently rigid by reason of its trough shape. The arm portion of the carrier, in the region of the dog leg, is reinforced by a web 50 extending between the walls, and the upper portion is additionally reinforced by transversely extending webs 51. Webs 52, of circular contour, reinforce the device at the region of the track-engaging neck 24 which supports the retaining disc 23.

Also While the front wall 33 is preferably longer than the shank 15 of the hook for engagement and support of the heel 17, it will be understood that if desired, the front wall 33 may be shortened and provided with a supporting surface which engages the shank of the hook at a region spaced upwardly from the heel. Thus referring to FIG. 6, which shows a vertical section similar to that in FIG. 3, it will be noted that the hook is foreshortened or trimmed at the bottom and that an integral supporting surface 36a is provided which engages the shank at a region which is spaced substantially downwardly from the arch 16 but nevertheless upwardly from the heel 17. Otherwise, corresponding portions of the carrier are indicated by corresponding reference numerals with the addition of subscript a. It will be understood that the term shank as used herein includes all of that portion 15 of the hook which lies upwardly of the heel 17.

Moreover, while the preferred construction includes a continuous front wall 33, it will be understood by one skilled in the art that the wall 33 need not be continuous from top to bottom provided that there is a bridging portion at the upper edge 37 for engaging the arch of the hook and provided that there is a bridging portion spaced below it for engaging the heel or shank of the hook, thereforward-1y and downwardly extending arm portion integrally joined thereto, said arm portion having generally parallel side walls spaced from one another and a front wall, the front wall being in the form of a vertically extensive trough terminating in an upper edge, means defining an opening behind the upper edge to provide access to the space between the walls so that when the hook is hung with its central arch engaging the upper edge with the free leg in the opening the heel of the hook is supported against the presented valley surface of the trough thereby to maintain the hook and the heading which is secured thereto upright against forward toppling, and means attached to the front of the upper portion for slidably engaging the track of a drapery rod.

2. A drapery carrier for receiving and supporting a drapery hook of inverted U-shape having an arched center with a drapery engaging leg on the front side terminating in a heel and a free leg on the back side comprising, in combination, a vertically extending upper portion and a forwardly and downwardly extending arm portion integrally joined thereto, said arm portion having generally parallel side walls and a front wall, the front wall being in the form of a vertical trough having an upper edge so that when the hook is hung with its central arch engaging the upper edge the heel of the hook is supported against the presented valley surface of the trough, means on the back side of the front wall for engaging the free leg of the hook, thereby to take up the space between the legs of the hook to insure that the heel of the hook remains seated in the trough, and means attached to the front of the upper portion for slidably engaging the track of a drapery rod,

3. A drapery carrier for receiving and supporting a drapery hook of inverted U-shape having an arched center with a drapery engaging leg on the front side terminating in a heel and a free leg on the back side comprising, in combination, a vertically extending upper portion and a forwardly and downwardly extending arm portion integrally joined thereto, said arm portion having generally parallel side walls and a front wall, the front wall being in the form of a vertical trough having an upper edge so that when the hook is hung with its central arch engaging the upper edge the heel of the hook is supported against the presented valley surface of the trough, the trough being of arcuate cross section, a lug of arcuate contour on the back side of the front Wall for engaging the free leg of the hook and for bridging the space between the legs of the hook thereby to limit rocking of the hook in either direction about its central arch, and means attached to the front of the upper portion for slidably engaging the track of a drapery rod.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,815,526 12/1957 Rosenzweig 1687.4 R 3,314,100 4/1967 Znamirowski l6-87.4 R 3,324,501 6/1967 Lydard l6-87.4 R

BOBBY R. GAY, Primary Examiner D. F. MARQUETTE, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 16-93

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3750738 *Sep 21, 1971Aug 7, 1973Powers JDrapery support system
US3943598 *Sep 16, 1974Mar 16, 1976Roper CorporationArm construction for drapery master slide
US3997944 *Sep 29, 1975Dec 21, 1976Carl Ferman PhillipsDrapery hook for maintaining a drapery heading in upright position
US5611111 *Nov 30, 1995Mar 18, 1997Forest Group Nederland B.V.Curtain rail glider
US5950278 *Jan 28, 1998Sep 14, 1999Collins; Thomas L.Drapery support and drawing structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/87.40R, 16/93.00R, 16/93.00D
International ClassificationA47H15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47H15/00
European ClassificationA47H15/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 30, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC., A CORP. OF ONTARI
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., 1001 FANNIN, SUITE 4000,
Effective date: 19870428
Apr 30, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES, INC., 1001 FANNIN, SUITE 4000,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:COOPER INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC., A CORP. OF ONTARIO;REEL/FRAME:004709/0711
Effective date: 19870428
Apr 17, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC., 20 QUEEN STREET W
Effective date: 19870227
Owner name: ROPER CORPORATION
Apr 17, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC., 20 QUEEN STREET W
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ROPER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004701/0823
Effective date: 19870227
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROPER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004701/0823
Owner name: COOPER INDUSTRIES (CANADA) INC., A CORP. OF ONTAR