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Publication numberUS3612741 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1971
Filing dateDec 4, 1969
Priority dateDec 4, 1969
Publication numberUS 3612741 A, US 3612741A, US-A-3612741, US3612741 A, US3612741A
InventorsFred C Marshall
Original AssigneeFred C Marshall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic musical instrument employing mechanical resonators with regenerative effects
US 3612741 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Fred C. Marshall 1310 Third St., Berkeley, Calif. 94710 881,980

Dec. 4, 1969 Oct. 12, 1971 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 602,699, Dec. 19, 1966.

Inventor Appl. No. Filed Patented ELECTRONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT EMPLOYING MECHANICAL RESONATORS WITH REGENERATIVE EFFECTS 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

US. Cl 84/1.05, 84/1.06, 84/1.l6, 84/DIG. 1, 84/DIG. 10, 84/DIG.

21, 84/DIG. 26, 179/1 .1

Int. Cl G10h 3/00, G10h 3/02 Field of Search 84/1.041.06,

1.16, DIG. 1, DIG. 10, DIG. 21, DIG.

26, DIG. 27; 179/1 E, 1 J; 181/18 179/l.6 X 84/l.05 84/1.05

2,078,321 4/1937 Freimann et al 2,797,766 7/1957 Sullivan 181/31 3,064,086 11/1962 Sedley 179/100 1,938,584 12/1933 Drexl 84/1.06 2,001,723 5/1935 Hammond 84/1.05 2,672,781 3/1954 Miessner 84/1.05 3,192,304 6/1965 Rizzutti 8411.16 3,194,870 7/1965 Tondreau et a1 84/1.16 FOREIGN PATENTS 461,969 12/1949 Canada 84/1.05 961,543 5/1950 France 84/1 .05

Primary Examiner-Milton O. Hirshfield Assistant Examiner-Stanley J Witkowski Attorney-Kurt A. Tauchen ABSTRACT: A performance embellishing sound reproduction arrangement comprising an electric loudspeaker, an electric resonance device secured to the chassis of said loudspeaker in contact therewith and having a microphone and a plurality of strings tuned to selected different audiofrequencies to resonate sympathetically whenever a musical production'reproduced by the loudspeaker sounds the frequencies to which the strings are tuned, and circuitry for feeding the electric signals derived from the microphone of the resonance device back to the same loudspeaker, or to a second loudspeaker located within the range of audibility of the first-mentioned loudspeaker.

AMP

PATENTEDUCT 12 I97! 6 MIC MAMP \ MIC AMP INVENTOR.

FRED C. MARSHALL ELECTRONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT EMPLOYING MECHANICAL RESONATORS WITH REGENERATIVE EFFECTS This is a continuation-in-part of my pending US. Pat. application Ser. No. 602,699 filed Dec. 19, 1966 for a Performance Embellishing Sound Reproduction Arrangement.

The present invention relates to electric loudspeakers such as are used in connection with record players, radio and television receiving sets, and other electric musical instruments.

An object of the invention is to provide a loudspeaker arrangement which operates to embellish automatically in a pleasing manner the performance of a musical production that is delivered to the loudspeaker for reproduction, from a microphone, a phonographic tape or disc, or a radio or television receiving set.

This and other objects of the invention will be apparent frornthe following description of the accompanying drawing which illustrates certain preferred embodiments thereof, and wherein FIG. 1 is a diagram of a performance embellishing sound reproduction arrangement embodying my invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagram of another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 3 is a perspective of a component of the arrangement of my invention.

In accordance with the invention I attach to the chassis of an electric loudspeaker an electric resonance device having a plurality of strings tuned to selected different audiofrequencies, and provided with a microphone, and I feed the signals picked up by the microphone of the resonance device when its strings vibrate sympathetically in response to the same frequencies in a performance reproduced by the loudspeaker, through an amplifier back to the same loudspeaker or a second loudspeaker located within the hearing range of the first loudspeaker.

Having reference to the drawing, the top wall of the chassis 12 of a loudspeaker 14 is employed to form the base of resonance device which is in fact an electric stringed musical instrument 16. For this purpose one end of said top wall is formed into a raised ledge 18 within which the strings 20 are anchored, and near its opposite end said top wall forms a ridge 22 with a rounded top surface which constitutes the bridge" for the strings and which may have a metal covering 24. Beyond said bridge the strings are anchored in vertically disposed pegs 26 which are rotatably mounted in the top wall 10 of the speaker chassis and which may be turned by the manipulation of keys indicated at 28, to tune the strings to selected audiofrequencies.

Arranged below the strings 20 adjacent the bridge 22 is a microphone 30 which converts any vibration of said strings into electric audio signals that can be reconverted into sound in electric loudspeakers. In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the accompanying drawing the resonance device 16 on top of the loudspeaker chassis 12 has six strings 20 which are tuned to six distinctly different audiofrequencies. It will be understood, however, that the resonance device employed in accordance with my invention to embellish the performance of a loudspeaker, may be provided with more or less than six strings if desired.

When exteriorly produced electric audio signals are fed to the loudspeaker 14 through an amplifier represented by the block 32 in FIG. 1, for conversion into a musical performance, the individual strings of resonator 16 will vibrate sympathetically whenever the perfonnance contains the frequencies to which the strings are tune. Any such vibration of said strings is immediately picked up by the microphone 30 and converted into electrical audio signals. In accordance with one embodiment of the invention, I feed these signals through amplifier 32 back to the same loudspeaker 14 (FIG. 1). As a result thereof, in the performance of the loudspeaker 14, the notes corresponding to the frequencies to which the strings of the resonance device are tuned, are emphasized in a peculiar manner whenever they occur in the reproduction of a musical work. This embellishes the whole performance giving it an m st ka ssh t ts Q QWH- The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 2 differs from the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 1 in that the output of the microphone 30 of resonance device 16 is fed through an amplifier 34 to a separate loudspeaker 36 rather than the same loudspeaker. When this second loudspeaker is located within the audio range of the first loudspeaker, both speakers 14 and 36 cooperate to produce the same characteristic sound effect as obtained with the single loudspeaker embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 1.

It remains to point out that the apparatus of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 may be used as a sound-producing instrument rather than a performance embellishing loudspeaker arrangement. When a performer plucks any one of the strings 20 on top of chassis 12, the vibrations of the plucked string or strings are converted into electric current pulses in microphone 30 and after amplification in amplifier 32 these pulses are delivered to the loudspeaker 14. There they are reconverted into mechanical motion and the chassis 12 of the loudspeaker transmits the resultant vibrations through the bridge arrangement 22-24 to the strings 20. Thus, the initial vibrations of the plucked strings are sustained so that the strings continue to sound even though they are no longer being plucked. Hence, by plucking selected ones of the strings, an unusual sound performance may be produced, and may be modulated by plucking additional strings at intervals; and this performance is sustained automatically. It will be understood that in the described use of the apparatus of my invention, the loudspeaker does not necessarily have to be equipped with the usual sound-producing membrane for the apparatus to produce sound. Performance of its electromechanical transducer part is sufficient. In fact, any electromechanical transducer will operate, i.e. any transducer that converts the amplified output pulses of the microphone 30 into vibrations of a frequency corresponding to that of the plucked strings, as long as it is arranged to transmit these vibrations through acoustomechanical means, such as chassis 12 and bridge arrangement 2224, to the strings of the instrument, which then produce the sounds of the performance.

While I have described my invention with the aid of certain exemplary embodiments thereof, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific constructional details shown by way of example, which may be departed from without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Thus, devices other than the guitarlike stringed instrument 16 described hereinbefore and illustrated in FIG. 3, such as for instance, a selection of different tuning forks mounted upon the chassis of the loudspeaker, may be employed to vibrate in sympathy with and produce signals that are picked up by a microphone or microphones and emphasize selected sounds and notes of a performance.

I claim:

1. A performance-embellishing sound reproduction arrangement comprising a loudspeaker having a chassis, means for delivering exteriorly produced electric audio signals to said loudspeaker, multiple resonance means tuned to selected different audiofrequencies secured to said chassis in contact therewith and having microphone means, and means for feeding signals derived from said microphone means to said loudspeaker when said resonance means resonate during performance of said loudspeaker.

2. Arrangement according to claim 1 wherein said resonance means is an electric stringed musical instrument.

3. A performance-embellishing sound reproduction arrangement comprising a first loudspeaker, having a chassis, means for delivering exteriorly produced electric audio signals to said first loudspeaker, a second loudspeaker located in the vicinity of said first loudspeaker, multiple resonance means tuned to selected different audiofrequencies secured to the chassis of said first loudspeaker in contact therewith and having microphone means and means for feeding the electric signals derived from said microphone means when said resonance means resonate during performance of said first loudspeaker to said second loudspeaker.

4. An arrangement according to claim 3 wherein said resonance means is an electric stringed musical instrument.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3813473 *Oct 27, 1972May 28, 1974Investments LtdElectric guitar system
US3878748 *Mar 21, 1974Apr 22, 1975Larry A SpenceOral cavity controlled electronic musical instrument
US4176253 *Apr 28, 1978Nov 27, 1979Gabr Saad Z MCurrent loaded pneumatically driven loudspeaker arrangements
US4464967 *Feb 1, 1983Aug 14, 1984Reiner TrimbornElectric guitar having a guitar body and a loudspeaker attached to said guitar body
US4941388 *May 12, 1989Jul 17, 1990Hoover Alan AString vibration sustaining device
US5070759 *Jun 14, 1989Dec 10, 1991Hoover Alan AString vibration sustaining device
US5248846 *Jul 6, 1992Sep 28, 1993Yamaha CorporationMusical instrument incorporating a Helmholtz resonator
US5635656 *Dec 5, 1994Jun 3, 1997Bowden; Jack B.Harmonica jack
US5932827 *Jan 9, 1995Aug 3, 1999Osborne; Gary T.Sustainer for a musical instrument
US6034316 *Feb 25, 1999Mar 7, 2000Hoover; Alan AndersonControls for musical instrument sustainers
US6610917 *May 15, 1999Aug 26, 2003Lester F. LudwigActivity indication, external source, and processing loop provisions for driven vibrating-element environments
US6792120Feb 23, 2000Sep 14, 2004Jonathan M. SzenicsAudio signal enhancement and amplification system
US6849795Nov 5, 2003Feb 1, 2005Lester F. LudwigControllable frequency-reducing cross-product chain
US6852919Sep 30, 2003Feb 8, 2005Lester F. LudwigExtensions and generalizations of the pedal steel guitar
US6916980 *Apr 23, 2003Jul 12, 2005Kabushiki Kaisha Kawai Gakki SeisakushoAcoustic control system for electronic musical instrument
US7038123Sep 30, 2003May 2, 2006Ludwig Lester FStrumpad and string array processing for musical instruments
US7217878Sep 30, 2003May 15, 2007Ludwig Lester FPerformance environments supporting interactions among performers and self-organizing processes
US7309828Nov 5, 2003Dec 18, 2007Ludwig Lester FHysteresis waveshaping
US7309829Nov 24, 2003Dec 18, 2007Ludwig Lester FLayered signal processing for individual and group output of multi-channel electronic musical instruments
US7408108Oct 10, 2003Aug 5, 2008Ludwig Lester FMultiple-paramenter instrument keyboard combining key-surface touch and key-displacement sensor arrays
US7507902Nov 4, 2003Mar 24, 2009Ludwig Lester FTranscending extensions of traditional East Asian musical instruments
US7638704Dec 9, 2005Dec 29, 2009Ludwig Lester FLow frequency oscillator providing phase-staggered multi-channel midi-output control-signals
US7759571Oct 16, 2003Jul 20, 2010Ludwig Lester FTranscending extensions of classical south Asian musical instruments
US7767902Sep 2, 2005Aug 3, 2010Ludwig Lester FString array signal processing for electronic musical instruments
US7960640Sep 30, 2003Jun 14, 2011Ludwig Lester FDerivation of control signals from real-time overtone measurements
US8030565Nov 6, 2003Oct 4, 2011Ludwig Lester FSignal processing for twang and resonance
US8030566Nov 5, 2003Oct 4, 2011Ludwig Lester FEnvelope-controlled time and pitch modification
US8030567Oct 6, 2003Oct 4, 2011Ludwig Lester FGeneralized electronic music interface
US8035024Nov 5, 2003Oct 11, 2011Ludwig Lester FPhase-staggered multi-channel signal panning
US8314322 *Jan 3, 2007Nov 20, 2012Eric Aaron LangbergSystem and method for remotely generating sound from a musical instrument
US8477111Apr 9, 2012Jul 2, 2013Lester F. LudwigAdvanced touch control of interactive immersive imaging applications via finger angle using a high dimensional touchpad (HDTP) touch user interface
US8509542Apr 7, 2012Aug 13, 2013Lester F. LudwigHigh-performance closed-form single-scan calculation of oblong-shape rotation angles from binary images of arbitrary size and location using running sums
US8542209Apr 9, 2012Sep 24, 2013Lester F. LudwigAdvanced touch control of interactive map viewing via finger angle using a high dimensional touchpad (HDTP) touch user interface
US8717303Jun 12, 2007May 6, 2014Lester F. LudwigSensor array touchscreen recognizing finger flick gesture and other touch gestures
US8735710 *Jan 18, 2013May 27, 2014Roland CorporationElectronic stringed instrument having effect device
US8743068Jul 13, 2012Jun 3, 2014Lester F. LudwigTouch screen method for recognizing a finger-flick touch gesture
US8859876Sep 30, 2003Oct 14, 2014Lester F. LudwigMulti-channel signal processing for multi-channel musical instruments
US8878045 *Sep 14, 2012Nov 4, 2014Yamaha CorporationAcoustic effect impartment apparatus, and piano
US20080156167 *Jan 3, 2007Jul 3, 2008Eric Aaron LangbergSystem and Method for Remotely Generating Sound from a Musical Instrument
US20130061734 *Sep 14, 2012Mar 14, 2013Yamaha CorporationAcoustic effect impartment apparatus, and piano
US20130205978 *Jan 18, 2013Aug 15, 2013Roland CorporationElectronic stringed instrument having effect device
US20140013929 *Jul 10, 2013Jan 16, 2014Joseph Rasheed El-KhademAcoustical transmission line chamber for stringed musical instrument
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/723, 84/DIG.100, 984/374, 381/98, 84/DIG.210, 84/DIG.260, 84/737, 381/118
International ClassificationG10H3/24
Cooperative ClassificationY10S84/10, G10H3/24, Y10S84/21, Y10S84/26, Y10S84/01
European ClassificationG10H3/24