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Publication numberUS3614982 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1971
Filing dateSep 22, 1969
Priority dateSep 22, 1969
Publication numberUS 3614982 A, US 3614982A, US-A-3614982, US3614982 A, US3614982A
InventorsKrizman John M
Original AssigneeKrizman John M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooling system
US 3614982 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. M. KRIZMAN COOLING SYSTEM Oct. 26,-1971 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 22, 1969 INVIiN I ()R. (JOHN M. KR/ZMAN {glue/L & Mfume A T TORNE Y5 Oct. 26, 197] J. M. KRIZMAN COOLING SYSTEM 5 Silents-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 22, 1969 INVIZN'I'OR. (JOHN M. KR/ZMAN @MA, 2 Wm fa ATTORNEYS Oct. 26, 1971 J. M. KRIZMAN 3,514,932

COOLING SYSTEM Filed Sept. 22, 1969 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 [NV/5N7 ()R. dOHN M. KR/ZMAN 6/1 A, 0: Min k ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,614,982 Patented Oct. 26, 1971 US. Cl. 16551 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An improvement to a cooling system which includes a radiator for the circulation of a liquid coolant therethrough and a coolant receptacle connected to the over-.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a cooling system including a radiator which serves as a heat-exchanger for a liquid coolant and concerns specifically an improvement to the system in which a uniquely designed liquid coolant receptacle is connected to the overflow outlet of the radiator and is supported adjacent the radiator by a wire holder.

In cooling systems for water cooled internal combustion engines and similar liquid-cooled prime movers utilizing radiators, air is drawn into the radiator in each such system through the radiator overflow outlet as the coolant cools and contracts after engine shut-down. This air is later caused to be entrained within the coolant during subsequent operation of the engine, thereby reducing the cooling efficiency of the coolant system and increasing the incidence of rust formation and corrosion Within the engine and radiator. To prevent air from being drawn into the radiator, a coolant receptacle is connected to the radiator overflow outlet and serves to provide a reservoir for additional coolant which is drawn into the radiator as the coolant therein cools. This system is described generally in US. Pat. 3,265,048.

This invention relates to an improvement in the aforementioned cooling system, and specifically concerns the design of the coolant receptacle and the holder therefor. The receptacle has top and bottom walls interconnected by two parallel side walls and two end walls. An upper coolant overflow outlet is located in one end wall and a lower opening is located in the other end wall of the receptacle. The side walls of the receptacle include symmetrical protruding wall portions which interlock with U-shaped brackets of the holder which is attached to a support adjacent the radiator. The radiator overflow outlet is connected by a conduit to the lower opening in the receptacle. T he receptacle and holder are designed so that the relative positions of the lower opening and upper overflow outlet in the receptacle can be reversed by turning the receptacle and reseating it within the holder, thereby enabling the receptacle to be positioned within the engine compartment of an automobile or similar vehicle so as to accommodate various types of radiators and their connections.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a receptacle for an additional supply of liquid coolant for a cooling system in which the receptacle is connected to a radiator of the coolant system and is reversibly seated in a holder attached to a support adjacent the radiator.

Other objects of this invention will become apparent upon a reading of the inventions description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A preferred embodiment of this invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description wherein:

FIG. l is a fragmentary perspective view of the engine compartment of a vehicle showing the liquid coolant receptacle of this invention connected to the coolant system of the vehicle.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the liquid coolant receptacle and holder of this invention in separated form.

FIG. 3 is a front elevation of the liquid coolant receptacle of this invention shown seated in its holder.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of the liquid coolant receptacle of this invention shown seated in its holder.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The preferred embodiment illustrated is not intended to be exhaustive or limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. It is chosen and described in order to best explain the principles of the invention and its application and practical use to thereby enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the invention.

A portion of the engine compartment of a vehicle 5 is illustrated in FIG. 1. A radiator .10 constitutes a part of the engine cooling system of vehicle 5 and is connected by a suitable conduit (not shown) to the block of a liquid-cooled vehicle engine (not shown). A fan 12 (shown only partially) is utilized to draw air through radiator 10 and provides means for cooling the coolant liquid being circulated through the radiator. A liquid coolant receptacle 14 is mounted adjacent radiator 10 by a wire frame support or holder 16 attached to tender well 17 of the vehicle.

Holder 16 is best illustrated in FIGS. 2-4 and is formed from flexible shape-retaining wire. Holder 16 includes two generally parallel oppositely spaced U- shaped wire brackets 18. Each bracket 18 includes a pair of upstanding legs 20 interconnected at their lower ends by a base member 22. Brackets 18 are connected by an integral transverse connecting member 24 which extends between the upper ends of one pair of corresponding legs 20. The upper ends of the other pair of corresponding bracket legs 20 are formed into hook parts 26 which are preferably coplanar with the legs and which preferably project slightly above the level of connecting member 24. A rectangularly formed reinforcement part 28 may be positioned at least partially around brackets 18 and attached thereto by having sections soldered or otherwise bonded to legs 20 at the outer surfaces thereof.

Liquid coolant receptacle 14 is of a six-sided shape and is preferably formed from a durable shape-retaining 3 material, such as polyethylene. Receptacle 14 includes a top wall 30, a bottom wall 32, two parallel side walls 34 and two end walls 36. Side walls 34 extend upwardly at right angles from bottom wall 32. The side walls 34 and bottom wall 32 include protruding wall portions 38 which extend continuously from one side wall 34 around bottom wall 32 to the other side wall 34. Wall portions 38 preferably include substantially flat outer face parts 39 joined to the remainder of the side and bottom walls by parallel web parts 40 which are inwardly spaced from the planes of the outer surfaces of the end walls 36. The wall portions 38 of the side walls may extend upwardly to the plane of the outer surface of top wall 30 or, as illustrated in the drawings, may be inwardly spaced from the top wall to form web parts 42 which parallel and are equally spaced from the bottom wall 32.

The junction of one end wall 36 and top wall 30 and the junction of the other end wall 36 and bottom wall 32 are coved. Projecting laterally from each cove 44 and paralleling the planes of the outer surfaces of top wall 30 and bottom wall 32 are nipples 46. Each nipple 46 is preferably centered between side walls 34 and preferably terminates slightly inwardly from the plane of the outer surface of the adjacent end wall 36, as best illustrated in FIG. 3. Top wall 30 of receptacle 14 includes an opening 48 which is preferably centered therein and which is defined by an upwardly projecting annular flange 50. Flange 50 is threaded so as to receive a twist-on cap 51. The distance between opposite side wall surfaces 35 as measured from one side wall to the other is substantially equal to the spacing between legs 20 of each holder bracket 18. Also the distance between the outer surfaces of parallel web parts 40 of receptacle wall portions 38 is preferably substantially equal to the spacing between brackets 18. The spacing between end runs 31 of reinforcement part 28 is greater than the distance between the outer surfaces of receptacle end walls 36.

Receptacle 14 is seated in holder 16 by first inserting bottom wall 32 between legs 20 of each bracket 18 with the legs 20 having hook parts 26 formed at the ends thereof engaging one side wall 34 and straddling wall portion 38 of the side wall along web parts 40 thereof, and with the legs 20 joined by connecting member 24 engaging the opposite side wall 34 and straddling wall portion 38 thereof along its web parts 40. Connector member 24 engages the face part 39 of this last mentioned wall portion 38 and causes legs 20 connected thereto to be outwardly flexed, as illustrated by broken lines in FIG. 4. Receptacle 14 is then pushed into holder 16 until base members 22 of the holder brackets are engaged by bottom wall 32 and straddle the wall portion 38 thereof, as best illustrated in FIG. 3. As bottom wall 32 is caused to engage holder base members 22, connector member 24 of the holder cams over the upper edge of face portion 39 and forms an abutment, as best shown in FIG. 4, with web part 42 of the wall portion so as to restrict free vertical movement of the receptacle within the holder. It is to be understood that in those constructions of the receptacle in which the wall portions 38 of side walls 34 extend to the plane of top wall 30, connecting member 24 will overlap an upper wall portion edge when the receptacle is fully seated within holder 16 with legs 20 depending therefrom straddling the edge associated wall portion. Receptacle 14 may be removed from holder 16 by an upward pull which causes connector member 24 of the wire support to be cammed over the abutted web part of the receptacle.

To install holder 16 and receptacle 14, the holder is first positioned near the radiator and as high as possible within the engine compartment. Metal screws 50 or similar fastener means are inserted through hook parts 26 of the holder and are turned into pilot or guide holes formed, such as by drilling, in fender well 18 of the vehicle. Receptacle 14 is then inserted into holder 16 in the manner previously described. Radiator overflow conduit 52 is disconnected from the radiator overflow outlet 53 and connected, using clamps if necessary, to the upper nipple 46 of receptacle 14. A conduit 54 is connected at one end to the lower nipple 46 of the receptacle and at the other end to the radiator overflow outlet. If the relative position of nipples 46 will not permit proper connection of receptacle 14 to the radiator, the receptacle can be withdrawn from holder 16 and turned about its vertical axis and reinserted therein so as to cause a reversal of the relative positions of the nipples. The receptacle is then approximately three-fourths filled, through opening 48 therein, with liquid coolant, and the cap of the receptacle threaded onto flange 50. The radiator is then filled with coolant until conduit 54 is filled and the level of the coolant in the radiator is above the radiator overflow outlet.

If desired, indicia may be placed on receptacle 14 to indicate approximate coolant levels therein. To accommodate various constructions of fender wells and similar mounting places within the vehicle, legs 20 to which hook parts 26 are connected may be bent, such as illustrated by broken lines in FIG. 2, to enable holder 16 to be rigidly attached to the vehicle and positioned in vertical orientation.

What I claim is:

1. In a cooling system inclding a radiator for the circulation of liquid coolant therethrough and and having a coolant overflow outlet, and a coolant receptacle in fluid communication with said radiator overflow outlet, the improvement comprising:

a flexible shape-retaining wire holder attached to a support adjacent said radiator, said holder including two generally parallel oppositely spaced U-shaped brackets each having a pair of upstanding legs and a base member connected to the lower ends of said legs, said brackets joined by a connecting member extending transversely of said holder and connected to the upper end of a corresponding leg of each bracket,

said receptacle having bottom and top walls joined by two generally parallel side walls extending at substantially right angles to said bottom wall and two end walls, said bottom and side walls having adjoining wall portions protruding outwardly relative to the outer surfaces thereof and extending from one side wall around the bottom wall to the other side wall, said wall portions defined by face parts joined to said bottom and side walls at the outer surfaces thereof by parallel first and second web parts, said first and second web parts, being inwardly spaced from the planes of the outer surfaces of said end walls and spaced substantially the same distance apart as said brackets, the outer surfaces of said side walls being spaced substantially the same distance apart as the legs of each bracket, each of the wall portions of said side walls being defined by a third face part-toside wall joining web part spaced below the plane of the outer surface of said top wall and disposed parallel to said bottom wall, each third web part being spaced substantially the same distance from the plane of the outer surface of said bottom wall as the length of a bracket leg measured between its base member and said connecting member,

said receptacle being reversibly seated within said holder and retained therein by having its wall portions disposed between holder brackets with said first and second web parts of said wall portions engaged by the legs and base members of said brackets and with one said third web part engaged by said connecting member.

2. The cooling system of claim 1 wherein said holder includes a peripheral reinforcement member extending in a transverse plane relative to said holder from intermediate a leg of one bracket around the other said bracket to intermediate the remaining leg of said one bracket, said reinforcement member having a configuration conforming in shape to the cross-sectional configuration of said receptacle and at least partially encircling said receptacle with clearance.

3. The cooling system of claim 1 wherein the junction of said top wall and one end Wall and the junction of said bottom wall and the other end wall are coved, a nipple extending outwardly of each coved junction and positioned inwardly of the intersecting planes of the outer surfaces of the walls forming the coved junction, a conduit connecting the radiator over-flow outlet to the nipple at the coved junction at the bottom wall.

4. The cooling system of claim 1 wherein each bracket has a loop formed at the free end of a leg to receive fastener means for attaching said holder to said support, the upper portion of said last mentioned leg being bendable to facilitate attachment of the holder to said support.

5. The cooling system of claim 4 wherein the nipple at the coved junction at the bottom wall is positioned adjacent one of said first and second web parts and pro- 1,936,517 11/1933 Maine 24831l X 2,658,707 11/1953 Heuer 248311 X 3,499,481 3/1970 Avrea 165-407 X FOREIGN PATENTS 1,158,258 1/1958 France 248-313 ALBERT W. DAVIS, JR., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3757984 *Aug 16, 1971Sep 11, 1973Fre Bar IncCooling system container
US3982587 *Nov 20, 1974Sep 28, 1976Stewart-Warner CorporationVehicular radiator assembly
US4346865 *Feb 28, 1980Aug 31, 1982Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Fitting structure for a tank
US4465254 *Jun 10, 1982Aug 14, 1984Nissan Motor Company, LimitedStructure for fitting a tank for an automotive vehicle
US4677943 *Mar 3, 1986Jul 7, 1987Skinner Alan AAutomotive non-pressure cooling system
US4795119 *Sep 15, 1986Jan 3, 1989American Telephone And Telegraph CompanyMounting bracket
US5826845 *Nov 19, 1996Oct 27, 1998Chrysler CorporationSupport structure for a reservoir in a motor vehicle
US5931228 *Jan 21, 1998Aug 3, 1999Modine Mfg. Co.Cooling module having a mounting plate with integral attachment sites and channels
CN101793188A *Mar 30, 2010Aug 4, 2010奇瑞汽车股份有限公司Expansion tank
DE102008006011A1 *Jan 25, 2008Jul 30, 2009GM Global Technology Operations, Inc., DetroitBefestigungsmittel
EP1255029A1 *May 3, 2002Nov 6, 2002Renault s.a.s.Sub-assembly for a motor vehicle with an expansion tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/51, 248/313, 123/41.27, 248/311.2, 165/138, 123/41.54
International ClassificationF01P11/02, F01P11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01P11/029
European ClassificationF01P11/02E