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Publication numberUS3614105 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1971
Filing dateJan 3, 1969
Priority dateJan 3, 1969
Publication numberUS 3614105 A, US 3614105A, US-A-3614105, US3614105 A, US3614105A
InventorsJuliana S Dandini
Original AssigneeJuliana S Dandini
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus utilizing dice and cards
US 3614105 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Juliana S, Dandini 101 Greenridge Drive, Reno, Nev. 89502 [21] Appl. No. 788,732 [22] Filed Jan. 3, 1969 [45] Patented Oct. 19, 1971 a 54 GAME rhinitis maximbiEE ANb c/fiiis 4 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs. [52] US. Cl .J 273/146, 273/152 R [51] Int. Cl A63f 9/04, A631 1/04 [50] Field of Search 273/146, 134 D, 134 DB,148,1,152.41,152.42;D34/5 (10.4) [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,597,419 8/1926 Anderson 273/146 X 164,328 6/1875 Reiz 273/146 604,401 5/1898 Lang 273/146 1,100,549 6/1914 Elkins...... 273/146 Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle Assistant ExaminerArno1d W. Kramer Attorney-Schapp and Hatch ABSTRACT: A game apparatus in which a specific form comprises a plurality of value pieces such as poker chips for division among the players and placement in one of two playing trays during the game, a plurality of cards containing picture elements, one of said cards containing at least two picture ele ments, one of which elements corresponds to a picture element of another card and the other of which elements corresponds with a picture element of a second separate card, and a special set of dice exemplified by eight cubical dice, each die having five blank faces and one face containing a marking, said markings on the eight dice indicating the numbers one through six and the pair of picture elements corresponding to the two picture elements carried on said cards.

PATENTEDBBT 1919?: 3,614,105

FIE--33- IN 5 TOR.

JUL/ANA 5. NOW I BY ATTORNEYS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a game apparatus, and more particularly to a game apparatus utilizing dice for determining the progress of play.

Games utilizing ordinary dice are will known, and have provided a large variety of games giving the public a tremendous amount of amusement and enjoyment. However, most of these games involve advancing a playing piece around a game board on a fixed path or the like, and have become somewhat complicated. Other games are more completely determined by the dice, and are therefore simpler in construction. The present invention belongs to the later class of dice games.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Thus in accordance with the present invention, a novel dice game is provided which utilizes a novel form of play, yet which has all of the advantages of determining the winner mostly by casting of lot. However, it will be appreciated, that some skill still remains in the ordinary play of the game of this invention.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a novel set of dice capable of providing a large number of combinations of results, whereby considerably variation in game play is provided in a relatively simple apparatus.

The dice of this invention will be constructed of regular polyhedrons in the usual form so that symmetrical faces are provided on a symmetrical solid geometric device, and preferably the dice are cubical. The dice are characterized by providing blank faces as well as faces with numbers, the majority of the faces being blank on each die so that the possibility of casting a large number of dice, say eight dice, will still provide a reasonable likelihood of bringing no marking in the counting position from the entire set. Another feature of the dice of this invention is to provide markings indicating number values on some faces of the dice, and picture elements representing a symbol rather than a number on other faces of the dice. In its broad aspect, the number of faces incorporating mumber markings, and the number of faces incorporating picture markings may be varied as well as the number of dice used in each set. However, the set of dice should contain blank faces as a preponderance, faces marked with numbers, and faces marked with pictures. Preferably, the dice are cubicals with each die having five blank faces and one marked face.

The game also includes a plurality of cards providing symbols corresponding to certain of the markings on the dice. In other words, there should be a card containing a picture element which matches a picture element on one face of the dice, and preferably there are at least two cards having two different picture elements matching the picture elements on the faces of two dice. In the preferred form of the invention, a cord is provided that has two picture elements to provide a correspondence with the condition where the same two pic ture elements are exposed when the dice are cast. Another card is provided to indicate a situation corresponding to the zero cast or the cast of all blank faces on the dice. It will be appreciated, that more or even less of these cards may be utilized, or suitable substitute indicators may be used, the cards being provided for convenience in the play of the games incorporating the special dice constructed according to this inventron.

A further feature of the invention is to provide two trays for use in playing the preferred game utilizing the apparatus of this invention. The purpose of the two trays is to provide two separate pots or kittys so that additional interest and variation of play is provided, without unduly adding to the game apparatus and complication of the game.

It is therefore seen that another object of the invention is to provide a game apparatus having special dice castable to expose one or more picture elements, and cards or like indicia to indicate such picture elements, said cards or indicia being capable of being bought and sold during the course of the game and owned by certain of the players.

A further object of the invention is to provide a game apparatus of the caharacter described, usable in a game having special cards and special dice together with value pieces such as poker chips played from individual ownership through a plurality of pots or the like on a plurality of trays so as to provide increased interest and variety of play.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent as the specification proceeds and the new and useful features of the game apparatus will be more fully defined in the claims attached hereto.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The preferred form of the game apparatus of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, forming a part of this description, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a game played according to this invention in progress on a table with the apparatus utilized in the game fully shown;

FIG. 2, a plan view of typical cards utilized in the preferred form of the invention; and

FIG. 3, a perspective view of a set of dice constructed according to the invention together with a typical dice cup suitable for casting same.

While only the preferred form of the invention is shown and described in detail, it should be understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the claims attached hereto without departing from the spirit of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring more particularly to FIG. I, there is shown a typical large table 11 illustrating a game played according to this invention with 14 players participating. As seen therein, a plurality of poker chips 12 are provided, and these are distributed around the table in stacks indicating ownership by each player, and on two trays or pots l3 and 14. Four cards l6, l7, l8 and 19 are provided, and these cards are owned by four different players as indicated. In addition, a set of dice 21 are provided together with the dice cup of 22 for convenience in casting the dice 21.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 2, it is seen that the card 16 simply shows a hammer, and the card 17 simply shows a bell. It is, of course, immaterial just what picture elements these cards show, but they should show two separate picture elements as indicated. It will also be noted that card 18 contains both of the picture elelments shown in cards l6 and 17. It will also be appreciated that there will be at least one marking on a die showing a hammer, and at least one marking on another die showing a bell. In this way, the two dice together will be able to show both the bell and hammer shown in card 18.

Since the actual picture markings are unimportant, picture elements other than a bell and hammer may be used, but it will be appreciated that the picture elements used should correspond between the cards and the dice. It will also be appreciated that there should be at least two picture elements and preferably three cards with one of the cards showing both elements so as to cover the combinations. If desired, a third picture element could be provided on a third card and on a third die. The additional combinations of pictures thus achieved may be provided on additional cards having further combinations of picture elements. However, the three cards with the two picture elements are basic and will illustrate a preferred form of the inveniton.

It will also be noted in FIG. 2 that a special card 19 is provided and that it contains apiecute which does not conform to any picture element on any of the die faces. lnstesad, the card 19 is utilized to match the condition where the dice expose all blank faces as shown in the layout in FIG. 3. This card will typically bear the name of the game, and I prefer to call my game Reno-Keno, and designate this as the Reno-Keno card. However, it will be appreciated that any name may be utilized to identify the game and/or card.

The card also typically shows the sun or the like with radiants extending therefrom. However, this design may also be varied as desired.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is shown a set of eight dice, each in cubical form, but each marked on only one face thereof. Six of these dice contain numbers one through six respectively, and these may be laid out in the usual dot form as shown in FIG. 3, or contain numerals or any other suitable designation. Two of the dice contain picture elements corresponding to the picture elements of cards 16 adn 17. In this way, the dice provide variable casts with a range of values extending from zero to 21. The zero condition occurs when ablank face of each die is in the counting position; the numbers one through six, as each of the mumbers one through six occur alone; and combinations of numbers which add up to a total of three and five through 21 respectively, the figure 21 being the total sum of all of the numbers one through six. In addition, the dice will show no picture element, either one of the picture elements, or both. In this way, any one of the three cards, 16 through 18 may or may not be designated. It will be appreciated that this appraatus or its equivalent is illustrative, and that variations may be made by utilizing more or less numbered dice, if desired.

The preferred game played with the game apparatus shown in FIGS. 1 through 3 is fully described below, but it should be appreciated that this game is an example of the preferred game played according to the game apaparatus of this invention.

The game is preferably played with 14 to 20 players, because a large number of players provide the possibility of substsantial winnings for one or two of the players. Obviously, when more than 20 players are present, the disadvantages attendent on large numbers of players such as infrequency of turn, and infrequency of holding a valud card occur, however, more than 20 peopls can play, if desired. In additon, less than l4 people are also able to play and enjoy the game, but at least four player should be present to spread the four playing cards around. However, too few players provide the disadvantage of reducing the relative value of holding one of the cards.

In order to play the game, the players first elect a director who simply performs a fixed administrative function and obtains no advantage by being director. He may be either one of the players or a bystander. The director collects an entry fee from each player and this entry fee is typically 20 chips. If desired, the entry fee may be raised with numbers of players less than 14, if desired. The director takes these entry fees and places them on cash tray 14 which is the main kitty or pot. Form this cash tray, 21 chips are removed and placed over on tray 13 which is designated as the Reno-Keno tray.

The director then sells the four cards to various players by auction or some other suitable method of sale, but preferably by auction. The money collected from the sale of the cards is also placed into the cash tray and play is ready to begin. It should be noted, that this auctioning procedure provides for a certain amount of skill, because the more players, the more valuable the cards will be, yet the more paid for the card the more valuable the card must be in order to recoup the cost thereof. In additon, the players not buying a card have an ad vanttage if the price piai is high because they receive winning form the cash tray, and the more money placed in the cash tray the better chance each non-card-holding player has to receive money back during play.

With the cards distributed and the cash placed in the trays as indicated, play begins typically with the player to the right of the director, although play may begin by any player selected by lot or the like, if desired. The first player casts the dice on the table, with several possibilities of combinations occuring. In one situation, one or more of the dice will show a number on the upper face, and no pictures will be shown. In this case, the director will pay the player casting the dice the total amount indicated by the exposed numbers from the cash tray 14. Accordingly, each player has a chance to recoup his entry fee and even come out with winnings.

Another combination of the dice that occurs is the case where one or more numbers shows, and one or both pictures is also exposed. If one picture is shown such as say the bell, the director will pay the amount indicated by the numbers cast to the player holding the card of the bell, the payment being taken from the cash tray as before. Similarly, if with the number or numbers shown, the die with the hammer comes up, but not the bell, the total amount will be paid to the player holding the card with the hammer. In the event that both the bell and the hammer come up, the total amount shown will be paid to the player holding the card with the bell and hammer, but the amount paid will be twice the sum of the numbers exposed. 7

Other combinations involve the situation where none of the numbers come up. In such a case, the'bell might come up, the hammer might come up, both the bell and hammer might come up, or neither the bell nor the hammer might come up. If the bell or the hammer comes up, every player must pay one chip to the holder of the respective card. If both the bell and hammer come up, every player must pay two chips to the holder of the card having both the bell and hammer. On the other hand, if no number or picture comes up, all of the upper faces of the dice being blank, then every player must pay one chip tothe holder of the Reno-Keno card.

Play continues in rotation with each player casting the dice when his turn comes up until the cash in the cash tray is exhausted. It will be noted that on the last play, the player receiving payment from the director might beentitled to more cash than is present on the tray. In this case, however, he will only be paid the amount of cash actually in the tray.

When the cash in the tray is thus exhausted, the dice containing the bell and hammer are removed from play and the cards showing the bell, hammer and bell and hammer are also removed form play. Play then continues utilizing the Reno Keno card and the cash trays with simply the numbered dice cast in rotation taking up from the position left off. Before each roll, the director will announce the value of Reno-Keno, the valve being 21 as play first continues.

The dice cast will now have the possibility of showing numbers or all blank faces. With the bell and hammer removed, the possibility of exposing all blank faces is somewhat greater, and the Reno-Keno card is still in effect. This is what make the Reno-Keno card more valuable, because a throw of all blank faces will continue to require every player to pay one chip to the holder of the Reno-Keno card. If, however, the player throws the dice so that one or more numbers show, the numbers are totaled and, if less than Reno-Keno, the director will pay that amount form the Reno-Keno tray to the person casting the dice, If, however, the player should throw the value of Reno-Keno, he is said to have made a Reno-Keno, the game ends, and he receives the amount of REno-Keno from the Reno-Keno tray," a Reno-Keno from each player, and all money paid into the cash kitty during this second round. Obviously, if the first player throws a 21 there will be no, money paid into the cash tray, but his winning will be high because of the high value of the Reno-Keno.

If, for example, the first player throws an amount of say five,

the director would pay the player five chips from the Reno- Keno tray and announce that Reno-Keno is now l6.- If the next player should throw a seven, the director would pay him seven chips from the Reno-Keno tray and announce that Reno-Keno is now nine. In other words, each time the director pays a player chips from the Reno-Keno tray, and thus depletes the number of chips in the tray, Reno-Keno becomes the value remaining in the tray. In the event that a player casts the dice to show a value higher than Reno-Keno, he must pay into the cash kitty (tray 14) the difference between the amount thrown and Reno-Keno. In this way, play continues with the holder of the Reno-Keno card receiving payment each time all blanks turn up, the Reno-Keno tray being reduced and the player paid the amount reduced from the Reno-Keno play when the number is less than Reno-Keno, and the cash kitty receiving chips whenever the number is more than Reno-Keno. However, sooner or later, someone will throw a Reno-Keno and the game will end with that player collecting the amount of the Reno-Keno tray, that amount from each of the players, and the money in the cash kitty at that time.

From the foregoing description, it is seen that the holders of 5 certain of the cards, and particularly the Reno-Keno card have a chance to gain substantial winnings. It is also seen that the player who wins by throwing a Reno-Keno has a chance to gain substantial winnings. In this way, interest remains right down until the end of play, because the first place winner is generally not determined until the very end of play.

From the foregoing description, it is seen that a novel game is provided, which utilizes a special set of dice in combination with other game pieces so as to provide a novel form of dice game capable of providing many hours of enjoyment, yet which is relatively simple in construction.

I claim:

1. A game apparatus for a plurality of playersconsisting of a first cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value one on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a second cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value two on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a third cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value three on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fourth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value four on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fifth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value five on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a sixth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value six on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a seventh cubical die having a first picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

an eighth cubical die having a second different picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a first card having the first picture element imprinted thereon,

a second card having the second picture element imprinted thereon, and

a third card having both the first picture element and the second picture element printed thereon.

2. A game apparatus as defined in claim 1, in which the first picture element is a hammer and the second picture element is a bell.

3. A game apparatus for a plurality of players consisting of a first cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value one on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a second cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value two on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a third cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value three on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fourth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value four on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fifth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value five on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a sixth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value six on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a seventh cubical die having a first picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

an eighth cubical die having a second different picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a first card having the first picture element imprinted thereon,

a second card having the second picture element imprinted thereon, a third card having both the first picture element and the second picture element imprinted thereon, and a fourth card having indicia different from the indicia on the marked faces of the dice for utilization when the dice are cast in a combination exposing only blank faces.

4. A game apparatus for a plurality of players consisting of a first cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value one on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a second cubical idie having a numerical marker indicating the value two on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a third cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value three on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fourth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value four on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a fifth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value five on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a sixth cubical die having a numerical marker indicating the value six on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a seventh cubical die having a first picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

an eighth cubical die having a second different picture element on one face thereof and having five blank faces,

a first card having the first picture element imprinted thereon,

a second card having the second picture element imprinted thereon,

a third card having both the first picture element and the second picture element imprinted thereon, a fourth card having indicia different from the indicia on the marked faces of the dice for utilization when the dice are cast in a combination exposing only blank faces, and a plurality of value pieces.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4327911 *Aug 4, 1980May 4, 1982Ptaszek George WGame apparatus utilizing a signalling means
US4678191 *Oct 4, 1985Jul 7, 1987Mills Sean RMultiple dice game
US5649704 *Jun 25, 1996Jul 22, 1997Dobbin; Terry L.Dice game method
US5997000 *Aug 22, 1995Dec 7, 1999Nakano; YoshioCombined dice and card game
US6712360 *Jul 26, 2002Mar 30, 2004Robert Terry YapleCasino card game
US7931275Mar 19, 2009Apr 26, 2011Strickland Larry CPoker game with dice
US8276915 *Nov 9, 2007Oct 2, 2012Markman Holdings, LlcGame apparatus and method
US8573595Apr 2, 2012Nov 5, 2013Alireza PirouzkhahVariable point generation craps game
WO2003039696A1 *Oct 31, 2002May 15, 2003Jonathan BedfordDice game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/146
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F1/00, A63F9/04, A63F1/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0402, A63F3/00157, A63F1/00, A63F9/0406, A63F1/067
European ClassificationA63F9/04A, A63F1/00