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Publication numberUS3612026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1971
Filing dateMar 18, 1970
Priority dateMar 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3612026 A, US 3612026A, US-A-3612026, US3612026 A, US3612026A
InventorsLiepins Sigurds, Vadas John F
Original AssigneeCrosman Arms Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-operated revolver with rotatable magazine
US 3612026 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventors Appl. No.

Filed Patented Assignee 20,500 Mar. 1 8, 1970 John F. Vadas Oct. 12, 1971 Crosman Arms Company, Inc.

Fairport, N.Y. Division of Ser. No. 697

Pat. No. 3,547,095.

,049 Jan. I1, [968,

GAS-OPERATED REVOLVER WITH ROTATABLE Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Richard Dror Atlorney-B. Edward Shlesinger ABSTRACT: This revolver has a revolver barrel indexable about an axis perpendicular to the axis of the bore of the gun barrel, and having radially disposed, projectile-holding cham bers indexable successively into registry with said bore. When the trigger is squeezed, the hammer opens a valve, to deliver gas under pressure behind the projectile, which, at the time, is in registry with said bore, to propel said projectile from the gun. Opening of the valve also supplies gas to a piston to retract a reciprocable indexing mechanism on the frame. This mechanism recocks the hammer and permits the valve to close. A spring returns the mechanism to battery. On this return movement, a pawl carried by the mechanism indexes the revolver barrel.

e2 72 0 so 56 20 MAGAZINE 11 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs. US. Cl 124/11, 124/31, 124/48 Int. Cl F4lb 11/00 Field of Search l24/l l, l3, 13 A, 30,31,49,48

o la 1 e 9 44 L M 9s 3 9s 40 II 98 86 3 l I0 I o20l38 65 22 I12 I 29 '5 "4 H I I/ lg 132 1 :20 l 9 1 I50 I 134 I27 I22 fi/ PATENTEB 0m 1 2 I97! 3.617026 SHEEI 1 BF 4 INVENTOR JOHN F. VADAS SIGURDS LIEPINS WORNEY PATENTED UBHZIBYI SHEET 2 [IF 4 INVENTOR JOHN F. VADAS SIGURDS LIEPINS A RNEY GAS-OPERATED REVOLVER WITH ROTATABLE MAGAZINE This is a division of application Ser. No. 679,049, filed Jan. ll, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,547,095 patented Dec. 15, 1970.

This invention relates to revolvers, and more particularly to gas-operated revolvers of the semiautomatic type.

Gas-powered revolvers are well known, but in such revolvers the revolver barrel rotates about an axis extending in the direction of the bore of the gun barrel, and difficulty is always experienced in loading the gun with projectiles. Moreover, with prior types of gasoperated revolvers the hammer had to be recocked manually after each firing of the gun.

One object of the present invention is to provide a gasoperated revolver which can more easily be loaded with pellets.

A further object of the invention is to provide a gasoperated revolver in which the hammer is recocked automatically, and simultaneously another pellet is brought into firing position.

Still another object of this invention is to provide for a revolver of the type described, an improved sear mechanism, which is substantially more compact and reliable than prior such mechanisms.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims, particularly when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a revolver made in accordance with one embodiment of this invention, part thereof being cut away and shown in section;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary plan view of this revolver, with portions of its slide cut away;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of the same scale as FlG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view on a scale slightly smaller than that of FIG. 2, and taken along the line 4-4 in FlG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified form of this revolver, parts thereof being cut away and shown in section on the same scale as FlG. 3; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of the modified revolver, parts thereof again being cut away and shown in section.

Referring now to the drawings by numerals of reference, and first to the embodiment illustrated in FlGS. l to 4, l0 denotes a revolver comprising a frame 12 having a hollow hand grip portion 14, a trigger guard 16, and a trigger l7. Secured in a recess 20 (FlG. 3) in the frame 12 is a stationary block 22. Secured at its rear end in a groove in the upper face of the block 22, and projecting at its forward end beyond the body 12, is the gun barrel 26. Mounted for reciprocable movement on the frame above block 22 and barrel 26 is an elongate, inverted U-shaped slide 18, having opposed tongues or projections 24 (FIGS. 2 and 4), which slide in registering grooves 25 (FIG. 4) that extend longitudinally of the block 22.

Secured by a pin 23 in the block 22 rearwardly of the barrel 26, and in registry with the bore of the barrel, is a post 28 (FIGS. 2 and 3) which extends transversely of the bore of the barrel 26. Seated around the upper end of the post 28 in a recess 30 formed in the upper face of the block 22 is a retainer 31 having an arcuate marginal wall 33. The post 28 extends through a central opening 32 in the bottom of the retainer 31, and is formed with an external, circumferential flange 34, which seats in a cooperating recess in the retainer to secure the retainer against movement on block 22.

Mounted on post 28 to rotate coaxially thereabout within the retainer is a transfer member or revolver barrel 36 (FIGS. 2 to 4). Member 36 is provided with six, equiangularly spaced radial pockets or pellet chambers 38, each of which opens at its outer end on the periphery of the barrel 36, and at its inner end on post 28.

Member 36 seats on flange 34 of post 28, and is held against axial movement on the post by a C-ring or clamp 40 (FIGS. 2

and 3), which is releasably secured in a groove near the upper end of the post 28. The rear end of the gun barrel 26 extends through the opening 42 (FIG. 2) in the arcuate wall of the retainer 31 to register with the outer ends of the several pellet chambers 38 as the latter are indexed step by step into registry with the rear end of the gun barrel.

Projecting upwardly from member 36 are a plurality of equiangularly spaced ratchet teeth 44, each of which registers angularly with one of the pockets 38. Secured to slide 18 beneath the rear sight 45 of the revolver and above the rear end of the valve block 22 is a pawl support 46. Fastened by screws 47, or the like, to the underside of the support 46, and projecting forwardly therefrom is a flexible plate 48. Secured at its rear end between the support 46 and the plate 48 is a leaf spring 49, the forward end of which overlies and engages the forward end of plate 48 to urge the latter resiliently downwardly. Riveted or otherwise attached at their rear ends to the forward end of plate 48, and projecting at their forward ends over the top of the revolver barrel or turret 36 are two, spaced, parallel metal bars or straps 52 and 53 (FIG. 2), which function as indexing and locking pawls, respectively. The'indexing pawl 52, which is longer than the locking pawl 53, is engageable at its forward end with one of the ratchet teeth 44 to index the member 36 about the post 28 (clockwise in FIG. 2), when the slide 18 is moved forwardly, that is, retum'ed to battery position. Pawl 53 then engages another tooth 44 to prevent further clockwise rotation of member 36 while the slide 18 is in battery position. A pawl 54 fastened at one end by a screw 56 to one side of block 22 forwardly of member 36 extends rearwardly to overlie member 36 and engage one of the teeth 44 to prevent counterclockwise rotation of member 36 after it has been indexed.

In its forward end the block 22 has a chamber 60 (P10. 3), which is disposed beneath and parallel to the gun barrel 26. A duct 62 extends through the rear end of this chamber and diametrally through the post 28 into the bore 64 formed in block 22 rearwardly of the post. The forward end of chamber 60 is closed by a plug 66, which has an axial bore 67 that is connected to one end of a tube or conduit 68 that is adapted to supply gas under pressure to the chamber 60. Mounted in the chamber 60 normally to close the rear thereof is a valve 70, which has a resilient, rubber, or the like ring 72 seated in a recess in its rear end for engagement with an annular boss 74 that surrounds duct 62 in the rear end of chamber 60. An elongate valve stem 76 is secured at its front end in valve 70 and projects at its rear end slidably through the rear end of bore 64.

Valve 70 has an external circumferential flange or shoulder 78 that cooperates with stem 76 to guide the valve for axial reciprocation in chamber 60. At intervals thereabout shoulder 78 is flatted off as at 79 to allow passage of gas through the chamber 60 around the valve in conventional manner. A spring 80, which is interposed between the plug 66 and the valve 70, tends constantly to urge the valve to its closed position.

Intermediate its ends the stem 76 has a reduced diameter portion 82, which extends from the valve 70 rearwardly through the duct 62 into bore 64. Post 28 has an angular duct 84 in it, which communicates at one end with duct 62, and at its opposite end with that pocket 38 of revolver barrel 36 which at any one time is indexed into registry with gun barrel 26.

Formed in the rear of the block 22 above and parallel to the bore 64 is a chamber 88. Reciprocable in this chamber is a piston 90 having attached thereto a reduced diameter piston rod 92, which extends rearwardly and slides through the bore of an annular plug 94, which is secured in and closes the rear end of bore 88. A spring surrounds the rod 92 between piston 90 and plug 94 to urge the piston forwardly in bore 88.

When the valve 70 is open, gas from the chamber 60 passes into the duct 62 around the reduced diameter portion 82 of the valve stem, and through angular duct 84 into the rear of the pocket 38 then in registry with the rear end of the gun barrel 26. Part of the gas admitted to the duct 62 also passes into the forward end of the bore 64, and through inclined duct 86 in block 22 into chamber 88.

Rod 92 is formed at its rear with an enlarged transverse head 96. A pin 98, which extends through head 96, is fixed at opposite ends thereof in opposite sides, of slide 18, so that the latter is made to reciprocate with piston 90.

A hammer 100 (FIG. 3) is mounted at its lower end on a pin 102 in handle or hand grip 14 to pivot in a vertical slot 104 formed in the rear end of slide 18. Pin 102, which is secured in frame 12, extends transversely across recess beneath the rear end of the valve stem 76. Intermediate its end the hammer 100 carries a pin 106, which is connected by a spring 107 to a further pin 108, which projects from one side of block 22 adjacent the rear end thereof.

The lower end of hammer 100 is generally rounded, but has a notch 110 in it, which is engageable with the upper end of a sear 112 that is pivoted intermediate its ends on a pin 114 beneath and parallel to the pin 102. A torsion spring 116 surrounds the pin 114, and is engaged at one end in a notch 117 in the sear 112, and at its opposite end with a projection 118 on the frame 12, thereby constantly to urge the sear 112 about pin 114 (counterclockwise in FIG. 3) for engagement with notch 110, when the hammer is in its cocked position as illus trated in FIG. 3. At its lower end sear 112 has a lateral projection or ledge 120, which is engaged with a surface 121 of a sear release link 122, when the hammer is cocked. Link 122 is pivotally connected at its lower end by a pin 123 to one end of a further link 124. At its opposite end link 124 is pivoted on a stationary pin 125, which is fixed to frame 12. A torsion spring 126 surrounds the pin 125, and is engaged at one end with a projection 127 on the frame 12, and at its opposite end with the pin 123, constantly to urge the pin 123 and link 124 upwardly (counterclockwise in FIG. 3) about the pin 125. The upper end of link 122 is pivotally connected by a pin 129 to the rear end of a link 130, the opposite end of which is pivotally connected by a pin 131 to the rear end of trigger 17. A leaf spring 134, which is secured by a screw 135 to the frame 12 engages the rear end of the trigger 17 to urge the latter, and hence the link 130, toward the right in FIG. 3.

When the hammer is in its cocked position, as illustrated in FIG. 3, a projection 136 on the link 122 is positioned beneath and in registry with a pin 138, which projects laterally from the lower end of the hammer above the notch 110. Also at this time a notch 139, which is formed in the link 122, is positioned just out of registry with the lateral projection 120 on the sear 112.

Intermediate its ends the slide 18 has therein an opening 142 (FIGS. 1 to 3), which normally is positioned forwardly of the member 36. When the slide 18 moves rearwardly, its opening 142 exposes the forward end of an arcuate strap 144, which is slidably mounted in a circumferential recess formed in the outer face of the retainer 31 coaxially of the post 28. The forward end of the strap 144 is bent as at 145 (FIG. 2) to form thereon a handle portion, part of which normally projects into and transversely across a loading port 146 (FIG. 1), which is formed in the annular wall of the retainer 31 to register with the projectile chamber 38, which is adjacent, in a clockwise direction as illustrated in FIG. 2, the chamber 38 that is in registry with the rear end of the barrel 26.

To load the weapon, the slide 18 is moved manually rearwardly until the handle 145 is exposed through the opening 142. The strap 144 is then rotated by handle 145 until a pellet may be inserted into the registering chamber 38. The strap 144 slides into arcuate recess 148 (FIG. 2) in block 22. Then the slide 18 is returned forwardly by spring 95 acting on piston 90. During return movement the slide engages and swings handle 145 forwardly to the position illustrated in FIG. 2, and the pawl 52 indexes the revolver barrel. The slide 18 is again moved manually rearwardly, and the loading process is repeated until the remaining chambers 38 are loaded.

During its rearward movement, slide 18 causes member 96 to engage and pivot the hammer 100 into its cocked position (FIG. 3) against the resistance of the spring 107, if the hammer is not already in cocked position; and sear 112 will engage in notch 110 to hold the hammer cocked until subsequent operation of the trigger 132. The rearward movement of slide 18 also draws the two pawls 52 and 53 rearwardly far enough to cause the forward end of the indexing pawl 52 to be drawn over and then down behind one of the teeth 44 on top of member 36. During this movement, the pawl 54 remains engaged with another of the teeth 44 on member 36 to prevent undesirable counterclockwise rotation (FIG. 2) thereof during the retraction of pawl 52.

As the slide 18 returns forwardly to its normal position, it releases the tension in the spring 95. During this movement, the tooth 44 engaged by the indexing pawl 52 is pushed clockwise in FIG. 2 about the axis of post 28, a distance sufficient to cause member 36 to be rotated one-sixth (l/6) of a revolution, thereby swinging one chamber 38 out of loading position while advancing the next chamber 38 into loading position. As a chamber 38 rotates into loading position, the pawl 54 is pivoted downwardly in FIG. 2 far enough to permit the tooth to pass pawl 54 during indexing of member 36. At the completion of an indexing movement, the pawl 54 falls behind the tooth 44 associated with the chamber 38 then at the loading port, thereby to prevent rearward movement of member 36 the next time the slide 18 is moved rearwardly.

In use, a cartridge C containing gas under pressure (for example CO gas) is put into a chamber 150 (FIG. 3) in the handle or grip 14 with the discharge end of the cartridge seated in a conventional piercing device 152. This device is disposed in the upper end of chamber 150, and is connected to duct 68 to supply the propelling gas to chamber 60.

Assuming that the various parts are disposed in the positions illustrated in the drawings, and that each of the projectile chambers 38 is loaded with a pellet, the gun may be fired in the usual manner by squeezing trigger 17. This causes link 130 to force the upper end of link 122 rearwardly or toward the left in FIG. 3, so that its surface 121 bears against projection 120 on sear 112 with sufi'icient force to cause the sear to be pivoted (clockwise in FIG. 3) out of engagement with the notch 110 in the hammer 100 against the resistance of spring 116. The hammer 100 is now free to be pivoted by spring 107 about pin 102 (clockwise in FIG. 3) to cause the hammer to strike the rear end of valve stem 76 with sufficient force momentarily to unseat valve 70, thereby permitting gas under pressure to pass from chamber 60 into duct 62. It should be noted that the impact of the hammer 100 on the valve stem 76 is sufficient only to open the valve 70 momentarily; and then the spring recloses the valve.

Part of the gas that is admitted to the duct 62 passes upwardly through the duct 84 in post 28 to the rear of the pellet disposed in that chamber 38 then in registry with the gun barrel 26. This propels this pellet from the gun barrel. The other portion of the gas admitted to duct 62 passes through the duct 86 to urge the piston rearwardly in bore 88 against the resistance of spring 95. This movement shifts members 96 and 98 rearwardly; and slide 18, which is attached thereto, is moved on block 22 a distance sufficient to cause pawl 52 to disengage the tooth 44, with which it has previously been engaged, and positions this pawl for engagement with the next tooth 44 on the next forward stroke of slide 18. At the same time, the member 96 strikes and pivots the hammer 100 back to cocked position.

As the hammer returns to cocked position, the gas between piston 90 and the forward end of the bore 88 exhausts backwardly through the ducts 86, 62 and 84, and out of the barrel 26, thereby permitting spring to return piston 90 to the position illustrated in the drawings. This returns slide 18 forwardly to its normal position; and in this movement, pawl 52 indexes revolver 36 bringing a new chamber 38 and its pellet into registry with the rear end of gun barrel 26.

When the hammer disengages valve stem 76, valve 70 recloses under pressure of spring 80.

Assuming that the trigger 17 has been released, the pistol, therefore, is once again ready for firing.

During firing, and the pivotal movement of the hammer 100 toward valve stem 76, pin 138 on the hammer engages projection 136 on link 122 and urges the latter clockwise in FIG. 3 against the resistance of spring 126 until notch 139 registers with projection 120 on the sear. Projection 120 then enters notch 139, and the sear 112 pivots (counterclockwise in FIG. 3) under force of spring 116 to engage the hammer 100, so upon subsequent movement of the hammer by head 96 back to cocked position, sear 112 again engages in notch 110 to hold the hammer cocked.

As long as the trigger 17 is being squeezed, however, projection 120 will be engaged in the notch 139 of lever 122, and the sear 112 will be free to engage the notch 110. As a consequence, once the weapon is fired, it is possible to recock the hammer, but the gun cannot again be fired until the trigger is released, at which time the leaf spring 134 will urge the trigger and link 130 forwardly, thereby pivoting the upper end of link 122 forwardly or toward the right in FIG. 3 so that its notch 139 is withdrawn from engagement with the projection 120 on the sear. This pennits the spring 126 to urge the link 122 upwardly alongside of the projection 120 on the sear so that the surface 121 once again engages the sear projection 120, and the weapon is again ready to be fired.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6, wherein like numerals are employed to designate elements similar to those used in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 to 4, 210 denotes a modified pistol comprising a frame 212 containing the block 22 and barrel 26 as in the first embodiment. However, unlike the revolver 10, the upper portion 218 of revolver 210 is integral with frame 212, and does not reciprocate thereon as in the case of slide 18 in the first embodiment. Instead, a slotted plate, or indexing member 220 is mounted to reciprocate lon' gitudinally of the revolver in the space between block 22 and the upper frame portion 218.

At its forward end plate 220 is connected by a spring 222 to the forward end of barrel 26. At its rear end plate 220 has a pair of cars 224 which are pivotally connected by a pin 226 to the upper ends of a pair of links 228, the lower ends of which 5 jectile into registry with barrel 26. Pawl 253 then acts,

are pivoted on the hammer pivot pin 102 at opposite sides of hammer 100. Adjacent its forward end plate 220 has therein a longitudinally extending slot 230, opposite sides of which have sliding engagement with diametrally opposite sides of post 28 above the rotatable transfer member or revolver barrel 36.

Secured to the underside of plate 220 rearwardly of slot 230 are two, spaced, parallel pawls 252 and 253, the forward ends of which project downwardly from the plate for engagement with different teeth 44 on the upper end of member 36.

Integral with plate 220 adjacent its rear end, and projecting downwardly therefrom over opposite sides of block 22 adjacent its rear end, are two parallel skirts or flanges 232, each of which carries a pin 234 that slides in an arcuate groove or notch 236 formed in the confronting face of block 22.

Secured to and extending transversely between the arms or links 228 is a bar or crosspiece 240, which registers with the rear end of the piston rod 92.

Revolver 210 is otherwise similar to revolver 10; and when revolver 210 is fired, the blast which propels the projectile from barrel 26 also causes rod 92 to be urged momentarily rearwardly from the position shown in FIG. 5, and in a manner similar to that described above with respect to the first embodiment. As rod 92 moves rearwardly it strikes bar 240 causing links 228 to be pivoted rearwardly (e.g. counterclockwise in FIG. 5) about pin 102. This swings bar 240 against the hammer I00 to move the latter to its cocked position, and also swings pin 226 slightly rearwardly about the axis of pin 102, thereby causing plate 220 to be drawn rearwardly and slightly downwardly. During this rearward movement of plate 220, the pawl 252 is disengaged from the pin or tooth 44 with which it has been engaged (FIG. 6) and moved rearwardly to drop behind the next adjacent tooth considered in the counterclockwise direction. During this movement the skirts 232 and pins 234 carried thereby are guided by the slots 236 to prevent plate 220 from becoming disengaged from post 28.

similarly to pawl 53, to prevent further indexing of barrel 36 until plate 220 is again retracted.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the revolvers described are easy to load, and fast to fire. Moreover, they are semiautomatic in operation, the operating gas being used both to propel projectiles from the guns, and to effect recocking of the guns, each time they are fired.

While the invention has been described in connection with a specific embodiment thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations of the invention following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth, and as fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim is:

1. A gas-operated gun, comprising a body having therein a chamber for holding a supply of gas under pressure,

a barrel mounted on said body,

a hammer movable in said body between a cocked and a fired position, respectively,

a trigger for releasably holding said hammer in its cocked position,

an indexable member rotatably mounted on said body for rotation about an axis transverse to the axis of said barrel, and having therein a plurality of spaced recesses, each of which is adapted to hold a projectile,

means for rotatable indexing said member about its axis to advance said recesses successively into registry with said barrel, means for connecting said chamber with the recess that registers with said barrel, including a normally closed valve positioned to be opened by said hammer upon movement thereof to said fired position, and operable, when opened, to release gas from said chamber to propel from said barrel the projectile disposed in the registering recess, and,

movable means on said body operable by the gas released from said chamber to move said hammer to its cocked position, and momentarily to actuate said indexing means to advance another of said recesses into registry with said barrel.

2. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 1, wherein said connecting means comprises a post fixed to said body rearwardly of and transverse to said barrel, and having therein a first duct which opens at one end on the periphery of said post, and at its opposite end communicates with said chamber, when said valve is open,

said indexable member is annular and is mounted to rotate on said post coaxially thereof, and

said recesses extend radially through said member at equiangularly spaced points thereabout, whereby the recess that registers with said barrel opens at one end on the bore of said barrel, and at its opposite end on said one end of said duct.

3. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 2, wherein said movable means comprises an actuator mounted on said body to reciprocate transverse to the axis of rotation of said indexible member each time a projectile is propelled from the barrel, and

said indexing means comprises a pawl carriedby said actuator, and

a ratchet wheel secured to said indexable member and operable by said pawl to rotate said member a fraction of a revolution each time said actuator reciprocates.

4. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3, wherein a cocking member is connected to said actuator for movement against said hammer, during the movement of said actuator in one direction, thereby to shift said hammer to its cocked posi tion.

5. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3, wherein a second chamber is formed in said body adjacent the firstnamed chamber to communicate with said first-named chamber, when said valve is opened,

a spring is positioned in said second chamber,

a reciprocable piston is disposed in said second chamber for movement against the resistance of said spring, when gas is released to said second chamber from said firstnamed chamber, and

said actuator is operatively connected to said piston for movement thereby.

6. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3, wherein said actuator is a slide which reciprocates parallel to said barrel and carries a cocking member which engages said hammer upon the movement of the actuator rearwardly on said body to move said hammer to its cocked position, and

means positively connects said slide to said piston for reciprocation thereby.

7. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 3, wherein a link is mounted at one end on said body to pivot about an axis transverse to said post, and is pivotally connected at its opposite end to one end of said actuator,

a second spring is connected to the opposite end of said actuator to resist the movement of said actuator and link about the last-named axis, and

said piston is operatively connected to said link to urge the latter in one direction about said last-named axis, and against the resistance of said second spring, when said piston is moved against the resistance of the first-named spring.

8. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 7, having a cocking member secured to said link for movement thereby against said hammer to move the latter to a cocked position, when said link is pivoted in said one direction.

9. A gas-powered gun as defined in claim 2, wherein a retaining member is secured in said frame and has an annular wall portion surrounding said indexable member coaxially thereof,

said annular wall portion has therethrough a first port, which registers with the rear end of said barrel, and a second port angularly spaced from said first port to register with, and to permit the loading of, the projectile recesses in the indexable member during the rotation of the latter about said post.

10. A gas-operated gun as defined in claim 9, including an arcuate cover strap mounted in a recess in the outer face of said annular wall portion for sliding movement coaxially of said retaining member between a first position in which one end of said strap covers said second port, and a second position in which said second port is uncovered.

l l. A gas-operated gun comprising a body having therein a chamber for holding a supply of gas under pressure,

a barrel mounted on said body,

a hammer pivoted on said body between a cocked and a fired position, respectively,

a trigger for releasably holding said hammer in its cocked position,

an indexable member movably mounted on said body, and

having therein a plurality of spaced recesses, each of which is adapted to hold a projectile,

means for indexing said member to advance said recesses successively into registry with said barrel,

means for connecting said chamber with the recess that registers with said barrel, including a normally closed valve positioned to be opened by said hammer upon movement thereof to said fired position, and operable, when opened, to release gas from said chamber to propel from said bar rel the projectile disposed in the registering recess, and

movable means on said body operable by the gas released from said chamber to move said hammer to its cocked position, and momentarily to actuate said indexing means to advance another of said recesses into registry with said barrel,

a sear pivoted on said body adjacent said hammer and has a first projection engageable in a notch in said hammer to hold the latter in its cocked position,

a sear trip movable by said trigger and having thereon an operating surface which is engageable with a second projection on said sear to pivot the latter in a direction to disengage said first projection from said notch, thereby to release said hammer, and

means interposed between said hammer and trip and operative upon release of said hammer to move said trip independently of said trigger in a direction to disengage said operating surface from said second projection, thereby to allow said first projection to reengage said notch, when said hammer is returned to its cocked position, and to prevent reengagement of said operating surface with said second projection until said trigger is released.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification124/76, 124/74, 124/31, 124/48
International ClassificationF41B11/02, F41B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B11/54
European ClassificationF41B11/54