Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3612605 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1971
Filing dateOct 17, 1969
Priority dateOct 17, 1969
Publication numberUS 3612605 A, US 3612605A, US-A-3612605, US3612605 A, US3612605A
InventorsPosey John T Jr
Original AssigneePosey John T Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Restraining device
US 3612605 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor John T. Pusey, Jr.

1739 Meadowbrook Road, Altadena, Calif. 91001 [21] Appl. No. 867,135

[22] Filed Oct. 17, 1969 [45] Patented Oct. 12, 1971 [5 4] RESTRAINING DEVICE 2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. CI 297/389 [51] Int. Cl A47c 31/00 [50] FieldofSearch 297/385,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,851,033 9/1953 Posey 297/389 X 2 /17 A 2,870,502 1/1959 Sasse 2,877,833 3/1959 Boles 297/389 3,136,311 6/1964 Lewis 297/389 3,191,599 6/1965 Kendall... 297/389X 3,306,662 2/1967 Finnigam. 297/389 3,466,090 9/1969 Posey 297/389 FOREIGN PATENTS 177,745 I 4/1922 Great Britain 297/389 Primary Examiner-James T. McCall Attamey-Christie, Parker & Hale ABSTRACT: A device for restraining a patient in a chair comprising a belt adapted to be wrapped around the midriff of the patient and releasably secured behind the back of the chair, and a pair of straps secured to the belt in front of the patient and extending diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his shoulders, and down behind the back of the chair where they are releasably secured to the belt.

PAIENTEDnm 12 I9" ATTORNE Y RES'I'RAINING DEVICE tients lateral movement, but they do not provide restraint for the patients upper torso. As a result, an invalid, an elderly patient, or a patient who is not totally conscious ,often slumps forward in his chair and sustains injuries. To remedy this problem, restraining devices for securing the patients upper torso to the back of a chair have been developed, but these devices have been objectionable for a number of reasons. For example, previous restraining devices have ordinarily used a multiplicity of straps and buckles. This makes them cumbersome and difficult to apply and release rapidly..Some previous restraining devices have used fixed harness loops, but these devices cannot be applied or released quickly or comfortably because the patients head or arms must be stuck through the harness loops. Other previous restraining devices are bulky and heavy, thereby making them uncomfortable for the patient and inconvenient for an attendant to carry about. To support a patient comfortably, some devices must be applied so loosely that it is relatively easy for the patient to slip out of them. Other devices are not easily adaptable for use with all types of chairs.

This invention provides a rugged, lightweight, low-cost restraining device for securing a patient to a chair. The device restrains the patients lateral movement and provides a longitudinal restraint for his upper torso as well. It is simple in construction and is easily and quickly applied to the patient and released in the event of an emergency, for example.

Briefly, the restraining device of this invention includes an elongated belt that is wrapped around the patients midriff and releasably secured at its ends behind the back of a chair. A pair of straps secured to the front ofthe belt extend diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his shoulders, and down behind the back of the chair where they are releasably fastened at their ends to the belt. The belt makes a snug fit around the patients waist, and the straps make a snug fit around the patients shoulders so that the patient is effectively, yet comfortably, restrained in his chair.

In use, each strap is drawn over the patients shoulder with diagonally upwardly to the right and strap 16 extends diagonally upwardly to the left. The straps cross at a point 20 4 where they are preferably secured together by conventional the desired degree of tightness and releasably secured to a respective portion of the belt behind the chair. The securing means for the belt ends and for the straps are adjustable in length so that the straining device of this invention fits patients having a wide range of sizes. It is quickly applied and released without moving the patients head or arms. Furthermore, it is not secured to any part of the chair, and is therefore adaptable for use independently of the type of chair used.

These and other aspects of the invention will be more fully understood from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a preferred form of the restraining device securing a patient to an ordinary chair;

FIG. 2 is a rear view of a wheelchair to which a patient is secured by the restraining device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan elevational view of the restraining device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a plan elevational view showing an alternative form of the restraining belt of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 5 is a plan elevational view showing a further altemative form of the restraining belt of FIG. 1.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to FIG. 3, the preferred form of the restraining device comprises an elongated belt 10 having a length sufficient to wrap around a patientss waist and the back of a chair. An elongated first strap I2 is secured to the inside of belt 10 at a location 14 to the left of a central portion 15 of the belt. An elongated second strap 16 is secured to the inside of belt 10 at a location 18 to the right of the belt's central portion 15. Strap 12 extends stitching, for example. Alternatively, a relatively short belt segment may be secured to one of the straps at location 20 by conventional stitching to form a belt loop. The other strap is then threaded through the belt loop so that the two straps are secured together at location 20.

An elongated section of a first type of Velcro material 22 is secured to the inside of belt 10 at its left end. A relatively short section of a first type of Velcro material 24 is secured to the inside of belt 10 between section 22 and location 14 where strap 12 is secured to the belt. An elongated section of a second type of Velcro material 26 is secured to the outside of belt 10 at its right end. A second relatively short section of a first type of Velcro material 28 is secured to the inside of belt 10 between section 26 and location 18 where strap 16 is secured to the belt. An elongated section of a second type of Velcro material 30 is secured to the outside of strap 12 at its end, and a second elongated section of a second type of Velcro material 32 is secured to the outside of strap 16 at its end.

The restraining device of FIG. 3 is used to secure a patient 34 to a conventional chair 36 by wrapping belt 10 around the patients midriff and drawing the ends of the belt behind an upright back 38 of the chair. Strap l2 is'extended diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his right shoulder, and down behind the back of the chair. Likewise, strap 16 is extended diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his left shoulder, and down behind the back of the chair. As seen best in FIG. 2, wherein patient 34 is seated in a wheelchair 40 having an upright back 42, the ends of belt 10 are pulled laterally across the back of the wheelchair and stuck together at Velcro sections 22 and 26 so that the belt'makes a snug, yet comfortable, fit around the patients midrifi'. Strap 12 is pulled down behind the back of the wheelchair where its Velcro section 28 is stuck to Velcro section 32 so that the strap makes a snug fit around the patients right shoulder. Similarly, strap 16 is pulled down behind the back of the chair and its Velcro section 30 is stuck to Velcro section 24 of the belt so that the strap makes a snug fit around the patients left shoulder.

The length of Velcro sections 22 and 26 is sufficient to enable belt 10 to fit patients having a wide range of waist sizes. The length of Velcro sections 30 and 32 is likewise sufficient to enable the restraining device to fit patients having a wide range of heights. In a preferred from of the invention, the belt and the straps are made of a strong, reinforced webbing which can be laundered by ordinary means. The restraining device can furthermore be made in small, medium, and large sizes to accommodate patients of different ages and sizes. The use of Velcro material as the restraining device s securing means provides substantial holding forces, enables the device to be quickly applied and released, and contributes in making the device a relatively lightweight object which is easily handled by an attendant.

FIGS. 4 and 5 show alternative securing means for belt 10 and for straps l2 and 16. In the restraining device of FIG. 4, a horizontal row of spaced-apart female-type snap fasteners 44 is located on the inside of belt 10 adjacent to its left end. A cooperating male-type snap fastener 46 is located on the inside of belt 10 adjacent to its right end. In use, fastener 46 is locked to one of fasteners 44 to provide an adjustable snug, yet comfortable, fit around the patients waist. A vertical row of three spaced-apart female-type snap fasteners 48 is located on the outside of strap 12 adjacent to its free end. A similar vertical row of three spaced-apart female-type snap fasteners 50 is located on the outside of strap 16 adjacent to its free end. A single male-type snap fastener 52 is secured to the inside of belt 10 between snap fastener 46 and location 18 where strap 16 is secured to the inside of belt 10. In use, fastener 52 is locked to one of fasteners 48 to provide an adjustable snug, yet comfortable, fit around the patients right shoulder. Similarly, a single male-type snap fastener 54 is secured to the the conventional seat belt. The end of strap 12 is doubled back on itself and laterally stitched at four spaced-apart locations to provide a vertical row of four belt loops 58 at the end of the strap. Strap 16 is doubled back on itself and similarly stitched to form a vertical row of four belt loops 60. In use, the straps are pulled down behind the back of the chair to make a snug fit around the patients shoulders. The left and right ends of belt are then respectively threaded through the particular one of belt loops 60 and 58 required to maintain the snug fit. The free end of belt 10 is then threaded through fastening rings 56 and pulled tight and held by friction to provide a snug fit around the patients waist.

lclaim:

1. An improved restraining device for restraining a patient in a chair with an upright back, the device including an elongated belt having a central portion disposed over the midriff of the patient, the belt being of sufficient length that it wraps around the patient and the back of the chair with the right and left free ends behind the back of the chair; a first elongated piece of thistle-cloth material at the right free end of the belt; a second elongated piece of thistle-cloth material at the left free end of the belt for fastening to the first piece of thistlecloth material so the free ends of the belt can be releasably stuck together behind the back of the chair immediately after the belt is drawn tightly around the patient and the back of the chair; a third elongated piece of thistle-cloth material spaced from the right free end of the belt and secured to the belt at a point behind the back of the chair; a fourth elongated piece of thistle-cloth material spaced from the left free end of the belt and secured to the belt at a point behind the back of the chair and spaced from the third piece of thistle-cloth material; an elongated right strap secured at one end to the central portion of the belt and extending diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his right shoulder, and down behind the back of the chair so the free end of the strap terminates adjacent to the third piece of thistle-cloth material; an elongated left strap secured at one end to the central portion of the belt at a point spaced from said one end of the right strap, the left strap extending diagonally upwardly across the front of the patient, over his left shoulder, and down behind the back of the chair so that the free end of the strap terminates adjacent to the fourth piece of thistle-cloth material; a fifth elongated piece of thistle-cloth material secured to the free end of the right strap for releasably fastening the right strap to the third piece of thistle-cloth material behind the back of the chair immediately after the strap has been pulled tightly over the patients right shoulder; and a sixth elongated piece of thistlecloth material secured to the free end of the left strap for releasably fastening the left strap to the fourth piece of thistlecloth material behind the back of the chair immediately after the left strap has been pulled tightly over the patients left shoulder.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the third and fourth pieces of thistle-cloth material are secured to the inner side of the belt, and the fifth and sixth pieces of thistlecloth material are secured to the outer side of the right and left straps, so the free ends of the straps fit under the belt to fasten the straps to the belt.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2851033 *Apr 19, 1954Sep 9, 1958Thornton Posey JohnSupporting means
US2870502 *Oct 21, 1955Jan 27, 1959Sasse Raymond MDriving glove holder
US2877833 *Feb 15, 1957Mar 17, 1959Boles Nolan FChild's automobile safety belt
US3136311 *Nov 13, 1961Jun 9, 1964Melrose Hospital Uniform Co InPatient support garment
US3191599 *Oct 29, 1962Jun 29, 1965Kendell Sara SRestraining harness
US3306662 *Jan 15, 1965Feb 28, 1967Finnigan Joseph CAttachment for vehicle safety belts and shoulder harness
US3466090 *Dec 6, 1967Sep 9, 1969Posey John TSafety harness
GB177745A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4132230 *Aug 23, 1977Jan 2, 1979Ladd James TRestraining garment
US4666207 *Sep 18, 1985May 19, 1987Billie Waters QuartanoChild shopping cart cushion
US4795216 *Dec 22, 1987Jan 3, 1989Culver Robert AChild retaining belt
US4867464 *Jan 26, 1989Sep 19, 1989Cook Kenna MChild restraining safety belt or harness
US4881746 *Jul 25, 1988Nov 21, 1989Sara AndreesenHandle cover and toy holder
US4925246 *Oct 14, 1988May 15, 1990Corcoran Dan EPrisoner restraint system
US5203613 *May 3, 1991Apr 20, 1993Ward Susan PRestraining devices combined with support and method of securement adjacent a crotch post
US5259338 *Nov 29, 1991Nov 9, 1993Cornell Karen LSafety harness for children
US5501505 *Sep 7, 1994Mar 26, 1996Jablonski; DavidShoulder straps for beach chair
US5540239 *Mar 10, 1995Jul 30, 1996Mcclellan; NancyChild restraint
US5628548 *Feb 28, 1996May 13, 1997Lacoste; MarvinVehicular passenger restraint systems
US5676426 *Jan 11, 1996Oct 14, 1997Vel-Tye, L.L.C.Safety harness for restraining a child
US6007156 *Sep 18, 1996Dec 28, 1999Chang; Gene HsinVertical rest helping method and apparatus
US6066026 *Nov 25, 1998May 23, 2000William T. WilkinsonRemote controlled simulated tire amusement device
US7350788Sep 24, 2003Apr 1, 2008Christina Kay BookerChild restraint apparatus
US8020939 *Nov 9, 2007Sep 20, 2011Ramatti Sp. Z.O.O.Fastening belt system for particular use in child automobile transport solutions
US8832878Aug 8, 2012Sep 16, 2014Bryan Andrew McGannApparatuses for supporting a person in an upright position
US20100171358 *Jul 8, 2010Jennifer HullSupport wrap assembly
WO1998020827A1 *Nov 12, 1996May 22, 1998Scicare Systems InternationalMultipurpose integrated activity and exercise system and methods for physically challenged persons
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/484, 297/485
International ClassificationA61F5/37
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/3792
European ClassificationA61F5/37F4