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Publication numberUS3614705 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 19, 1971
Filing dateJan 7, 1970
Priority dateJan 7, 1970
Publication numberUS 3614705 A, US 3614705A, US-A-3614705, US3614705 A, US3614705A
InventorsRaymond Descarries, Paul E Gaudry, B Erik Ohlson
Original AssigneeCons Foods Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System and apparatus for electrically connecting a vacuum cleaner and a remote motor driven brush tool
US 3614705 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Cited tates Inventors Appl. No.

Filed Patented Assignee SYSTEM AND APPARATUS lFOlR ELECTRTCALLY CONNECTING A VACUUM CLEANER AND A REMOTE MOTOR DRIVEN BRUSH TOOL 1 Claim, 20 Drawing lFigs.

US. Cl..

Int. Cl

339/8 R, 15/377 E, 15/377, 15/410, 339/15 H01r15/02 [50] lField of Search 15/321, 322,377,411;339/8R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,177,460 4/1965 Downey 339/119 3,339,168 8/1967 Belicka et a1. 339/5 Primary ExaminerWalter A. Scheel Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore Att0rneys-Thomas C. Betts and William S. Henry ABSTRACT: A vacuum cleaner hose having electric conductors and end fittings provided with electric terminals in which the fittings are removably connected with the hose by means of an uncured rubber ring clamped radially onto the hose by a pair of sleeves associated with the respective hose end fittings. One hose fitting is adapted for use as a handgrip and is provided with an electric terminal which automatically connects the hose conductors with the conductors of a telescoping wand. The wand is provided with a sliding contact so that in any of its retracted and elongated positions current is conducted to the motorized brush tool removably attached to one end of the wand.

FATENTEDUCT 19mm 31161 @1705 SHEET MF 5 THEIR A'VI'URNEYJ PATENTEDBC 19 3,614,705

sum 5 0r 5 INVENTORS nwvm 01251000051 THEIR ATT SRNEYS SYSTEM ANll) APPARATUS FOIl lELlEtI'lllllIlCALLY CONNECTING A VACUUM (ILlEANElIt AND A lltlEMO'lllE MO'llOIt lll lltllI/EN llIlltIJSI-ll 'IOOIL This application is a division of copending application Ser. No. 730,306 filed May 20, 1968, now 0.8. Pat. No. 3,534,317, in the name of the herein named hereof.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A system for electrically connecting a vacuum cleaner and a remote motor driven brush tool and suction nozzle is known from the prior art in which the motorized nozzle has a permanently attached rigid wand to which a length of electric cord is connected, and another separate length of cord which is clamped onto the hose, which interconnects the nozzle wand and the cleaner. In order to electrically connect the tool wand and hose the two separate lengths of cord are provided with mating plugs or electric couplings and the electric cord, which is clamped onto the hose, is plugged into a receptacle on the cleaner. This system is unsatisfactory because of all the separate connections that are required to complete it. i.e. physically connecting the cleaner, hose, and tool and also joining the electric plugs of the electric cords, and in addition because the tool wand is not separable from the tool and adjustable in length. An improved system is disclosed in the prior art in which the hose has integral conductors and the hose end fitting adapted to be inserted in the end cover of the vacuum cleaner automatically connects the hose conductors with a power source within the vacuum cleaner. However, the system associated with the motorized brush suction tool is the same as noted n the first-mentioned prior art. The improved system according to this invention however relates to the handle fitting at one end of the hose and to provision of a telescopic electrically conductive wand which is automatically electrically coupled with the hose handle fitting when these two parts are connected, as well as to the powered tool when the wand and tool are connected.

Conducting telescopic wands have been proposed in with a rotatable storage drum is provided for reeling up and paying out the cord when the length of the wand is adjusted so that a loop of the conductor is not left dangling when the wand is retracted to its shortest length. Also contemplated was a helical coil of the conductor, similar to the familiar coil cord of a telephone connecting the handset and the base. However, neither of these contemplated wands have become commercially available due to their relatively high cost.

A further feature of the system according to this invention, other than the automatic electric coupling and telescopic electric wand, is the provision of readily removable end fittings for a vacuum cleaner hose having integral conductors. It will be apparent that such a hose is more expensive than the wellknown vacuum cleaner hose without integral conductors and without end fittings having electric terminal couplings. In view of these relatively expensive components it is desirable to provide a convenient method and apparatus for removing and replacing the hose end fittings for repair purposes which can be made in the field by unskilled persons in a minimum of time. For example, it is well known that vacuum cleaner hose, in normal use over a period of time, is subjected to localized stresses adjacent the end fittings and in particular the hose handle fitting, which cause the hose to fail. However the greater length of hose is serviceable for a much longer period of time. Therefore it is highly desirable to provide hose end fittings which are quickly and easily removed and replaced on the hose after the defective part is removed by unskilled persons working in the owners home, or a local repair shop without the need for an inventory of a large number of parts. Of course, the replaced hose end fittings must be securely attached to the repaired hose so that they cannot be pulled off in an axial direction under normal conditions since exposing the electrical conductors would be dangerous for the user and subject the manufacturer to liability.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The improved system of electrically connecting a vacuum cleaner and a remote motor driven brush suction tool accord ing to this invention provides a telescopic electrically conductive wand for a motor driven remote vacuum cleaner suction tool which is automatically electrically connected to the tool and the associated hose end fitting at the same time these elements are physically united.

In addition, the system according to this invention provides an electric hose having end fittings which are easily removed and replaced for repair purposes by virtue of a crude rubber ring which is clamped onto the hose by a split sleeve part of the end fittings.

Therefore, one object of this invention is to provide an improved system for coupling a remote motor driven brush suction tool with an associated vacuum cleaner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a system according to the above object including a telescopic wand provided with electric conductors and a sliding switch interconnecting electric couplings attached to the wand adjacent its ends and adapted to be automatically coupled with an associated tool and a hose end fitting when the wand is physically united with these associated elements.

A further object of the invention is to provide a telescopic electric wand for vacuum cleaning apparatus. A particular object of the invention is to provide an. economically feasible telescopic wand having an elongated slide contact between the wand sections and having an electric cord set with ter minals adjacent each end of the wand sections.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved hose end fittings for a vacuum cleaner hose which are readily adapted for removal and replacement.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved hose end fittings for a hose having integral electric conductors which are readily adapted for removal and replacement.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved pivotal current-carrying hose handle for a hose having integral conductors.

A particular object of the invention is to provide electric circuit elements in an electric hose handle fitting which are quickly and easily removed from the handle fitting for replacement or repair and which can be expeditiously connected with conductors of the associated electric hose.

The foregoing objects and additional objects of the invention, and advantages of the subject invention, will be apparent from the following description of a presently preferred embodiment thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIG. l is a perspective view of a hose handle according to one aspect of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the hose handle shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a length of hose having a hose handle as shown in FIGS. l and 2 and a cross-sectional view of a hose fitting at the opposite end of the hose.

FIG. A is a detailed plan view showing the interior of a sleeve shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 and FIG. 4a is a view taken on line da -da of FIG. 4!.

FIG. 5 is a detailed plan view of the hand grip fitting shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 are enlarged detailed views of a terminal according to the invention and shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 9 is a plan view, partly broken away, of a subassembly shown in exploded view in FIG. 2 and in the assembled view shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. It) is a perspective view of a wand according to another aspect of the invention.

FIG. I]. is a schematic exploded view of the sliding contact of the wand shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 12-12 of FIG. it).

FIG. 13 is a partial perspective view having a section taken generally on line 13-13 of FIG. 10.

FIG. 14 is a partial view in cross section taken generally on line 14-14 ofFIG. 12.

FIG. 15 is a partly broken away perspective view of a motor driven brush suction tool having an elbow according to a further aspect of the invention.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the elbow per se of the tool shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is an exploded perspective view of the elbow shown in FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken generally on line 18-18 ofFIG. 16.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view on a small scale, of the system according to the invention having the elements disclosed in the foregoing figures of the drawing and coupled with a tanktype vacuum cleaner.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. 1 to 9 a known electric vacuum cleaner hose, generally designated 5, which is connected to a vacuum cleaner (FIG. 19) at one end, is provided with a hand grip fitting generally designated 10 at its other end. The hose has electric conductors 7 (FIG. 3) built into the hose carcass for example as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,300,571. The hose conductors 7 are connected via the handgrip fitting with the hand grip outlet 11 so that current is provided for a motor driven brush of the suction tool 150 (FIG. when the tube 12 of the hose handle is inserted into the wand (FIG. 10) or into the elbow 151 of the tool (FIG. 15) as shown in FIG. 19. If the handle 10 is to pivot relative to the hose 5 (and vice versa) the hose conductors 7 are connected with slip rings 13 and the outlet 11 is connected with slip ring brushes 38 as explained in greater detail hereinafter.

When the hose 5 and associated handle 10 are in normal use, the cleaner (FIG. 19) is pulled via the handle 10 and hose 5 so that axial stresses must be overcome to prevent relative axial movement between the hose and its end fittings throughout the life of the hose assembly. These stresses are withstood and/or absorbed, according to one feature of the invention, by virtue of a crude or uncured rubber ring 15 (FIGS. 2 and 3) which is placed on the hose 5 or is applied in the form of a tape wrapped about the end of the hose, or adjacent to the end of the hose as shown. The ring 15 may be applied over the braided hose cover or jacket 6 as shown in FIG. 3 or the cover 6 can be stripped back and the ring 15 applied directly on the hose carcass 8. The former is preferred however because the results are entirely satisfactory and time is saved when the braid stripping operation is avoided. As seen in FIG. 2 a length of each hose conductor 7 is brought out of the hose carcass 8 for connection with the slip rings 13 and for this purpose a terminal 14 is connected to each of the conductors 7 as will be explained hereinafter in connection with FIGS. 6, 7, 8 and 9.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 2 when the crude rubber ring 15 has been placed on the hose 5, an inner sleeve 16 is inserted into the end of the hose for reinforcing purposes, and a pair of half sleeve members generally designated 17 are placed over the end of the hose, including the ring 15. The free end of the wires 7 and terminals 14 are brought out through openings 18 (FIG. 4) in each sleeve half so that the terminals 14 are located outside the sleeve members 17 approximately 90 from one another. Each sleeve 17 has a clamping section 19 which is provided with a semiannular recess 20 (FIG. 4) within the interior of the clamping section 19 which receives the crude rubber ring 15. The other end 21 of the sleeve members 17 extends axially beyond the end of hose 5 and when both halves of the sleeve members are placed on the hose, slip rings 13 are mounted on the slip ring support end 21 of the sleeve member 17. The paired sleeve members 17 are held together on the hose by means of an outer bearing sleeve 22 which slides over the outer surface of the clamping sections 19 (FIG. 9) and the other ends 21 of the paired sleeve members 17 are held together by an inner bearing sleeve 23. The metal sleeves 22, 23 are called bearing sleeves because they journal the hose, assembled sleeves 17, and associated slip rings 13 i.e. the subassembly of FIG. 9 for relative angular movement within the barrel 30 of the handle 10 (FIG. 3). It will be clear from the foregoing that bearing sleeves 22 and 23 also hold the two half-sleeves 17 together and clamp the sleeve halves on the crude rubber ring 15. Lateral movement of the half-sleeve 17 is prevented by any suitable known means such as dove-tailed lands and grooves 17a, 17!) on abutting faces of the sleeves 17 (FIG. 42). Axial and angular movement of the slip rings 13 on the sleeves 17 is prevented in any suitable known manner.

The subassembly as shown in FIG. 9 and described above (i.e. the half-sleeves 17 including the slip rings 13 and bearing sleeves 22, 23 which clamp the sleeves onto the crude rubber ring 15) is inserted into the enlarged cylindrical end or barrel 30 of the handle 10 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, A well-known split lock spring 31 is received in an annular recess 32 (FIG. 3) so that it bears against the adjacent end of the outer bearing sleeve 22 for holding this hose subassembly against rearward axial movement within the handle 10. Forward axial movement is prevented by shoulder 34 of the handle 10 (FIG. 3) which bears against the inner end of the subassembly or the adjacent end of the bearing sleeve 23.

The manner of connecting the slip rings 13 with the hose conductors 7 is shown in FIG. 9 and details of the terminals 14 are shown in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8. The terminals 14 consist of a thin blade of resilient conductive material, for example PI-IOSPI'IOR BRONZE, having a series of bridge pieces 14a struck from the wide end of the terminal. As seen in FIG. 8 the bridge pieces 14a are struck in opposite directions alternately for defining a channel 14b into which a conductor 7 is inserted. The conductor is attached to the terminal by means of a punch which forms a strengthening rib 14c transversely of both series of bridge pieces projecting from each width side of the terminal. When the terminal 14 and wire 7 are connected and the terminal brought out through the apertures 18 in the split sleeves 17, the terminal 14 is placed circumferentially of the associated sleeve 17 and a slip ring 13 is pushed over the terminal. As stated earlier any suitable known arrangement can be used for holding the slip rings 13 on the sleeves 17.

A harness, generally designated 35, comprises a molded female plug 36 at one end of the harness conductors 37 and a pair of spring contacts or brushes 38, at the other end of the harness conductors 37. The conductors 37 fit in the elongated well 40 in the body of handle 10 (FIG. 5). The harness conductors are connected with the brushes 38 in any suitable manner (by means of soldering or preferably by known solderless connectors). The brushes 38 are received in openings 41 in the handle 10 which open into the well 40 and also into the interior of the body 10. The openings 41 are aligned with the slip rings 13 of the subassembly shown in FIG. 9 for engaging the brushes 38 with the slip rings 13. Any suitable arrangement may be adopted for insuring that the brushes 38 are held against the slip rings 13.

The plug 36 is provided with a bore 36a through which a lug 39 integral with the handle 10 passes. The lug 39 has an internally threaded-bore for receiving a screw fastener. A harness cover 42 is fastened at one end to the lug 39 and a pair of engaging tabs 43 at the other end of the cover 42 fit into slots (FIG. 3) provided in the barrel 30 of the handle 10. As shown in FIG. 1 a locking pin 9 is also utilized to hold the cover 42 on the handle 10.

As seen in FIG. 3 the opposite end of the hose has a push connector, generally designated 50 which is also removably attached to the hose by means of a second uncured rubber ring or tape 15' compressed on the hose 5 by means of a split or half-sleeve 17' of appropriate configuration. An inner tube 16' is also placed within the hose for reinforcing purposes, and the hose conductors 7 are connected in a known manner with contacts 53. Operation of contacts 53 is disclosed in copending application Ser. No. 648,653 which is assigned to the assignee hereof. Briefly, however. the contacts 53 are adapted to engage conductive spring fingers (not shown) within the inlet tube (not shown) of the vacuum cleaner thereby connecting the contacts 53 with an electric power source.

A wand generally designated llllt) is accordance with a further aspect of the invention, is shown in FIGS. to M. The wand comprises an outer tubular section ill of a known insulating synthetic resin material, and an inner metal tube ll l2 which is slidably supported within the outer tube in a wellltnown manner. The outer tube ll llll is provided with a channel 1113 which is attached to the tube 11111 in a known manner, for example by ultrasonic welding. A pair of conductive strips 115 (FIGS. lll, l2 and M) which are fixed in the channel 113 by means of recesses llll-tl. The recesses lllMl receive the strips 115 so that the strips 115 can be inserted easily into the channel llllll prior to connecting the channel to the outer tubular section lill of the wand. Corresponding recesses on the body of the outer tube lllll may be provided also to lock the strips securedly in place when the channel 113 is connected to the tube l 1 l.

The pins or blades llllb attached to the strips 11115 are supported in a suitable plug body llltia which closes off one end of the channel ll R3. The other end of the channel is closed by a slide contact llllli attached to a rigid cord lll7. The rigid cord 1117 is supported at one end by the contact collar 11119 pinned, riveted or otherwise attached to the metal inner tube 112. A female plug i120 incorporated in the collar M9 is electrically connected (not shown) with the slide 111% via the conductors ofthe cord M7.

The inner tube 112 is locked against axial separation from the outer tube lllli in any known manner such as a split lockwasher (not shown). Once the inner tube M2 is inserted into the outer tube lllll the channel 113 is closed at both ends since the rigid conductor 1117 or slide contact lllh cannot be separated from the channel lll3 by accident thereby exposing one end of the bare conductive strips M5.

As best shown in FllG. l]. the contact slide 111% carries brushes or spring contacts 1122 which are connected with the conductors of the rigid cord 11 l? as is well known.

When the telescoping wand lid) is assembled as shown in H0. 110 and extended its full-length, the brushes 1122 engage the ends llllba of the strip contacts so that the electric plugs 1116 and 112i) are electrically coupled via the strips lllfi, spring contacts 112 of the slide contact l 11% and rigid conductor 11117. When the inner wand section 11112 is pushed into the outer wand section llllll the slide contact M3 and rigid conductor ll? are simultaneously moved into the channel 113 with the brushes T12 sliding along the inner surfaces of strips 115. In the fully retracted position of the wand the contact slide llllii resides well within the channel H3 with the brushes 1122 engaging the end llllEbof the strips. In the retracted position of the wand the end of channel lll3 nearest the wand latch llltla is closed by the rigid conductor cord 1117 and the collar 1119 abuts the adjacent end of the outer tube to form a stop.

As shown in FIG. 13 the metallic inner tube M2 is provided with a series of notches ll2l which are engaged by a finger (not shown) on the wand latch llltla, so that the length of the wand can be adjusted to a variety of lengths.

Another aspect of the system according to the invention is illustrated in lFlGS. l5-llh3 wherein a suction tool or nozzle having a motor driven brush is generally designated 11%. The nozzle i156 is of known construction except for the elbow generally designated ll5ll, which is pivotally connected thereto in a known manner. The elbow 1511 per se which is best shown in FIGS. 16 and 17, comprises a hollow stem 152 which is adapted to receive the tapered end of the inner tube 112 of the wand llllll (H6. as shown in FIG. 11%. An appropriate plug 153, which isattached to the stem M2 is coupled with a pair of conductors 154. Each of the conductors M45 is connected to a brush 1155 and, as best shown in FIG. iltl, each brush engages the inner surface of a collector cup rss. The collector cups 156 are connected with the motor (not shown) of the tool 150 by a len th 0t: wire in known manner. it will be apparent from the oregomg description of H68. lid to llhl that the elbow is free to pivot relative to the tool without flexing the conductors 15d attached to the moving elbow. The cups 1156 are held against movement by attachment to the tool in a suitable manner.

The system according to the invention, as illustrated in FIG. 19, therefore provides automatic electric connection between the hose 5 and handle ill) (which also allows the hose to pivot within the handle), as well as between the handle 10 and telescopic wand llllll when these elements are physically united, and between the wand plug and the elbow 1152 when these elements are physically united.

it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications can be made in the various elements of the system disclosed above and therefore the foregoing is given by way of example only.

We claim:

ll. The combination comprising a fluid-conductin g hose, including a carcass, an end fitting at least at one end of said hose, a ring of uncured rubber on said hose adjacent said one end, first means comprising a pair of split sleeve members for radially compressing said ring on said hose, each said split sleeve having a semiannual recess for receiving and confining said ring, at least one bearing sleeve member overlying said split sleeves and holding said split sleeves against radial separation, second means for connecting said fitting with said first means, conductor means integral with said carcass, said pair of split sleeve members having an axial extension remote from said semiannular recess, a pair of axially spaced slip rings on said axial extension connected with said conductor means, a second bearing sleeve member on said axial extension, said end fitting comprising a handle member having an open barrel portion for receiving said split sleeve members and assembled slip rings and bearingsleeve members, said barrel portion having openings aligned with said slip rings, harness means having a pair of brushes extending through said openings for engaging said slip rings, said harness means including a plug connected to said handle adjacent one end thereof, a telescoping wand connectable to said end fitting, said wand having an outer tubular'wand section and an inner tubular wand section, said inner section being adapted to slide within said outer section, channel means connected with said outer wand section, a pair of spaced parallel elongated conductor strips within said channel means, rigid conductor means connected with said inner wand section and slidable within said channel, sliding contact means connected with rigid conductor means for engaging said elongated conductor strips, a suction tool having a motor driven brush means and a pivotal elbow adapted to connectively receive said inner tubular wand :section, a plug member connected with said elbow adjacent one end of said elbow for electrically connecting said plug with said rigid conductor means, a pair of conductors connected to said plug at one end, each conductor having a brush at the other end, and a pair of spaced collector cups connected with the motor of said motor driven brush means and disposed coaxially with the pivotal axis of said elbow, each brush movably engaging one of said collector cups for electrically coupling said motor and said elbow plug.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3177460 *Oct 5, 1961Apr 6, 1965Electrolux CorpEnclosed electric connector support
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4204297 *Jan 10, 1979May 27, 1980Mototsugu KurodaVacuum cleaner
US4557535 *Sep 17, 1984Dec 10, 1985Whirlpool CorporationElectrical hose swivel connector for canister vacuum cleaner
US4652063 *Nov 28, 1984Mar 24, 1987Atlantic Vacuum Parts Corp.Electrified vacuum cleaner hose adapter
US4804333 *Mar 20, 1987Feb 14, 1989Atlantic Vacuum Parts Corp.Electrified vacuum cleaner hose adapter
US4826444 *Mar 23, 1987May 2, 1989Atlantic Vacuum Parts Corp.Electrified vacuum cleaner hose adapter
US4963100 *Feb 10, 1989Oct 16, 1990Atlantic Vacuum Parts Corp.Electrified vacuum cleaner hose adapter
US4969837 *Feb 10, 1989Nov 13, 1990Atlantic Vacuum Parts Corp.Electrified vacuum cleaner hose adapter
US5109568 *Jun 15, 1990May 5, 1992Rexair, Inc.Handle assembly for a vacuum system cleaning tool
US5311638 *Jul 2, 1993May 17, 1994The Regina CompanyCleaning device
US5351362 *Jul 22, 1992Oct 4, 1994Wessel-Werk G.M.B.H. & Co. KommanditgesellschaftActive vacuum cleaner nozzle
US5389004 *Apr 23, 1993Feb 14, 1995Electrolux CorporationHandle and wand system for vacuum cleaner
US5472346 *Oct 12, 1994Dec 5, 1995Electrolux CorporationSwivel joint for vacuum cleaner
US5551731 *Oct 12, 1994Sep 3, 1996Electrolux CorporationHandle system for vacuum cleaner
US5740583 *Apr 22, 1996Apr 21, 1998Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Electric vacuum cleaner
US7168127 *May 3, 2005Jan 30, 2007Nationwide Sales & Service, Inc.Vacuum cleaner handle assemblies and adapters mating therewith
US7883116 *Jun 27, 2005Feb 8, 2011Omec S.P.A.Telescopic tube for electric household appliances equipped with electricity conduction means
US7937792Oct 19, 2006May 10, 2011Black & Decker Inc.Pole scrubber
US8272098 *Nov 29, 2007Sep 25, 2012Dyson Technology LimitedHose and wand assembly for a surface treating appliance
US8347454Nov 21, 2008Jan 8, 2013Dyson Technology LimitedSwivel electrical connector for a suction head of a surface treating appliance
US20100095479 *Nov 29, 2007Apr 22, 2010Dyson Technology LimitedHose and wand assembly for a surface treating appliance
US20110219567 *Mar 12, 2010Sep 15, 2011G.B.D. Corp.Reconfigurable upright surface cleaning apparatus with a powered brush motor
US20120180242 *Aug 3, 2010Jul 19, 2012Kwang Dong Hitech Co., Ltd.Extension pipe assembly for a vacuum cleaner
DE10314800B3 *Apr 1, 2003May 19, 2004Fischer Rohrtechnik GmbhCombined telescopic suction tube and electrical cable holder for vacuum cleaner, holds plug, socket and cable assembly in casing sections on suction tube with sliding lock
DE102004004009A1 *Jan 27, 2004Aug 18, 2005Fischer Rohrtechnik GmbhA method by which electrical connection may be made over a telescopic vacuum cleaner hose has a spiral wound cable which is protected by telescopic covers
DE102004004009B4 *Jan 27, 2004Feb 2, 2006Fischer Rohrtechnik GmbhTeleskopierbares Staubsauger-Saugrohr mit einem in Kabelkanälen geführten elektrisch leitenden Kabel
EP0835632A2 *Jul 23, 1997Apr 15, 1998Bosch-Siemens Hausgeräte GmbHAdjustable electrical connection device for telescopic vacuum cleaner hose
WO2009066050A1 *Nov 7, 2008May 28, 2009Dyson Technology LtdA surface treating appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/23, 15/410, 15/327.7, 15/377
International ClassificationA47L9/28, A47L9/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/2868, A47L9/246, H01R23/10
European ClassificationA47L9/28P, A47L9/24B4, H01R23/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 19, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: ELECTROLUX CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS, INC.;WELLS FARGO & CO.;FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:009773/0310
Effective date: 19980831
Nov 6, 1998ASAssignment
Owner name: EL ACQUISITION CORPORATION, N/K/A ELECTROLUX CORP.
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BANKBOSTON NA;REEL/FRAME:009580/0655
Effective date: 19980831
Jan 5, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS INC.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ELECTROLUX CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005206/0691
Effective date: 19891024
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON SECURITIES CORP.
Owner name: WELLS FARGO & CO.
Owner name: WESRAY CAPITAL CORPORATION
Nov 7, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS INC.,
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON SECURITIES CORP.
Owner name: WELLS FARGO & CO.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ELECTROLUX CORPORATION A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:005195/0287
Effective date: 19891024
Owner name: WESRAY CAPITAL CORPORATION
Jun 9, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:EL ACQUISITION CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004923/0862
Effective date: 19871030