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Publication numberUS3615108 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1971
Filing dateMar 24, 1969
Priority dateMar 24, 1969
Publication numberUS 3615108 A, US 3615108A, US-A-3615108, US3615108 A, US3615108A
InventorsToth Stephen E
Original AssigneeSajar Plastics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Escutcheon plate
US 3615108 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 26, 1971 s. E. TOTH 356155108 ESCUTCHEON PLATE Filed March 24, 1969 v 5 shb is sheet 1 2o INVENTOR.

STEPHEN E. TOTH AT TORNEYS.

S. E. TOTH ESCUTCHEON PLATE Oct. 26, 1971 3 Shoots-Shoot 2 Filed March 24, 1969 ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent 3,615,108 ESCUTCHEON PLATE Stephen E. Toth, Brooklyn Heights Village, Ohio, assignor to Sajar Plastics Inc, Middlefield, Ohio Filed Mar. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 809,551 Int. Cl. F16] 5/00 U.S. Cl. 285-46 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An escutcheon plate for use with plumbing fixtures is molded in one-piece of synthetic plastic material. The plate has a central circular hole through which a pipe or the like is received. A plurality of resilient fingers project rearwardly from the plate adjacent the hole. The fingers include gripping portions projecting radially inward and lying on the circumference of a circle having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the hole.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This application pertains to the art of escutcheon plates and more particularly to escutcheon plates for use with plumbing fixtures. The invention is particularly applicable to escutcheon plates for covering a hole in a wall through which plumbing pipes extend, and will be described with particular reference thereto, although it will be appreciated that the invention may be used in environments other than plumbing.

In installing plumbing fixtures such as toilets, wash basins and bathtubs, Water supply pipes and drain pipes extend through holes in a wall or floor. Such holes in a wall or floor are commonly larger than the pipes which extend therethrough and also are somewhat jagged so as to present a poor appearance. Therefore, it is conventional to place an escutcheon plate over such pipes to cover the holes in the wall or floor and thereby improve the appearance of the plumbing installation. In the past, many different types of escutcheon plates have been used. One prior type included two C-shaped segments pivoted together at one end. In this type of plate, the presence of a pivot pin and two joints where the segments fitted together created a somewhat poor appearance and also offered cracks in which dirt would eventually become lodged and further impair the appearance. Other plates included a rearwardly extending flange around a central hole and a setscrew was threaded laterally into the flange in order to clamp the plate in position on a pipe. This type of arrangement required an opening in the outer periphery of the plate so that a screwdriver could be inserted through the opening for turning the setscrew. Such an opening impaired the appearance of the plate and installation of such a plate is very difficult and time consuming. Other prior plates have included a rearwardly extending flange adjacent a central opening with the flange having an inner circumferential groove machined in its surface and an elastomeric ring positioned in the groove. The elastomeric ring would then frictionally retain the plate on a pipe. Such prior devices as these have been very expensive to manufacture. Other prior escutcheon plates have included metallic ones having spring fingers adjacent the central hole through which a pipe is received and the spring fingers would frictionally grip a pipe to hold the plate in position.

Prior escutcheon plates have been made of metal which would eventually corrode from constant contact with moisture usually found in plumbing installations. Such corrosion severely impairs the appearance of a plumbing installation and also makes removal of such a plate extremely ditficult when repairs are necessary. For example,

"Ice

when a pipe must be replaced it would often be found that the escutcheon plate was welded by corrosion to the pipe on which it was positioned.

It would be desirable to have an escutcheon plate made of a material which would not corrode after a long period of use. At the same time, it would be desirable to have such a plate which was arranged to securely hold itself in place by a friction grip on a pipe and would not easily come loose. It would also be desirable to have such an escutcheon plate which was ready for application around a pipe immediately after its initial formation without requiring additional manufacturing steps such as machining grooves or threads, or slitting and deforming.

SUMMARY In accordance with the present invention, an escutcheon plate is molded in one-piece of synthetic plastic material which is not subject to corrosion of deterioration after long installation. The plate of the persent invention is molded in such a manner that it is ready for use immediately after removal from a mold and no machining or forming operations need be performed.

More specifically, the plate of the present invention comprises a body member having an outer periphery and a circular inner periphery defining a central hole axially through the body. The body has front and rear surfaces defined by a wall extending between the outer and inner peripheries. The outer periphery of the body is displaced rearwardly from the hole a predetermined distance. A plurality of resilient fingers project rearwardly from the rear surface and adjacent the hole. The fingers have terminal ends spaced rearwardly of the hole a distance not greater than the rearward spacing of the outer periphery from the hole. In addition, the terminal ends of the fingers lie in a plane which is substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body member. The fingers have outer surfaces which intersect this plane and define a plane disc. The outer surfaces of the fingers intersect this plane disc at an angle not less than The fingers also have first and second inner surfaces. The first surfaces extend rearwardly of the body adjacent the hole and also intersect the plane disc at angles not less than 90. The second inner surfaces of the fingers intersect the plane disc at angles substantially less than 90 to provide a cam surface for easy installation of the plate over a pipe. The first and second inner surfaces of the fingers intersect at positions which define gripping surfaces. The gripping surfaces lie on the periphery of a cylinder which has a diameter less than the diameter of the hole through the body member. In this manner, a pipe having an exterior diameter only slightly less than the hole through the body member will be tightly gripped by the gripping portions of the resilient fingers.

In a preferred arrangement, the second inner surfaces of the fingers intersect the plane disc at angles not less than 45 so that the camming action is primarily outward when installing the plate over a pipe. In one arrangement, the fingers extend rearwardly substantially the same distance as the outer periphery of the body member to provide support for the body member when it is lying on a floor so that it will not be broken if stepped on.

In a preferred arrangement, the fingers are a predetermined length having a midpoint. The gripping portions of the fingers are spaced rearwardly from the midpoint so that the bending action of the fingers is optimized. Also in accordance with the preferred arrangement, the gripping portions of the fingers are arcuate so as to grip large peripheral portions of a pipe rather than gripping at many points. In addition, the arcuate shape of the fingers increases their bending resistance so that a strong gripping force is provided even though a thin wall section is used for the fingers.

It is a principal object of the present invention to provide an escutcheon plate which is very economical to manufacture and very simple to install.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide such an escutcheon plate which is molded in onepiece of synthetic plastic material.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide such an escutcheon plate with resilient fingers which frictionally grip a pipe on which the plate is installed.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide such an escutcheon plate with gripping fingers which per mit some angular adjustment of the plate on a pipe.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a plumbing installation having the escutcheon plate of the present invention incorporated therein;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational View of the escutcheon plate of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view thereof looking in the direction of arrows 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a rear plan view thereof looking in the direction of arrows 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional elevational view taken on line 55 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is the same view as FIG. 5 and including a pipe extending through the central hole in the escutcheon plate of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatical illustration showing the angular relationship of the outer surfaces of the resilient fingers on the escutcheon plate of the present invention with respect to a defined plane;

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatical illustration of the angular relationship of first inner surfaces on the resilient fingers of the escutcheon plate of the present invention with relation to a predefined plane;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatical illustration showing the angular relationship of second inner surfaces on the resilient fingers of the escutcheon plate of the present invention with respect to a predefined plane;

FIG. 10 is a plan view of the escutcheon plate of the present invention installed over a rod having a square cross-sectional shape;

FIG. 11 is a plan view similar to FIG. 10 with a rod having a hexagonal cross-sectional shape;

FIG. 12 is a top plan view of a modified escutcheon plate;

FIG. 13 is a side, elevational cross-sectional view taken on line 1313 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a rear elevational view looking in the direction of arrows 1414 of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a side, elevational cross-sectional view of the escutcheon plate of FIGS. 12-14 in installed postion; and

FIG. 16 is a diagrammatic illustration of angular relations of surfaces on the plate of FIGS. 12-14 relative to a reference plane.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, wherein the showings are for purposes of illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention only and not for purposes of limiting same, FIG. 1 shows a wash basin A attached to a wall B. Wash basin A may have a faucet and spigot assembly C suitably connected to water supply lines in a conventional manner. A drain pipe D provides commuication between a suitable outlet in wash basin A and a drain pipe D leading to a waste disposal system. Drain pipe D extends through a suitable hole 12 in wall B for connection at a connector 14 to drain pipe D. Hole 12 in wall B is covered 'by a decorative escutcheon plate G received over drain pipe D.

Escutcheon plate G is molded in one-piece of synthetic plastic material such as acrylonitrilebutadienestyrene al- 4 though it will be appreciated that other types of thermoplastic material or even thermo setting material may be used.

Escutcheon plate G has an outer periphery 16 and an inner periphery defined by a centrally located circular hole 18. A wall 20 having a substantially uniform mate rial thickness of around 0.08" extends between outer periphery 16 and hole 18. Wall 20 defines front and rear surfaces of escutcheon plate G and these include first and second front surfaces 22 and 24, and first and second rear surfaces 26 and 28. In the preferred arrangement, surfaces 22 and 26 and surfaces 24 and 28, are parallel to one another. As will be apparent, first front surface 22 intersects hole 18 at an inner peripheral edge and first front surface 22 slopes rearwardly from this edge at an angle 30 of around 6. Second front surface 24 then slopes outwardly and rearwardly from first front surface 22 at an angle 32 of around 74 and intersects outer periphery 16 at an angle 34 of around 100".

In a preferred arrangement, front surfaces 22 and 24 are flat. That is, first front surface 22 is generated by a straight line rotating about the longitudinal axis of escutcheon plate G and sloping to the left in FIG. 5 at an angle of around 6. Second front surface 24 is generated by a straight line rotating about the longitudinal axis of escutcheon plate G and sloping to the left from the longitudinal axis in FIG. 5 at an angle of around As will be apparent, first and second front surfaces 22 and 24 intersect at an intersecting periphery 36. In one arrangement, the entire width of escutcheon plate G, as measured from outer periphery 16 to the entrance of hole 18 in first front surface 22, may be around 0.535". The distance from outer periphery 1-6 to intersecting periphery 36 is around 0.395", and the distance from the entrance of hole 18 in front surface 22 to intersecting periphery 36 is around 0.14. It will be understood that the dimensions and the size of hole 18 may vary and only one example of a certain arrangement for certain pipe sizes will be explained. In one arrangement, hole 18 has a diameter of 1.140" for use with pipe having an external diameter of 1.125".

Projecting rearwardly from first rear surface 26 of escutcheon plate G are a plurality of resilient fingers lI-I. Each finger H includes an outer surface 40 and first and second inner surfaces 42 and 44. In a preferred arrangement, first inner surfaces 42 of fingers H are simply continuations of the peripheral surface of hole 18 although they may slope inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of escutcheon plate G at a draft angle of around 3. As shown in FIG. 5, fingers H terminate in terminal ends 46. In one arrangement, fingers H may have a length as measured from first rear surface 26 to terminal ends 46 of around 0.455". This places the longitudinal midpoint of fingers H at around 0.227".

As shown in FIG. 5, second inner surfaces 44 of fingers H slope inwardly toward the longitudinal axis of escutcheon plate G from terminal ends 46. First and second inner surfaces 42 and 44 then intersect to define a gripping portion 50. Gripping portions 50 lie on the circumference of a circle having a diameter of around 1.100. Fingers [H may have a cross-sectional width thickness of around 0.06". Second inner surfaces 44 intersect terminal ends 46 of fingers H at the circumference of a circle having a diameter of around 1.135". Gripping portions 50 are positioned around 0.185" from end portions 46 so as to be displaced rearwardly of the midpoint of fingers H which is 0.22 from terminal ends 46.

In the preferred arrangement, inner surfaces 42 and 44 of fingers H intersect at a substantially sharp peak having substantially no longitudinal width. This allows some angular adjustment of plate G on a pipe. This is very useful in situations where a pipe extends through a wall at a slight deviation from being exactly perpendicular to the wall. As shown in FIG. 6, a pipe 56 having an outside diameter of 1.125 has a clearance of 0.015" in hole 18. However, pipe 56 is tightly gripped by gripping portions 50 while he on the circumference of a circle having a diameter of only 1.100". With this arrangement, plate G may be tilted so that outer periphery 16 does not exactly lie in a plane which is exactly perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of pipe 56. It will be recognized that if gripping portions 50 had a substantial longitudinal dimension it would not be possible to tilt plate G relative to pipe 56 and maintain itself in the tilted position. The amount of tilting provided for will depend, of course, upon the diameter of hole 18 as well as the diameter of the circle on which gripping portions 50- lie. In a preferred arrangement as described, it is possible to have a plate G retain itself in a tilted position on pipe 56 of up to around 6.

In one arrangement, terminal ends 46 of fingers H may lie substantially in the same plane as outer periphery 16. With this arrangement, if a plate G is lying on a floor and is stepped upon, fingers H provide added support to prevent breakage of wall 20.

The surfaces of fingers H have preferred relationships to one another as will be described in diagrammatic views of FIGS. 79. As shown in FIG. 7, a plane I defines the plane in which terminal ends 46 of fingers H lie. Outer surfaces 40 of fingers H intersect plane I at points 60 and 62 to define a plane disc K within the periphery of these intersection points. Plane disc K is coincidental with longitudinal axis L of escutcheon plate G. In the preferred arrangement, outer surfaces 40 intersect plane disc K at angles 64 of not less than 90. Preferably, angles 64 will be at least around 93.

As shown in FIG. 8, imaginary extensions of first inner surfaces 42 of fingers H intersect plane disc K at angles 66 of not less than 90. Preferably, angles 66 are at least around 93. As shown in FIG. 9, second inner surfaces 44 of fingers H intersect plane disc K at angles 68 of substantially less than 90. It will be understood that the steeper the slope of second inner surfaces 44, the easier it is to apply escutcheon plate G over the end of a pipe. In a preferred arrangement, angles 68 may be around 84 and are preferably always substantially greater than 45 so that the main force component caused by the edge of a pipe camming against surfaces 44 is acting outwardly.

Application of escutcheon plate G to a pipe may be described with reference to FIG. 6. Escutcheon plate G is held in a persons hand with outer periphery 16 and terminal ends 46 facing end 70 of pipe 56. Escutcheon plate G is then moved axially of pipe 56 to the left in FIG. 6 until end 70 strikes against second inner surfaces 44 of fingers H. Applying an axial force to the left in FIG. 6 on plate G then causes an outwardly reacting force on end 70 against sloping second inner surfaces 44 which bends fingers H outwardly to expand the diameter of the circle on which gripping portions 50 lie so that escutcheon plate G can he slid axially along pipe 56 to a position such as shown in FIG. 6. In this position, pipe 56 will be tightly gripped by gripping portions 50 of fingers H.

It will be understood that any number of fingers H may be provided, but in a preferred arrangement, the fingers have an arcuate cross-section and are five in number. By providing fingers H with a substantial arcuate dimension, it is possible to reduce the material thickness used for fingers H because the arcuate shape greatly increases the stiffness of the fingers. In addition, the substantial arcuate width of fingers H and gripping portions 50 securely grip around substantially the entire periphery of a pipe on which plate G is positioned. In the preferred arrangement, there are five fingers each of which extends over an arc of around 66 so that the spacing between adjacent fingers is around 6. By greatly increasing the number of fingers, such as by making over twenty fingers, they would have very little arcuate width and could be easily bent backwardly so that the gripping force they provide on a pipe would be greatly reduced over the gripping force provided with a small number of fingers.

It will be appreciated that by providing a second outer surface 24 on plate G of substantial length the strength of wall 20 is greatly improved while minimizing the material thickness. That is, if first front surface 22 curved smoothly all the way to outer periphery 16 it would be much easier to break wall 20. It will be understood that the angular relationships of the surfaces of fingers H is not only to provide draft clearance for removal from a mold but also to enhance the strength and performance of escutcheon plate G while minimizing the amount of material used. It will be recognized that fingers H extend rearwardly from first rear surface 26 of plate G adjacent hole 18 in such a manner that first inner surfaces 42 of fingers H are substantially flush with the peripheral surface of hole 18 and there are no cracks in plate G at the exterior of hole 18 as there is "when a metal plate is provided with slit and deformed fingers. In addition, it will be appreciated that plate G may be painted or provided with an electro-deposited coating of a metal such as chromium to provide a decorative appearance. An electrodeposited metal coating makes plate G look like a metal plate while retaining corrosion resistance and ease of manufacture.

In some installations, metal legs are provided for supporting a lavatory or vanity. Such supporting legs commonly have escutcheon plates applied over them at the floor to hide any screws or imperfections resulting from securement of the legs to the floor. Such supporting legs normally have a cross-sectional shape which is either circular, square or hexagonal. The finger dimensions and relationships previously described are especially important for securely gripping legs having such cross-sectional shapes. As shown in FIG. 10, a leg having a square cross-sectional shape has its corners lying on the periphery of a circle which is only slightly smaller in diameter than hole 18. With the fingers arrangement described, only one corner of leg 80 may be received in a space between adjacent fingers as shown in FIG. 10. Therefore, the fingers will still tightly grip the corner edges of leg 86.

FIG. 11 shows a leg 82 having a hexagonal cross-sectional shape. The corners of hexagonal leg 82 lie on the periphery of a circle having a diameter slightly smaller than the diameter of hole 18. With the arrangement of fingers described, only one corner of hexagonal leg 82 may be positioned in a space between adjacent fingers as shown in FIG. 11. Therefore, the other corners of hexagonal leg 82 are still tightly gripped by the fingers. Due to the substantially line contact between gripping portions 50 of fingers H and the corners of square leg 80 or hexagonal leg 82, slight tilting of plate G is still permitted to provide a good fit where a leg is not exactly perpendicular to a floor in the manner described !With reference to FIG. 6.

FIG. 12 shows a modified form of escutcheon plate M having a smooth and unbroken front surface 84. Front surface 84 may be curbed outwardly as shown in FIG. 13. Plate M includes a rear surface 86 and a circular peripheral portion 88. Plate M is molded in one-piece of synthetic plastic material as described with reference to escutcheon plate G of FIGS. 19. A plurality of fingers N are formed integrally with plate M and project rearwardly from rear surface 86 at positions spaced inwardly from peripheral portion 88. Fingers N include interior surfaces 90 extending substantially perpendicular to rear surface 86. Fingers N have outer surfaces defined by the first and second surfaces 92 and 94 respectively. Fingers N also terminate in terminal ends 96. First and second outer surfaces 92 and 94 intersect at a gripping portion 98 which projects radially outward from fingers N. Gripping portion 98 is substantially a sharp peak having substantially no :width axially of fingers N. In this manner, plate M may be tiltably adjusted when fixed in position in the same manner as described with reference to FIG. 6. Fingers N are arcuate in cross-section as shown in FIG. 14 so that surfaces 90, 92, 94 and gripping portions 98 define arcuate segments of circles. In one arrangement, plate M may include a central body portion defined within the periphery of fingers N which is not as thick as peripheral portion 88. A predetermined thickness of the central body portion may be adequate to provide sufiicient strength for plate -M. However, in some situations, plate M may be pried loose from its installed position by wedging a screw driver or other sharp tool behind peripheral portion 88 and prying plate M loose from its mounting position. Therefore, peripheral portion 88 may be made thicker than the central body portion so that peripheral portion 88 will not break and plate M may be reused :when it is pried from a mounting position.

FIG. 15 shows a wall P having a hole 102 through which pipe R extends. As originally installed, pipe R may have extended to a lavatory in the manner described with reference to FIG. 1. Hole 102 in wall P would then be covered by a plate as described with reference to FIGS. 1-9. In remodeling or the like, pipe R may have been taken out of use and a lavatory installed at a different location. Pipe R is then cut off at a point spaced slightly outwardly from wall P. Instead of going to the trouble of filling in the opening, plate M may be installed to provide a decorative covering which hides hole 102. in wall P. The internal diameter of pipe R is slightly smaller than the diameter of gripping portions 98 on fingers N. Second surfaces 94 of fingers N slope so as to provide a camming action when forcing fingers .N inside of pipe R. This causes fingers N to flex inwardly until end 104 of pipe R strikes rear surface 86 of plate M or until the rear surface adjacent peripheral portion 88 strikes against the surface of wall P. Resilient fingers N provide a strong gripping force against the internal periphery of pipe R to securely hold plate M in position. The substantial line contact between gripping portions 98 of fingers N and the internal surface of pipe R allow some angular adjustment of plate M relative to pipe "R so that peripheral portion 88 will engage the surface of wall -P even though pipe R is not exactly perpendicular to wall P.

In the arrangement of FIGS. 1-2-14, it will be noted that second outer sloping surfaces 94 are curved. It will be understood that these surfaces could be plane in the same manner as surfaces 44 of plate G and it will also be recognized that surfaces 44 of plate G could be curved in the manner of surfaces 94. Plate M may be chrome plated to provide a highly decorative surface. It will be recognized that the diameter of peripheral portion 88 may be as large as desired. In addition, fingers N may be spaced inwardly of peripheral portion 88 any desired distance.

FIG. 16 shows the relationship of the surfaces of fingers N to a reference plane. In FIG. 16, S represents the longitudonal central axis of plate M. Terminal ends 96 of fingers N lie in a plane P which is substantially perpendicular to axis S. Terminal ends 96 intersect plane T as at points 112 and 1-14 around the periphery of a circle to define a plane disc W. The major portion of curved second surfaces 94 extending from gripping portions 98 toward plane T makes an angle 116 with plane disc W which is greater than 90 and less than 135. With this arrangement, a good camming action is provided to deform fingers N radially inward when installing plate M within a hole or other opening. In the preferred arrangement, inner surfaces 90 and first outer surfaces 92 of fingers N extend substantially perpendicular to plane T. In the arrangement shown, ten fingers N are provided and fingers N have an arcuate width which is greater than the spacing between adjacent fingers. In a preferred arrangement, it has been found that an arcuate width for fingers ,N of around two times the width of the space between adjacent fingers provides most desirable resiliency and gripping action for fingers N.

Instead of installing plate M within a pipe as shown with reference to FIG. 15, it will be recognized that plate M may be installed directly in hole 102 in wall P and may be installed in other types of openings as well. With these arrangements, a number of different size plates M may be provided wherein fingers N lie on the periphery of different diameter circles so that the correct plate may be chosen to accurately and tightly fit within hole 102.

While the invention has been described with reference to a preferred embodiment, it is obvious that modifications and alterations will occur to others upon the reading and understanding of this specification.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. An escutcheon plate molded in one-piece of synthetic plastic material comprising:

(a) a body member having an outer periphery and a circular inner periphery, said inner periphery defining a centrally located substantially circular hole axially through said body member,

(b) said body member having a wall defined between said outer and inner peripheries,

(c) said wall having a front surface and a rear surface, said front surface of said wall intersecting said inner periphery at a peripheral edge, said outer periphery being positioned rearwardly of said peripheral edge a predetermined distance,

((1) said body member having a plurality of resilient fingers projecting rearwardly from said rear surface adjacent said peripheral edge,

(e) said fingers having terminal ends spaced rearwardly of said peripheral edge not greater than said predetermined distance and lying in a plane substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said hole,

(f) said fingers having outer surfaces and inner surfaces,

(g) said outer surfaces having terminal edges lying on the periphery of a cylinder intersecting said plane and defining a plane disc having its center coincidental with the longitudinal axis of said hole,

(h) said outer surfaces intersecting said plane disc at an angle not less than ninety degrees,

(i) said fingers having first and second inner surfaces,

(j) said first surfaces extending from said peripheral edge rearwardly of said rear surface,

(k) imaginary extensions of said first surfaces intersecting said plane disc at not less than ninety degrees,

(1) said second inner surfaces intersecting said plane disc at angles substantially less than ninety degrees,

(111) said first and second inner surfaces intersecting at positions defining gripping surfaces of said fingers,

(n) and said gripping surfaces lying on the periphery of a cylinder having a diameter less than the diameter of said hole.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein said second inner surfaces of said fingers intersect said plane disc at angles not less than forty-five degrees.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein said fingers have an axial finger length from said rear surface to said terminal ends, said finger length having a midpoint, said gripping portions of said fingers being positioned rearwardly of said midpoint.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein said outer periphery and said terminal ends of said fingers lie in substantially the same plane.

5. The device of claim 1 wherein said gripping portions of said fingers are curved and define arcuate segments of the circumference of a circle concentric with and smaller than said hole, said gripping portions being substantially sharp peaks projecting radially inward from said fingers and having substantially no axial fiat surfaces axially of said body member.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein said front surface of said body member includes first and second front surfaces, said first front surface extending outwardly from said inner periphery of said body member and intersecting said second front surface at an intersecting periphery, said second front surface extending rearwardly from said intersecting periphery to said outer periphery of said body member, said first front surface intersecting said inner 5 periphery being greater than the distance axially of said 10 body member from said inner peripheral edge to said intersecting periphery.

7. The device of claim 1 wherein there are five fingers, said fingers being equi-distantly spaced around said hole,

each of said fingers being arcuate in cross-section and ex- 15 tending over at least sixty degrees.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1944 OShaughnessy et al. 16-2 4/1952 Erb et a1. 16-2 10/1966 Noland 285-46 11/1967 Wilhelmi 16-2 2/ 1969 Politz 285-46 FOREIGN PATENTS 6/1938 France 16-2 DAVE W. AROLA, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3745594 *Jun 16, 1971Jul 17, 1973Cosper Mfg Co IncShower floor drain
US3823964 *Jan 5, 1973Jul 16, 1974Young SEscutcheon with positioning means
US3881752 *Sep 24, 1973May 6, 1975Fujishima George SFlange
US4385777 *Jun 2, 1980May 31, 1983The Logsdon FoundationDecorative escutcheon capable of inhibiting the propagation of noise
US5447338 *Apr 22, 1994Sep 5, 1995Senju Sprinkler Company LimitedEscutcheon for use with sprinkler head
US5482329 *May 21, 1993Jan 9, 1996Mccall; Delmar L.Pipe adaptor and installing device
US6419276 *Nov 23, 1999Jul 16, 2002Hansa Metallwerke AgCovering rosette
US7197777 *Jul 15, 2004Apr 3, 2007Sioux Chief Mfg. Co., Inc.Collar for a water pipe supply
US20110186148 *Feb 1, 2010Aug 4, 2011Dvorak Steven GEscutcheon
Classifications
U.S. Classification285/46, 138/89
International ClassificationF16L5/00, F16L55/11, F16L55/10
Cooperative ClassificationF16L5/00, E03C1/182, F16L55/11
European ClassificationE03C1/182, F16L5/00, F16L55/11