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Publication numberUS3611908 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1971
Filing dateMar 17, 1970
Priority dateNov 14, 1969
Publication numberUS 3611908 A, US 3611908A, US-A-3611908, US3611908 A, US3611908A
InventorsHendrik J Spoormaker
Original AssigneeHendrik J Spoormaker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air-conditioning terminal units
US 3611908 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent lnventor Hendrik J. Spoormaker 56 Dorado Street, Waterkloof Ridge, Pretoria, South Africa Appl. No. 20,191

Filed Mar. 17, 1970 Patented Oct. 12, 1971 Priority Nov. 14, 1969 r at i a 55894/69 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No.

753,564, Aug. 19, 1968, now abandoned.

AIR-CONDITIONING TERMINAL UNITS 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 98/38X, 98/40 D, 137/604 Int. Cl 1. F24f 13/06 Field of Search ..98/38, 38 B,

38 E, 38 V, 40 D, 40 DL; 236/13, 49; 137/604 [56] References Cited Primary Examiner-William E. Wayner Attorney-Munson & Fiddler ABSTRACT: The invention provides an air-conditioning terminal unit for use in a room topped by a false ceiling so as to provide a substantially constant air flow into the room and to take advantage, when necessary, of heat that passes from the room into the ceiling space. In the unit, conditioned air is caused to flow through induction nozzles into a discharge chamber which induces air from the ceiling space to flow into the room. A stream of conditioned air, usually from the same source, is passed along a passage containing a damper in opposition to the induced air, so that when the damper is fully open, no air is induced from the ceiling space and when the damper is closed, full induction is possible.

PATfiNTEnncnamn 3,511,90

sum 1 or 3 HENDRIX JACOBUS SPOORMAKER,

Inventor MUNSON & FIDDLER,

Attorneys PATE-NIEDucnmn 3.611.90

sum 3 [1F 3 a I I e 32 3Q 42 42 A 40 4o-- HENDRIX JACOBUS SPOORMAKER Inventor MUNSON 8| FIDDLER,

Attorneys AIR-CONDITIONING TERMINAL UNITS This invention relates to improvements in air-conditioning terminal units and is a continuation-in-part of the present applicants U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 753,564 filed on the 19th of Aug. 1968 now abandoned.

In modern buildings false ceilings are commonly used, the space above the ceilings being used for containing utilities such as air-conditioning ducts. A fair amount of heated air collects, or is formed by electric lights, adjacent the ceiling of any room. It has thus occurred to air-conditioning engineers to utilize at least some of this hot air at times of low ambient temperatures.

Thus in US. Pat. Specification No. 3,114,505 it has been proposed to utilize the heat from light fittings to supplement the heating load on an air-conditioning system, when required. In the system there proposed, heat from light fittings is induced into an air-conditioning terminal unit. Both the induced air and the primary conditioned air are controlled by dampers which move in unison and in opposite directions so that as the primary air flow is increased, the induced air flow is reduced. While this proposal was an important development, the terminal unit is clumsy and complicated.

An object of the invention is to provide a method of air conditioning which will enable the use of a much simpler terminal unit and also to provide a unit suitable for use in the method.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a section through one embodiment of a unit according to the invention,

FIG. 2 is a section through a further embodiment, and

FIG. 3 is a section through still another embodiment.

In FIG. 1 a conditioned air plenum 2 is connected to induction noules 3 of conventional or suitable design. The nozzles 3 discharge into a discharge chamber 4 discharging at ceiling level through a louvred aperture 5.

Room air is drawn in through a louvred aperture 6, passes along the cavity of a light fitting 7 and through an aperture 8 in the side of the discharge chamber 4.

The nozzles 3 are so chosen that aperture delivers a substantially constant volume of air, required to maintain a satisfactory room air movement, while supplying the minimum amount of ventilation air.

A passage 9 fitted with an air volume control valve 10 leads from the plenum 2 to the discharge chamber 4. Flow of air along the passage 9 into the chamber 4 inhibits flow of air through the aperture 8. The conditions are so arranged and the aperture sizes so chosen that the inhibition is in proportion to the quantity of air flowing from the passage 9. Thus, air circulation in the room below is kept substantially constant while the supply of conditioned air may vary from the constant minimum volume to a maximum volume when the valve 10 is fully open.

As can be seen, in the embodiment of FIG. 1, hot air from a particular light fitting passes through the terminal unit, when required.

The embodiment of FIG. 2 is designed to draw hot air from above the ceiling space regardless of the source of the heat. Thus the ceiling will have apertures, preferably associated with light fittings, to allow room air to pass into the ceiling space.

In this embodiment there is a plenum 12 leading to induction nozzles 13. The nozzles 13 discharge into a discharge chamber 14 discharging at the level of a ceiling 21 through a louvred aperture 15.

Air from above the ceiling 21 is drawn through an aperture 18 in the side of chamber 14.

Again the nozzles 13 are so chosen that the aperture delivers a substantially constant volume of air while supplying a minimum amount ofventilation.

An aperture 22 fitted with a damper leads from the plenum 12 to a passage 19 into the chamber 14. When the damper 20 is open, flow from the passage 19 inhibits flow of air through the aperture 18. Once more apertures are so chosen and conditions so arranged that inhibition is in proportion to the quantity of air flowing from the passage 19.

Thus the operation of one control 10 or 20 allows for full control for the conditions under which the terminal units of the invention are designed to operate.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3 there are two conditioned air ducts 30 and 31. The duct 30 delivers conditioned air to a box 32 which through induction nozzles 33 flows via a space 34 through louvred apertures 5 to the room to be conditioned. The duct 31 delivers to a plenum 43 from which there leads two passages 42 controlled by dampers 40. The dampers 40 act in unison. Finally apertures 38 in the sides of the chamber 34 allow air from above the ceiling 21 to enter the chamber 34.

In use air conveyed by the ducts 30 and 31 will be conditioned to different extents. Thus the air in the duct 31 may be colder than the air in the duct 30. In this case also the nozzles 33 are so chosen that the apertures 5 deliver a constant volume of air while supplying the minimum amount of ventilation. The apertures 38 are so chosen and conditions so arranged that when the dampers 40 are open, flow through the passages 42 inhibits flow of air through the apertures 38. The degree of inhibition is again proportional to the quantity of air flowing from the plenum 43.

I claim:

1. An air-conditioning terminal unit adapted to be mounted above a ceiling in an overhead space, which the ceiling separates from the living space of a room, comprising:

a. a discharge chamber defined by a base, sides and a top,

b. a first opening in the base of the chamber adapted to be disposed adjacent an opening in the ceiling for delivering air directly into the living space,

a constantly open second opening in one side of the discharge chamber above the first opening for receiving air from the overhead space,

d. conduit means connected to a source of conditioned air,

. discharge means connected to said conduit means and including nozzle means for increasing the velocity of said conditioned air, said nozzle means being located in the top of the chamber adjacent the second opening for projecting a stream of the conditioned air through said chamber and contiguous with the second opening towards the first opening so as to induce and entrain air through the second opening from the overhead space into the stream of conditioned air for delivery of the combined air from the nozzle means and from the second opening through the first opening into the living space,

f. air passage means connected to said conduit means and including a discharge opening located adjacent said nozzle means and on the opposite side thereof from said second opening, and a throttle valve in the air passage means for controlling the passage of air through the discharge opening,

g. the relative flow capacities of said discharge means, air passage means and second opening being arranged such with adjustment of said throttle valve the increase or decrease in the volume of air passing through said air passage means and discharge opening is substantially equal to the decrease or increase, respectively, in the combined volume of air passing through said discharge means including nozzle means and said second opening, whereby the flow of air through said first opening into the living space may be maintained substantially constant.

2. The terminal unit claimed in claim 1 in which the second opening communicates with a light fixture defining a heatretaining chamber through which air is drawn.

3. The terminal unit claimed in claim 2 in which the light fixture includes a downwardly facing transparent cover forming part of the heat-retaining chamber and through which light is transmitted to the living space.

3. An air-conditioning terminal unit adapted to be mounted above a ceiling in an overhead space, which the ceiling separates from the living space of a room, comprising:

a housing;

a discharge chamber defined by the housing and having a base, sides and a top;

a first opening in the base of the chamber adapted to be disposed adjacent an opening in the ceiling for delivering air directly into the living space;

constantly open second opening means in sidewalls of the chamber for receiving air from the overhead space; an upper portion of the housing adapted for receiving secon dary air from one source at a predetermined temperature for delivery downwardly toward the first opening;

a box between the upper portion of the housing and the chamber;

means for connecting the box to another source of conditioned air, being a source of primary air;

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3114505 *Jan 23, 1963Dec 17, 1963Barber Colman CoAir conditioning apparatus
US3390720 *Jul 6, 1966Jul 2, 1968Lithonia Lighting IncComfort conditioning system
US3516606 *Aug 7, 1969Jun 23, 1970Allied Thermal CorpAir-conditioning temperature volume controller
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3823870 *Dec 27, 1971Jul 16, 1974Kilpatrick & CoAir conditioning with mixing duct
US3841206 *Sep 11, 1973Oct 15, 1974Is Inc Systems CoMultiple zone building structure
US3883071 *Dec 18, 1972May 13, 1975Meckler GershonMixing box and control therefor
US3895567 *Aug 8, 1973Jul 22, 1975Paul WernerAir outlet arrangement for air conditioning and ventilating apparatus
US3929285 *Mar 25, 1974Dec 30, 1975Daugherty Jr Carl FrancisAir conditioning system
US4084389 *Oct 26, 1976Apr 18, 1978Gershon MecklerAir conditioning apparatus
US4090434 *Mar 7, 1977May 23, 1978Connor Engineering & Manufacturing, Inc.Variable induction apparatus with a primary fluid flow controlled induction damper
US4249461 *Jun 21, 1979Feb 10, 1981Christenson Larry EVentilating system for a livestock building
US4276817 *Aug 1, 1979Jul 7, 1981Gershon MecklerAir bar assembly
US4315412 *May 19, 1980Feb 16, 1982Gershon MecklerAir conditioning apparatus utilizing solar energy and method
US4446774 *Feb 12, 1982May 8, 1984Gershon MecklerAir conditioning apparatus
US4470342 *May 10, 1982Sep 11, 1984Hall Jr William KAir-handling unit
US4703685 *Jul 2, 1981Nov 3, 1987Gershon MecklerAir bar assembly
US4858519 *Feb 26, 1987Aug 22, 1989Gershon MecklerMixing box
US4913036 *Jan 23, 1989Apr 3, 1990Gershon MecklerMixing box
US7013969 *Jul 9, 2004Mar 21, 2006Loudermilk Kenneth JLow noise level HVAC system having displacement with induction
US8469783Jan 9, 2007Jun 25, 2013Halton OySupply air terminal device and method for regulating the airflow rate
US20100240295 *Mar 20, 2009Sep 23, 2010Salman AkhtarAir handling system
EP0094000A1 *May 3, 1983Nov 16, 1983Schako Metallwarenfabrik Ferdinand Schad KGWindow ventilation apparatus for ventilation and air conditioning installations
EP0115674A2 *Nov 17, 1983Aug 15, 1984Unicoils (Air Conditioning) LimitedA room heating and/or cooling device
EP2508809A1 *Apr 4, 2011Oct 10, 2012Halton OYTerminal unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/264, 137/890, 137/892
International ClassificationF24F1/01
Cooperative ClassificationF24F1/01, F24F2221/14
European ClassificationF24F1/01