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Publication numberUS3612190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1971
Filing dateApr 24, 1970
Priority dateApr 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3612190 A, US 3612190A, US-A-3612190, US3612190 A, US3612190A
InventorsWills Mac Gordon
Original AssigneeWills Mac Gordon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rock drill supporting vehicles for cut-and-fill stopping operations
US 3612190 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] inventor Mac Qordon Wills R.R.#2, Chelmsford, Ontario, Canada [21] Appl. No. 31,587 [22] Filed Apr. 24, 1970 [45] Patented Oct. 12, 1971 [54] ROCK DRILL SUPPORTING VEHICLES FOR CUT- AND-FILL STOPPING OPERATIONS 10 Claims, 9 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 173/20, 173/23,173/43,l73/45,173/52, 308/39 [51] Int. Cl E2lc 11/02 [50] Field of Search 173/20, 21, 23, 45

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,655,006 10/1953 I-loen et al. 173/20X 3,181,624 5/1965 Lindberg 3,529,680 9/1970 Nardone m1.

Primary Examiner-Ernest R. Purser Attorney-Cecil C. Kent ABSTRACT: A rock drill supporting vehicle particularly intended for use in cut-and-fill stopping operations has one or more fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting cab1e cylinders adjustably mounted on a chassis structure of the vehicle. Three spaced-apart hydraulic jacks are provided for levelling the vehicle on the mine floor and a bubble level is provided on the vehicle for indicating when the vehicle has been moved into a level disposition. With this structure, a constant but adjustable predetermined drill hole angle is obtained. A fixed lug permanently secured to one of the wheels of the vehicle func tions as an odometer and permits accurate control of drill hole separation.

PATENTEDUEHZISYI 3.612.190

SHEET 1 0F 4 INVIiN'I'OR. MAC GORDON WILLS W 6. 2 446 Attorney sum 3 0r 4 PATENIED 0m 1 219m m2 v2 a! ll m2 w mm P: NQ m2 \7 .1 n g 8 mm 3: 2: 2 E m 0 3 EI! 145 2 3 J| A? L mm as me a 8 A v 2: I 2 8 R 2: 2: Q: 5 m m 2 vw 2N I-NV/LN'l UR. MAC GORDON WILLS BY: M 61%;; Attorney ROCK DRILL SUPPORTING VEHICLES FOR CUT-AND- FILL STOPPING OPERATIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to wheeled vehicles adapted to support one or more rock drills thereon, which vehicles are particularly suited for use in cut-and-fill stoping operations.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a simple vehicle on which one or more fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting structures are adjustably mounted whereby a single operator can control one or more rock drills with reduced fatigue and with greater safety.

Another important object of this invention is to provide a vehicle of the aforementioned type in which vehicle exceedingly effective but simple means are provided for ensuring that the separation between adjacent sets of drill holes is maintained at a constant predetermined value and that all such drill holes are formed at a constant desired angle.

Another object of this invention is to provide means on a vehicle of the aforementioned type whereby such constant drill hole angle can be obtained while providing ready adjustability for both such drill hole separation and such drill hole angle.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description herein proceeds.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In its broadest scope, the present invention provides a wheeled vehicle adapted to support one or more rock drills thereon, which vehicle includes a chassis structure, a groundengaging wheel mounted on said chassis structure for movement of said vehicle along a mine floor, at least one fluidoperated drill guiding and supporting structure angularly adjustably mounted on said chassis structure and adapted to have a rock drill detachably mounted thereon for longitudinal reciprocation relative to said chassis structure, a plurality of fluid-operated stabilizing jacks mounted on said chassis structure and each including a ground-engaging member, first fluid control and transfer means for the selective control of flow of operating fluid to each of said stabilizing jacks for moving said chassis structure into and out of a predetermined disposition in both longitudinal and transverse directions relative to the horizontal, indicating means for indicating the angular disposition of said chassis structure in both said longitudinal and transverse directions relative to the horizontal, second fluid flow control and transfer means for the control of the flow of operating fluid to each fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting structure for causing longitudinal movement of said drill guiding and supporting structure relative to said chassis structure, and odometrical means associated with said groundengaging wheel for conjoint movement therewith for indicating the extent of movement of said chassis structure along the mine floor.

With the foregoing in view, and such other or further purposes, advantages or novel features as may become apparent from consideration of this disclosure and specification, the present invention consists of the inventive concept which is comprised, embodied, embraced, or included in the method, process, construction, composition, arrangement, or combination of parts, or new use of any of the foregoing, herein exemplified in one or more specific embodiments of such concept, reference being had to the accompanying figures in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of one embodiment of a rock drill supporting vehicle in accordance with the present invention, a pneumatically operated rock drill being shown as being mounted on one of the drill guiding and supporting structures of that vehicle.

FIG. 2 is a front end elevation of the rock drill supporting vehicle shown in FIG. I with the rock drill and certain components of the vehicle omitted for the sake of clarity, and the drill guiding and supporting structures provided on the vehicle being shown partly in section.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation of one of the drill guiding and supporting structures of the vehicle shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, also showing details of a hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism and of an adjustable mounting means provided on the vehicle of FIGS. I and 2.

FIG. 4 is a transverse vertical section through the hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism and the mounting means shown in FIG. 3 when viewed as indicated by the arrows 44 of that FIG. the pneumatically operated rock drill and the supporting structure shown in FIG. 3 having been omitted for the sake of clarity.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal section through the drill guiding and supporting structure shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 also showing details of the hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism provided on the vehicle of FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged transverse section through the cable cylinder of the drill guiding and supporting structure of FIGS. 3 and 5 when taken as indicated by the arrows 6-6 of FIG. 3 but with the drill-supporting carriage of the drill guiding and supporting structure moved forwardly so as to be shown in section.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view with certain internal components shown in phantom outline of one of the hydraulic jacks provided in accordance with this invention on the vehicle shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged front perspective view of an alternative construction for a drill steel centering device for use on a drill-supporting vehicle in accordance with this invention, showing such centering device in its closed or drill steel engaging position and with certain component parts of the device being shown in phantom outline.

FIG. 9 is a rear perspective view of the drill steel centering device of FIG. 8 showing the device in its open or drill steel releasing position.

In the drawings, like characters of reference designate similar parts in the several figures.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS '13 and 14 interconnected by a lower transverse tubular member 15 and by an upper transverse tubular member 16. The longitudinal structural member 11 is detachably and adjustably secured to the lower transverse tubular member 15 by a mounting means generally indicated at 17 while the upper and lower transverse tubular member 16 and 15 respectively are secured to the upright members 13 and 14, for example,

by welding.

The mounting means I? includes an upper saddle clamp 18,

an intermediate saddle clamp 19 and a lower saddle clamp 20,

bolts 21, and nuts 22 serving firmly to hold the saddle clamps on the structural members 11 and 15. It will be appreciated that both the longitudinal and transverse positions of the low gitudinally extending member 11 relative to the transverse member 15 can readily be adjusted as desired and that the chassis structure of the vehicle is easily dismantled to facilitate moving the vehicle 10 to a different location.

At their lower ends, the upright tubular members 13 and 14 are integrally formed with transversely outwardly extending sections 23 an 24 respectively in which axles 25 and 26 respectively are suitably journaled. Ground-engaging wheels 27 and 28 are keyed on the axles 25 and 26 respectively and each of the axles 25 and 26 has a driven sprocket 29 keyed thereon. A pneumatically operated motor 30 is mounted on a bracket 31 suitably secured, for example, by welding, to the lower end of a respective one of the upright members 13 and 14.

Each of the motors 30 is operatively coupled to a speedreducing gearbox 32 having an output drive sprocket 33. A chain 34 is entrained around each pair of sprockets 29 and 33. Each motor 30 is provided with air hoses 35 and 36 for the supply of compressed air thereto when operation of the motor in either direction is required for driving a respective one of the wheels 27 and 28. The control valve system by which compressed air is supplied as required to the hoses 35 and 36 will be described hereinafter in greater detail.

The vehicle has a steerable rear wheel 37 rotatably mounted between the yoke arms 38 by shackles 39 holding a wheel axle 40. A web (not shown) interconnecting the upper ends of the yoke arms 38 is provided with an upstanding pivot pin extending through a sleeve 41 secured to a bracket 42 in turn secured to the rearward end of the longitudinally extending tubular structural member 11. A U-shaped handle 43 is pivotally mounted on the yoke arms 38 to enable the vehicle 10 to be towed along the ground. The rear wheel 37 and its mounting assembly are omitted from FIG. 2 for the sake of clarity. In the particular vehicle 10 shown in the accompanying drawings, there are also provided mudguards 44 mounted over the front wheels 27 and 28, which mudguards 44 also function as brakes. Each such mudguard/brake 44 comprises a generally curved member 45 having transversely disposed, wheel-engaging ribs 46 provided on its undersurface. These members 45 are reinforced by plates 47 and 48 which are secured in turn, for example, by welding, to respective ones of sleeves 49 in which the outer ends of respective crank arms 50 are pivotally received, the sleeves 49 being retained in position by split pins 51. Lubricating nipples 52 are usefully provided in the sleeves 49. Each crank arm 50 is suitably pivotally and slidably supported in a transversely disposed sleeve 53 mounted on a respective short transverse member 54 in turn secured, for example, by welding, to a respective one of the upright frame members 13 and 14. The sleeves 53 may similarly be provided with lubricating nipples 55. At their inner ends, the crank arms 50 are adjustably secured in a transverse tubular member 56 by setscrews 57, locknuts 58 being provided to maintain the crank arms 50 locked to the transverse tubular member 56 for corotation therewith.

A front brake rod 59 has a transversely extending tongue 60 passing through a hole provided in a downwardly projecting lug 61 secured, for example, by welding, to the aforementioned transverse tubular member 56. At its rearward end, the front brake rod 59 is connected to a length-adjusting means such as a turnbuckle 62 from which a rear brake rod 63 extends to a brake-actuating handle 64. The handle 64 having a handgrip 65 is suitably pivoted at 66 to a bracket 67 secured to the longitudinal extending tubular structural member 11 and, above the pivot 66, the handle 64 is pivotally connected to the rear brake rod 63. A simple guide and detent mechanism in the form of a plate 68 secured, for example, by welding, to the longitudinal member 11 has a longitudinally extending slot (not shown) therein in which the handle 64 can be moved. Such slot is widened at its rearward end to provide a detent (not shown) for holding the brake handle 64 in its rearwardly pivoted braking position so that the ribs 46 of the mudguard brakes 44 are held in frictional engagement with tires 69 on the front wheels 27 and 28 to prevent movement of the vehicle 10.

The vehicle 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 has two drill guiding and supporting structures generally indicated at 70 and 71 mounted thereon in an adjustable manner which will be considered in greater detail hereinafter. The drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71 are generally identical to each other and a detailed description of only one of the structures, namely structure 70, will now be given with particular reference to FIGS. 1 to 6 of the accompanying drawings. The same legends will be used for indicating corresponding components of the two structures 70 and 71.

The drill guiding and supporting structure 70 comprises a pneumatically operated cable cylinder generally indicated at 72, a hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism generally indicated at 73, an adjustable mounting means generally indicated at 74 and a drill steel centering device generally indicated at 75. In FIGS. 1 and 3, the drill guiding and supporting structure 70 is shown with a pneumatically operated rock drill generally indicated at 76 detachably supported thereon and with a drill steel 77 disposed in the rock drill 76 and extending forwardly therefrom through a respective one of the aforementioned drill steel centering devices 75.

Referring now in greater detail to the structure of the cable cylinder 72, it will be seen that this cable cylinder 72 is in the form of an elongated member 78 having a first or forward end 79 and a second or rearward end 80. A cylindrical bore 81 extends through the elongated member 78. First and second closure members generally indicated at 82 and 83 (FIG. 5) are provided at the forward and rearward ends 79 and respectively of the elongated member 78 and serve to close the respective ends of the cylindrical bore 81.

A carriage generally indicated at 84 is slidably mounted externally on the upper surface of the elongated member 78 for longitudinal reciprocation therealong in a manner which will be described in greater detail hereinafter. A piston generally indicated at 85 is disposed within the cylindrical bore 81 for longitudinal reciprocation therein and defines with the forward and rearward closure members 82 and 83 respectively first and second variable volume cylinder chambers 86 and 87 respectively. A first cable 88 is secured to and extends from the piston 85 through the first cylinder chamber 86 and round a first support means disposed adjacent the forward end 79 of the elongated member 78 and, in the embodiment illustrated this first support means is in the form of a pivotally mounted pulley 89. From the pulley 89, the first cable 88 extends longitudinally and externally of the elongated member 78 to the carriage 84 to which it is secured in a manner which will be described hereinafter in greater detail.

A second cable 90 similarly interconnects the carriage 84 and the piston 85 but the cable 90 extends through the second cylinder chamber 87 and round a support means comprising a pulley 91 pivotally mounted adjacent the second end 80 of the elongated member 78. The structure of the cable cylinder 72 is essentially completed by the provision of fluid ports 92 and 93 for the supply and discharge of compressed air to and from the first and second cylinder chambers 86 and 87 respectively.

Although the structure of the cable cylinder 72 has now been essentially described, further details of the specific construction therefor as illustrated in the accompanying drawings will now be given herein. Referring further, therefore, to the piston 85, with particular reference to FIG. 5, it will be seen that this piston 85 comprises a piston body 94 having suitable piston sleeves 95 of a resilient material such as leather disposed therearound for the purpose of providing a substantially fluidtight seal with the inner surface of the wall of the cylindrical bore 81. Axially extending piston plates 96 and 97 are secured to the piston body 94 and the first and second cables 88 and 90 respectively are secured to these piston plates 96 and 97 respectively by saddle clamps and screws as indicated at 98.

As will best be seen from FIGS. 4 and 5, the aforementioned carriage 84 comprises a baseplate 99 adapted guidingly to be supported on the top surface of the elongated member 78. Opposed outwardly and longitudinally extending guide flanges 100 are integrally formed with a downwardly and longitudinally extending central leg 101 which is in turn integrally formed with the baseplate 99. The guide flanges 100 are slidably received within opposed, longitudinally extending guideways 102 extending transversely outwardly from a longitudinally extending channel provided centrally in the top surface of the elongated member 78. It will be appreciated that, with this particular construction, the carriage 84 is restrained against transverse and vertical movement with respect to the elongated member 78 but is free to undergo longitudinal reciprocation therealong as will be described hereinafter in greater detail.

The forward or first cable 88 is secured to the carriage 84 by means of a forward plate 103 suitably secured in turn, for ex ample, by welding, to the forward end of the baseplate 99. Saddle clamps 104 and screws 105 serve to secure the cable 88 rigidly to the plate 103. The second cable 90 is similarly secured to a rear plate 106 by saddle clamps 107 and screws 108. The rear plate 106 is not, however, rigidly connected to the baseplate 99 but is, instead, slidingly supported on a fixed rear plate 109 rigidly connected, for example, by welding, to the baseplate 99. A cable-tensioning device generally indicated at 110 comprises a forwardly extending'bolt 111, the head of which is secured to the slidable rear plate 106. The shaft of the bolt 111 extends freely through an opening in an upstanding flange 112 secured to the rearward end of the baseplate 99. A helical compression spring 113 surrounds the shaft of the bolt 111 forwardly of the flange 112 and is held in place by a washer 114 and locknuts 115. The carriage 84 is suitably provided with an adapter 116 and a stop member 117 adapted to support and retain a rock drill such as rock drill 76 thereon.

Referring again to the pulleys 89 and 91, it will be seen that these pulleys are pivotally supported by transversely disposed shafts formed by bolts 118 retained in position by nuts (not shown). The bolts 118 pass through bifurcated, longitudinally extending arms 120 and 121 suitably secured to the forward and rearward ends 79 and 80 respectively of the elongated member 78. The rearward arms 121 are strengthened by simple end plates 122.

The first and second closure members 82 and 83 respectively are in the form of generally cylindrical plugs disposed partially within the respective ends of the cylindrical bore 81 and are retained in position, for example, by welding or by any suitable threaded or other engagement with the elongated member 78. Each of the plugs has a bore through which a respective one. of the first and second cables 88 and 90 slidably extends. Each such bore contains a suitable fluid seal retained in position by a gland nut 123 to prevent the escape of compressed air from the cylinder chambers 86 and 87. A further seal in the form of an O-ring 124 is usefully provided between each of the aforementioned plugs and the inner surface of the wall of the cylindrical bore 81.

The fluid ports 92 and 93 are provided with suitable nipples to which fluid-carrying hoses 125 and 126 can be secured in any appropriate manner for a purpose which will be more readily understood as the description herein proceeds, the hose 125 being secured along the side of the elongated member 78 by saddle clamps 129 (FIG. 1).

Referring again to the elongated member 78, it will be seen by particular reference to P16. 6 that this member 78 is provided with opposed, longitudinally extending keyways 127 and 128 in its sidewalls and that these keyways 127 and 128 are slidably received between corresponding tongues yet to be described of the aforementioned hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism 73.

Another useful but optional feature of this invention resides in the provision in the elongated member 78 of longitudinally extending bores 130 and 131 (FIG. 6) which are provided for the purpose of supplying air under pressure to the drill steel centering device 75 for operation of that device. Each of the bores 130 and 131 is in fluid communication with a respective forward nipple located near the forward end 79 of the elongated member 78 and with a respective rearward nipple located near the rearward end 80 of the elongated member 78. Hoses 132 and 133 are shown as being coupled to the rearward nipples for the flow of pressurized fluid into respective ones of the aforementioned bores 130 and 131 from a suitable source (yet to be described) or for the return of pressurized fluid therefrom. A hose 134 is shown as being coupled to the forward nipple of the bore 130 for the flow of pressurized fluid between that bore and the blind end of a fluid-operated cylinder 135 forming part of the aforementioned centering means 75. A second hose 136 is suitably provided between the rod end of the cylinder and a forward nipple of the bore 131. The provision of such additional bores in the elongated member 78 of the cable cylinder 72 is beneficial in that it reduces the length of unprotected hose required on a rockdrilling vehicle on which the drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71 are mounted and, therefore, considerably reduces the risk of damage to such hoses during operation of that vehicle.

Referring now in greater detail to the structure of the drill steel centering device 75, it will be seen that this device 75 includes a generally U-shaped drill steel supporting member generally indicated at 137 which is pivotally mounted at 138 between a pair of forwardly extending upright plates 139 for movement between the upright steel-engaging position shown in FIG. 1 and a steel-releasing position in which the member 137 is pivoted forwardly and downwardly from the position shown in FIG. 1 as indicated by the arrow A of that Figure.

A piston rod 140 extends forwardly from a piston head within the cylinder 135 and this rod 140 is pivotally connected at 142 to a downward and slightly forward extension 143 of the drill steel supporting member 137. The cylinder 135 is itself pivotally mounted at 144 between a pair of transversely spaced apart, downwardly extending plates 145 secured to the elongated member 78 at the forward end 79 of the drill guiding and supporting structure 70.

The construction of the aforementioned hydraulically operated advance-retract mechanism 73 will now be described. This advance-retract mechanism 73 is provided between the cable cylinder 72 and the adjustable mounting means 74 used to mount the drill guiding and supporting structure 70 on the hollow transverse structural member 16. The advance-retract mechanism 73 includes a double-acting hydraulic cylinder 148 from which a piston rod 149 extends forwardly to a clamping means generally indicated at 150 and to which it is pivotally attached at 151. The clamping means 150 includes a pair of opposed tongues 152 and 153 which are received in the aforementioned keyways 127 and 128 of the elongated member 78 and are clamped in position therein by a bolt 154 extending transversely through the clamping means 150.

At its rearward end, the cylinder 148 is pivotally mounted at 155 within a cylinder housing frame 156 which is formed with forward and rearward pairs of upstanding plates 157 which are provided with fixed tongues 158 which are slidingly received in the keyways 127 and 128 of the elongated member 78. Fluid hoses 159 and 160 are provided for the flow of hydraulic fluid to and from the blind end and the rod end respectively of the cylinder 148. On operation of the cylinder 148, the elongated member 78 is moved forwardly or rearwardly relative to the vehicle as represented by the structural member 16, the

elongated member 78 sliding between the pairs of tongues 158. Opposed, longitudinally extending keyways 161 and 162 are provided in the sidewalls of the cylinder housing frame 156 for securing the advance-retract mechanism 73 on the adjustable mounting means 74 in a manner yet to be described.

Referring now in greater detail to the adjustable mounting means 74, it will be seen from FlGS. 3 and 4 and this means 74 includes locking members or tongues 163 and 164 which are received respectively in the aforementioned keyways 161 and 162 of the cylinder housing frame 156. in particular, it is to be noted that the mounting means 74 comprises a body 165 having the tongue 164 integrally formed therewith on its upper surface. The opposed tongue 163 is integrally formed with a movable plate 166 which is carried by a bolt 167 extending therethrough and through the body 165. A nut 168 serves to tighten the tongues 163 and 164 in the keyways 161 and 162 respectively to prevent longitudinal movement of the cylinder housing frame 156 through the mounting means 74.

Diverging downwardly and outwardly from the aforementioned body 165 and integrally formed therewith, there is provided a generally circular, frustoconical member 169. The lower end of this member 169 is rotatably received between a generally arcuate, upwardly extending flange 170 (FIG. 3) integrally formed with an upper saddle clamp 171 and a generally arcuate flange 172 extending upwardly from a clamping plate 173 supported by a bolt 174 which in turn extends through the upper saddle clamp 171. A nut 175 is provided for holding the arcuate flanges 170 and 172 firmly against the frustoconical member 169 to prevent undesired rotation of the cylinder housing frame 156 thereabout.

Four bolts 176 extend downwardly from the upper saddle clamp 171 freely through a lower saddle clamp 177 and nuts 178 are provided for clamping the saddle clamps 171 and 177 securely about the transverse member 16 of the vehicle 10.

The vehicle also includes three hydraulic jacks 180, 181 and 182, the jacks 180 and 181 being suitably secured to the lower ends of the aforementioned upright tubular members 13 and 14 respectively and the jack 182 being secured to the longitudinally extending tubular structural frame member 11 in general proximity to the rearward end thereof. The jacks 180, 181, and 182 are essentially identical to each other and, for this reason, the structure of the jack 180 only will now be described with particular reference to FIG. 7 of the accomying drawings. The various components of the jacks 180, 181, and 182 are identified in the accompanying drawings by the same legends.

It will be seen from FIG. 7 that the jack 180 comprises a first or upper guide member 183 in the form of an elongated hollow member having a generally square cross-sectional configuration and an open lower end. A second or lower guide member 184 having an external configuration corresponding to the internal configuration of the upper guide member 183 is slidably received within that upper guide member 183 for axial reciprocating movement therein as indicated by the double-headed arrow B (FIG. 7). The purpose of the guide members 183 and 184 will become more apparent as the description herein proceeds.

At its lower end, the lower guide member 184 is rigidly secured for example, by welding to a ground-engaging plate generally indicated at 185. For this purpose, the plate 185 is provided with transversely spaced-apart, upstanding flanges 186 and 187 to which the lower guide member 184 is secured. Usefully, the plate 185 is formed with an irregular ground-engaging undersurface 188. In the particular embodiment illustrated in FIG. 7, such undersurface is shown as being provided with transversely extending ribs but the use of other patterns of ribs is equally possible.

The jack 180 also includes a hydraulically actuated doubleacting ram which in turn comprises a cylinder 190 and a piston 191 having a piston rod 192 extending downwardly therefrom. At its upper end, the cylinder 190 has secured thereto an upstanding lug 193 through which a pivot pin 194 freely extends. The pivot pin 194 is supported in plates 195 and 196 suitably secured, for example, by welding, to opposite faces of the upper guide member 183, split pins 197 serving to retain the pivot pin 194 in position.

At its lower end, the aforementioned piston rod 192 is pivotally connected to the aforementioned ground-engaging plate 185 by means of a pivot pin 198 extending through holes provided for this purpose in the aforementioned upstanding flanges 186 and 187, split pins 199 being provided to retain the pivot pin 198 in position. The pivot pin 198 is provided with an upstanding radial sleeve adapter 200 within which the lower end of the piston rod 192 is secured, for example, by welding. It will be seen from P10. 7 that the piston rod 192 is disposed essentially parallel to the common axis of the upper and lower guide members 183 and 184 respectively.

The upper and lower ends of the cylinder 190 are closed and a suitable seal (not shown) of any conventional type is provided for preventing excessive escape of hydraulic fluid from within the cylinder 190 through the lower end thereof around the piston rod 192.

Hose 201 and 202 serve selectively to supply hydraulic fluid under pressure to a desired end of the cylinder 192 and to discharge such fluid from the other end of that cylinder to cause extension and retraction as required of the piston rod 192.

During such operation of the cylinder 190, interengagement of the upper and lower guide members 183 and 184 respectively serve substantially to reduce the transverse and torsional stresses imposed on the piston rod 192. Consequently, much longer life for the ram structure comprising the cylinder 190, the piston 191 and the piston rod 192 is obtained. An opening 203 is provided for the free flow of air into and out of the upper guide member 183. The pairs of hoses 201 and 202 from each of the jacks 180, 181, and 182 extend to a valve block generally indicated at 226. A ladder 205 is secured at 206 on the upper transverse tubular member 16 of the vehicle 10 to permit an operator to climb on the vehicle 10 for such purposes as fitting rock drills such as rock drill 76 thereon and for making any necessary adjustments to the vehicle 10.

Although the pneumatically operated rock drill 76 forms no part of the present invention, it will be of value in understanding the operation and use of the vehicles of this invention to note that the drill 76 is provided with a hose 210 for the supply of compressed air thereto and with a second hose 211 for the supply of flushing water. The air supplied through the hose 210 serves to operate the drill 76 while the water supplied through the hose 211 is passed through the hollow drill steel 77 and serves to flush out dust and dirt from the drill hole being drilled as well as serving to cool the drill steel.

In particular vehicle 10 shown in the accompanying drawings, the aforementioned longitudinally extending tubalar structural member 11 is utilized as a reservoir for compressed air and, for this purpose, is supplied with air under pressure from a suitable compressor (not shown) through a hose 212, a lubricator 213 being mounted on the tubular member 11 for the purpose of introducing a suitable liquid lubricant into the air flowing into the member 11. Air under pressure flows from the tubular member 11 through a suitable manifold line generally indicated at 214 to air supply control valves 215, 216, 217, and 218 mounted on a frame generally indicated at 219 and in turn secured to the forward end of the longitudinal member 11.

The control valve 215 is operative to control the supply of compressed air to the hose 210 for controlling operation of the rock drill 76 while the control valve 216 is operative to control the flow of compressed air to the hoses and 126 leading to the first and second cylinder chamber 86 and 87 respectively of the cable cylinder 72. The control valve 217 is used to control the flow of compressed air to the hoses 132 and 133 for controlling operation of the drill steel centering device 75 hereinbefore described. The control valve 218 controls the flow of compressed air to the hoses 35 and 36 leading to the pneumatically operated motor 30 associated with the wheel 27.

It will be understood that the control valves 215, 216, 217, and 218 shown in FIG. 1 will be duplicated on the opposite side of the vehicle 10 for the purpose of controlling the operation of the other drill guiding and supporting structure 71 and for controlling operation of the motor 30 associated with the wheel 28.

The vehicle 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 also comprises a hydraulic pressure system including a hydraulic fluid pump 220 driven by an air operated motor 221, the operation of which is in turn controlled by an air valve 222 effective to control the flow of air under pressure from the longitudinal tubular member 11 to the motor 221. The pump 220 is operative to withdraw hydraulic fluid from within the upright tubular member 13, which serves as a hydraulic fluid reservoir, through a fluid line 223 including a filter 224. From the pump 220, hydraulic fluid is supplied to control valve blocks 204 and 226 through lines 227 and 228 respectively. The valve block 204 is mounted on the ladder 205 and includes a pair of hydraulic control valves 229 and 230 for controlling the flow of hydraulic fluid to respective pairs of the aforementioned hoses 159 and for operation of the aforementioned advance-retract mechanisms 73 of the drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71. A filling cap 231 is provided on the tubular member 13 for the introduction of hydraulic fluid thereinto. A hydraulic fluid return line 232 extends from the valve block 204 to the upright tubular member 13.

The valve block 226 is mounted on the longitudinal tubular member 11 in any appropriate manner and includes three hydraulic control valves 233 for controlling the supply and discharge of hydraulic jacks 180, 181, and 182 respectively.

It is also to be noted that the vehicle has suitably provided thereon a level-indicating device 236 of any appropriate type, such as a bubble level, and effective to indicate when the vehicle 10 is disposed horizontally in both the longitudinal and transverse directions.

The aforementioned lower tubular transverse member 15 of the vehicle 10 is also usefully used as a water reservoir for the water which is used for flushing dirt and dust from the drill hole. To this end, water is supplied to the transverse member 15 from a suitable source through a supply hose 237. Control valves 238 are provided for controlling the flow of water from the transverse member 15 through hoses 211 to rock drills such as rock drill 76 mounted on the vehicle 10, from which drill such water flows through hollow drill steels such as drill steel 77 as is conventional.

Another important feature provided on the vehicle 10 in accordance with the present invention comprises a lug 239 permanently mounted on the rear wheel 37. This lug functions as an odometrical means for indicating the extent of longitudinal movement of the vehicle 10 and is useful for ensuring a desired separation between drill holes formed by the use of rock drills such as rock drill 76 supported on the vehicle 10.

In use, the vehicle 10 is coupled to a suitable air compressor by the hose 212 and driven into its precise location for a drilling operation, usefully by operation of the aforementioned motors 30 under the control of the control valves 218. Having so moved the vehicle 10 to a desired location, the control valves 233 are selectively operated to permit the flow of hydraulic fluid under pressure from the pump 220 to the upper ends of the cylinders 190 of the three hydraulic jacks 180, 181, and 182 in turn to move the vehicle 10 on the mine floor into a desired level disposition as indicated by the levelindicating device 236.

The positions of the drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71 on the vehicle 10 are then adjusted by means of the adjustable mounting means 74 into the desired angular, longitudinal and transverse positions. Rock drills, such as rock drill 76 are then fitted on the carriages 84 of the drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71.

The aforementioned control valves 217 are then actuated to move the drill steel supporting members 137 of the drill steel centering devices 75 into their upright steel-engaging positions and drill steels such as steel 77 are then inserted into each of the drills 76.

The control valves 215 are then operated to cause operation of the respective drills 76 and consequently initiation of a drill hole in the roof or wall of the mine. During such operation, the control valves 216 and 229, 230 are operated as required to advance such drill steels forwardly. As soon as thedrill holes have been initiated sufficiently to make the use of the drill steel centering devices 75 unnecessary, the drill steel supporting members 137 of such devices are retracted to their steelreleasing positions by operation of the control valves 217. By retracting the drill steel centering devices in this way, wear of such devices is significantly reduced during operation of the rock drills 76.

Further forward advance of each drill steel is then obtained by operation of the respective control valves 216 and 229, 230 as will readily be understood by those skilled in the art.

When the drill holes have been completed, the drill steels 77 are withdrawn from the respective drill holes by operation of the control valves 216 and 229, 231). The control valves 233 are then operated to raise the ground-engaging plates 185 of the jacks 180, 181, and 182 respectively from the mine floor. The control valves 218 are then operated to actuate the motors 30 to move the vehicle 10 along the mine floor a desired distance for drilling a further set of bore holes. Such advance movement of the vehicle 10 along the mine floor is usefully measured by counting the number of revolutions made by the rear wheel 37 as indicated by movement of the lug 239. It will be appreciated that, by the provision of the simple lug 239, a constant predetermined distance between adjacent sets of drill holes can be ensured without any need for direct measurement. After the vehicle 10 has been advanced along the mine floor a desired distance, the control valves 233 are again operated to lower the ground-engaging plates of the jacks 180, 181, and 182 to level the vehicle 10 and to permit further bore holes to be drilled in the mine roof or wall. By levelling the vehicle 10 in this manner before each set of drill holes is bored, a desired constant drill hole angle (relative to the horizontal) is obtained in a very simple manner.

Although the invention is in no way restricted to drill-support vehicles on which retractable drill steel centering devices such as the devices 75 are provided, an alternative construction for such a retractable centering device will now be described with reference to FIGS. 8 and 9 of the accompanying drawings.

The drill steel centering device generally indicated at 240 in FIGS. 8 and 9 comprises a pair of upstanding arms 241 and 242 pivotally mounted about bolts 243 extending through upstanding transverse plates 244 and 245, which bolts are secured by nuts 246. The arms 241 and 242 are provided at their upper ends with transversely inward extensions 247 formed in their opposed inner surfaces with opposed, semicircular recesses 248 which encircle a drill steel such as drill steel 77 when the arms 241 and 242 are pivoted together to the positions actually shown in FIG. 8. On relative pivoting movement of the arms 241 and 242 away from each other under the control of a cylinder means generally indicated at 249, the drill steel 77 is disengaged by the arms 241 and 242 and consequently can readily be removed from therebetween when desired. The aforementioned inward extensions 247 are usefully reinforced by plates 250 formed with recesses aligned with the aforementioned recesses 248.

The cylinder means 249 includes a cylinder 251 provided at its blind end with an axial extension 252 pivotally connected to the arm 242 at 253. A bifurcated downward extension 254 of the arm 242 is provided for this purpose. A piston rod 255 extending from a piston 256 within the cylinder 251 is similarly pivotally connected at 257 to a downward bifurcated extension 258 of the aforementioned arm 241. Fluid hoses 259 and 260 serve to supply and discharge fluid to and from the cylinder 251 for moving the arms 241 and 242 of the centering device 240 between the positions actually shown in FIGS. 8 and 9.

In the particular embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9, the aforementioned upstanding plates 244 and 245 of the centering device 240 are secured to a base bracket 260 which is in turn secured to a rearwardly extending baseplate 261 by means of which the centering device 240 can be detachably secured on the forward end of the elongated member 78 of a respective one f the drill guiding and supporting structures 70 and 71 of the vehicle 10. For this purpose, the baseplate 261 has secured thereto a fixed guide plate 262 received within the forward end of the aforementioned keyway 127 of the elongated member 78. A bolt 263 is loosely received through a hole in a movable clamping plate 264 which is held in the keyway 128 of the elongated member 68 by means of a nut 265. Stop plates 266 and 267 are secured to the rear surfaces of the arms 241 and 242 respectively transversely outwardly of the aforementioned upstanding plates 244 and 245 respectively and each of the stop plates 266 and 267 is provided with a sloping surface 268 for abutment with an outer edge of a corresponding one of the plates 244 and 245 to prevent outward movement of the arms 241 and 242 beyond the positions actually shown in FIG. 9 and to ensure that both such arms are moved away from a drill steel on actuation of the cylinder means 249.

ill

Various modifications can be made within the scope of the inventive concept disclosed. Accordingly it is intended that what is set forth herein should be regarded as illustrative of such concept and not for the purpose of limiting protection to any particular embodiment thereof, and that only such limitations should be placed upon the scope of protection to which the inventor hereof is entitled, as justice dictates.

What is claimed is:

l. A wheeled vehicle adapted to support one or more rock drills thereon, which vehicle includes a chassis structure, a ground-engaging wheel mounted on said chassis structure for movement of said vehicle along a mine floor, at least one fluidoperated drill guiding and supporting structure angularly adjustably mounted on said chassis structure and adapted to have a rock drill detachably mounted thereon for longitudinal reciprocation relative to said chassis structure, a plurality of fluid-operated stabilizing jacks mounted on said chassis structure and each including a ground-engaging member, first fluid flow control and transfer means for the selective control of the flow of operating fluid to each of said stabilizing jacks for moving said chassis structure into and out of a predetermined disposition in both longitudinal and transverse directions relative to the horizontal, indicating means for indicating the angular disposition of said chassis structure in both said longitudinal and transverse directions relative to the horizontal, second fluid flow control and transfer means for the control of the flow of operating fluid to each fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting structure for causing longitudinal movement of said drill guiding and supporting structure relative to said chassis structure, and odometrical means associated with said ground-engaging wheel for conjoint movement therewith for indicating the extent of movement of said vehicle along the mine floor.

2. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 1, in which said odometrical means comprises a lug secured to said ground-engaging wheel for corotation therewith.

3. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 1 in which said chassis structure includes at least one hollow tubular member adapted to accommodate a vehicle-operating fluid.

4. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 1 in which said chassis structure includes a transverse structural frame member on which two said fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting structures are adjustably mounted by mounting means by means of which the longitudinal osition of each said drill guiding and supporting structure relative to said transverse structural frame member and the angular positions of each said drill guiding and supporting structure about a respective longitudinal axis of said transverse structural frame member and about a respective second axis generally perpendicular to said longitudinal axis of said transverse structural frame member can be adjusted.

5. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 4 in which first and second ground-engaging wheels are mounted on said transverse structural frame member, in which said chassis structure additionally includes a longitudinally extending structural frame. member adjustably and detachably attached to said transverse structural frame member intermediate said first and second ground-engaging wheels, and in which a third groundengaging wheel is mounted on said longitudinally extending structural frame member remotely from said transverse structural frame member.

6. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 5 which vehicle additionally includes drive means adapted to apply rotary drive motion to each of said first and second ground-engaging wheels.

7. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 5 which vehicle comprises three said stabilizing jacks, said stabilin'ng jacks being hydraulically operated and being mounted on said chassis structure in general proximity to respective one of said first, second, and third ground-engaging wheels.

8. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 7 in which each said stabilizing jack comprises axially telescopic fist and second guide members coaxially disposed about a common axis for relative axial reciprocating movement along said common axis, the ground-engaging member of each said stabilizing jack being terminally and rigidly secured to said second guide member of said stabilizing jack and each said stabilizing jack additionally comprising a double-acting fluid-operated ram pivotally connected to both said ground-engaging member and said first guide member, which ram includes a cylinder and a piston rod operative for relative reciprocating movement in a direction generally parallel to said common axis of said first and second guide members of said jack for causing relative movement of said first and second guide members along said common axis thereof.

9. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 7, in which each said drill guiding and supporting structure includes a fluidoperated cable cylinder adapted to move a rock drill supported on said drill guiding and supporting structure longitudinally with respect to said chassis structure.

10. A wheeled vehicle as defined in claim 9 in which each said fluid-operated drill guiding and supporting structure is mounted on said transverse structural frame member by means of a hydraulically operated advance and retract mechanism adapted to move said drill guiding and supporting structure forwardly and rearwardly relative to said chassis structure.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3756669 *Jan 28, 1972Sep 4, 1973Lee Norse CoApparatus for holding a rotary tool
US3896885 *Sep 10, 1974Jul 29, 1975Skanska Cementgjuteriet AbSystem for automatically aligning and/or moving in a parallel movement path a guide seating structure adapted for guiding the movement of a tool mounted thereon
US3967686 *May 19, 1975Jul 6, 1976Gosta FogelstromDevice for guiding a drill tool
US3986569 *Dec 16, 1974Oct 19, 1976Atlas Copco AktiebolagDrill string element handling apparatus
US4346766 *Mar 24, 1980Aug 31, 1982Salzgitter Maschinen Und Anlagen AktiengesellschaftDrill cradle with elongated slide track
US7997351 *Dec 17, 2008Aug 16, 2011Longyear Tm, Inc.Pneumatic drifter with replaceable foot pieces
US8056647 *Jan 22, 2007Nov 15, 2011Atlas Copco Rock Drills AbFirst and second beam for telescopic feeder, incorporating guiding studs, telescopic feeder, drilling device for rock drilling and a way of using a guiding stud
US8662199 *May 11, 2009Mar 4, 2014Atlas Copco Rock Drills AbFeed unit for a drilling machine
US20080149395 *Mar 31, 2006Jun 26, 2008Aksel FossbakkenDrilling or Service Rig
US20090283284 *Dec 17, 2008Nov 19, 2009Longyear Tm, Inc.Pnuematic drifter with replaceable foot pieces
US20100155092 *Jan 22, 2007Jun 24, 2010Richard FolinFirst and Second Beam for Telescopic Feeder, Incorporating Guiding Studs, Telescopic Feeder, Drilling Device for Rock Drilling and a Way of Using a Guiding Stud
US20110048808 *May 11, 2009Mar 3, 2011Nystroem Sven-OlovFeed unit
USRE30071 *Jun 24, 1977Aug 14, 1979Atlas Copco AktiebolagDrill string element handling apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/20, 173/189, 173/45, 173/52
International ClassificationE21B7/02, E21B15/04, E21B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B7/024, E21B7/025
European ClassificationE21B7/02J, E21B7/02I