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Publication numberUS3615273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1971
Filing dateSep 12, 1969
Priority dateSep 13, 1968
Also published asDE1946656A1
Publication numberUS 3615273 A, US 3615273A, US-A-3615273, US3615273 A, US3615273A
InventorsSee Jacques Leon Alexandre
Original AssigneeRador Sa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strip for obtaining a barbed element
US 3615273 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [54] STRIP FOR OBTAINING A BARBED ELEMENT 6 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl 29/190 [51] Int. Cl B21c 37/02 [50] Field of Search 29/190 Primary Examiner-Winston A. Douglas Assistant Examiner-O. F. Crutchfield Attorneylmirie and Smiley ABSTRACT: Strip for obtaining a barbed member in which are made lateral cuts each consisting of an oblique first cut emerging on the lateral edge, a second cut, parallel to said lateral edge and communicating with the end of said first cut, and a third cut extending from the free end of this second cut to the vicinity of the longitudinal axis of the strip, said lateral cuts being combined with median cuts extending between two successive sets of lateral cuts, said median cuts each having a longitudinal portion from whose ends there extend two portions of cuts limiting appreciably triangular parts.

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\TAcquEs STRIP FOR OBTAINING A BARBED ELEMENT The present invention relates to a new strip for obtaining a barbed member.

According to the invention, the strip for obtaining a barbed member made by pulling on the strip itselfis characterized in that, at regular intervals, and starting from the two lateral edges of the strip, are made lateral cuts each consisting of an oblique fu'st cut emerging on the lateral edge, a second cut appreciably parallel to said lateral edge and communicating with the end of said first cut, and a third cut extending from the free end of this second cut to the vicinity of the longitudinal axis of the strip, said lateral cuts being combined with median cuts extending between two successive sets of lateral cuts, said median cuts each having a longitudinal portion from whose ends there extend two portions of cuts limiting appreciably triangular parts, the successive lateral cuts and median cuts making full zones in the strip appreciably extending according to two sine curves whose alternations are opposed, so that at least the tops of said sine curves are deformed by twisting, when the strip is stretched out whereby resulting that the zones extending between the various cuts, both lateral and median, are made to project in different planes.

Various other characteristics of the invention will moreover by revealed by the detailed description which follows.

Embodiments of the invention are shown, by way of nonrestrictive examples, in the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is an elevation of a strip for obtaining the barbed member of the invention in its closed position.

FIG. la is a similar elevation to FIG. 1, showing a modification.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a section of the member of FIG. during its extension.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view still showing the same member, completely opened out.

The barbed member of the invention is made from a continuous strip designated on the whole by I and of which only one segment appears in the drawing. The strip 1 has several distinct sets of cuts symmetrically shaped in relation to the two lateral edges 2 and 3 of the strip and these sets of cuts are symmetrically repeated right along the strip.

By looking at the cuts made from the edge 2 one sees that the first set has an oblique cut 4 emerging on the edge 2, a second cut 5 appreciably parallel to said edge 2 and intercepting the end of the cut 4, said cut 5 being shorter than the cut 4, and a cut 6 approximately perpendicular to the edge 2 and extending from the end of the cut 5 opposite to that which intercepts the cut 4 up to a certain distance from the longitudinal median axis of the strip 1.

Starting from the edge 3, the same cuts 4a, 5a, 6a are made in a strictly symmetrical manner in relation to the longitudinal axis of the strip 1. The same cuts as those described above are reproduced at regularly spaced-out intervals as shown at 4,, 5,, 6,, on the one hand, and 4a,, 5a, and 6a,, on the other.

In that which follows, the sets of cuts that have just been described are called comprehensively, sets of lateral cuts, as opposed to another set of cuts which will now be described, and which are called sets of median cuts. This second set of cuts comprises a longitudinal section 7 made along the axis of the strip and whose ends communicate with two oblique cuts 7a, 7b which themselves communicate with two cuts 8a, 8b aligned with each other and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the strip.

Without yet taking into account other cuts which are shown in the drawing and which are described in that which follows, one can forthwith ascertain from the foregoing description that the successive sets of lateral cuts and the sets of median cuts make two continuous parts of material in the strip 1, these two parts appreciably having the shape of two sine curves A and B indicated by dotted lines and whose alternations are opposed to each other, said alternations being, moreover, of same amplitude, same height and symmetrical in relation to the longitudinal axis of the strip. Consequently, one sees at once that the strip 1 can be deformed by pulling, which has the effect of increasing the amplitude of the two sine curves A and B while reducing the height of their alternations.

In addition to this first result, i.e., the possibility of lengthening the strip by a pull exerted in the direction shown by the arrow f, and taking into account that the strip 1 is made of thin material, one immediately perceives that the material of the strip extending according to the two sine curves A and B does not have the same mechanical strength all along said sine curves, and also, the method of working the material of the strip is not the same along said sine curves. Actually, the tops of these sine curves, for instance, the zones A,, B,, C,, are subjected to twisting stresses, whereas the intermediate parts are essentially subjected to pulling stresses. This means that the lengthening to which the strip is subjected does not take place by maintaining all the parts of said strip in the initial plane, but on the contrary, the twisting stresses which are applied to the zones A,, B,, C, mean that, as the strip is lengthened, these zones progressively tend to assume a greater and greater obliquity in relation to the plane initially defined by the strip. This leads to an expansion in the three dimensions of the various parts of the strip; actually the strip being made of a thin material was initially similar to a two-dimensional body, if we leave out the thickness of said strip.

On looking again at FIG. 1, one sees that the sets of median cuts comprise a supplementary cut 9a, 9b which, with the cuts 8a, 8b limits triangular spikes l0 and 11 connected to triangular spikes 12 and 13 opposed to one another and limited between the cuts 7, 7a, on the one hand, and 7, 7b, on the other.

The sets of lateral cuts also comprise a supplementary cut 14, 14a communicating with the free end of the cuts 6, 60 so that one limits two triangular spikes 15, 15a facing each other and which are connected to lateral zones of lozenge-shape designated by the reference numerals l6 and 160, which lateral zones are limited by the edges 2 and 3 respectively and by the cuts 4, 4,, 4

Cuts 17 and 17a of fishhook shape are made from the end of the cuts 6, 6a nearest to the longitudinal axis of the strip in order to limit hooks 18, 18a facing each other, against said cut 6 In the embodiment of FIG. I, the hooks I8 and 18a are strictly symmetrical in relation to the longitudinal axis of the strip 1, whereas according to the alternative embodiment of FIG. 1a, the hooks, then designated by the reference numerals 28, 28a, although directed towards each other, have their respective direction opposite one another, to facilitate their engaging, as will be seen in what follows.

Both in FIGS. la as in 2 and 3, the various cuts described with reference to FIG. I no longer have references, so as the better to show the solid parts left free by these cuts and the respective position which they are made to occupy progressively as the strip is lengthened.

FIG. 2 shows the strip when it begins to be opened out and that the lozenge-shaped zones 16, 16a are separated from each other progressively as the amplitude of the sine curves A and B increases. In addition to this separating, the zones 16 and 16a pivot in relation to the initial plane of the strip because the parts A,, B, and C, of the above-mentioned sine curves are subjected to a twist, due to the lengthening of the strip. Seeing that the amplitude of the sine curves A and B increases, the height of their alternations decreases, and consequently, the hooks I8 and 18a of FIG. 1, or 28, 28a of FIG. 1a and FIGS. 2 and 3 are brought closer together. The base of hooks being supported by the zones 16 and 16a which are subjected to a pivoting movement during opening out, it follows that said hooks progressively pivot as they come closer together.

When the strip has undergone a sufficient opening out, as shown in FIG. 3, then the books not only come into contact with one another, but also, they are engaged by their respective barbs, so that they make bolts for the opened-out member which has been lengthened while preventing this member from resuming its initial position if one ceases to exert a pull on it, even when the twisting deformation undergone by the parts A,, B, and C, is only a deformation within the elastic limit of the material of which the strip is made of steel for making a barbed member to be used for defensive purposes.

FIGS. 2 and 3 show that the zones 16 and 16a are not the only ones pivoting in relation to the initial plane of the strip. Actually, the triangular parts l0, 12, on the one hand, and 1 l, 13, on the other, which are limited by the sets of median cuts, have their bases contiguous to the parts C, subjected to a twisting deformation, so that these triangular parts also project at this moment in different directions while forming sharp-pointed members. This also applies to the triangular shaped parts which are joined in the vicinity of their bases to the parts A B of the sine curves, and consequently, said triangular parts 15 and 15a also project in other directions for also making sharp-pointed members.

The form of the hooks 28, 28a of FIG. la is generally considered more advantageous than that of the hooks 18, 18a of FIG. 1, because the mutual engaging of said hooks 28, 28a takes place spontaneously at the moment when the strip is extended, whereas in the embodiment of FIG. 1, it is advisable in order that this mutual engaging takes place without fail, to impart a certain twist to said hooks at the same time that the cuts are made. This operation can nevertheless be useful when the barbed member is to be used for military defence, for then its efficacity is increased by providing, as shown in FIG. 1a beginnings of cuts 19 in the zones 16 and in the triangular parts l0, l1, l2 and 13, other beginnings of cuts 20, 21 22, 23, at the same time that a certain initial deformation is imparted, so that these beginnings of cuts are like the teeth of a jaggedset toothed saw.

On the other hand, when the barbed member is intended for civilian purposes, for fencing a round animals or the like, for instance, then, of course, the various projectings parts will, on the contrary, preferably be founded so as to avoid all risk of in ury.

It should be noted that the member described in the foregoing can be made from strips of very variable widths. When it is required to obtain a barbed member for use for the same purposes as ordinary barbed wire, then the strip is made of a ribbon a few centimeters wide, for instance, a strip with a width comprised between one and five centimeters. The barbed member of the invention can nevertheless be put into operation for producing much larger members, for making portable wire entanglements. In this case, the strips used can be steel strips several tenths of centimeters wide. The extension of said members is effected on the spot where they are to be used. In the case of narrow members, extension can be easily effected and without danger by simply pulling by hand, whereas in the case of very wide members, for forming barriers or barbed wire entanglements, opening out is done by mechanical means, for instance, by a pull exerted by a vehicle after one end of the strip has been fixed. Seeing that the extending of the barbed member described in he foregoing is done on the spot where it is to be used, this member can easily be taken to the spot in coil form, by which there is no danger seeing that no projecting parts are opened out.

I claim:

1. Strip for obtaining a barbed member made by pulling on the strip itself, in which, at regular intervals, and starting from the two lateral edges of the strip, are made lateral cuts each consisting of an oblique first cut emerging on the lateral edge, a second cut, appreciably parallel to said lateral edge and communicating with the end of said first cut, and a third cut extending from the free end of this second cut to the vicinity of the longitudinal axis of the strip, said lateral cuts being combined with median cuts extending between two successive sets of lateral cuts, said median cuts, each having a longitudinal portion from whose ends there extend two portions of cuts limiting appreciably triangular parts, the successive lateral cuts and median cuts making full zones in the strip appreciable extending according to two sine curves whose alternations are opposed, so that at least the tops of said sine curves are deformed by twisting when the strip is stretched out whereby resulting that the zones extending between the various cuts, both lateral and median, are made to project in different 2. Strip according to claim 1, characterized in that supplementary cuts of fishhook shape are made near to the third cut of each set of lateral cuts for limiting two hooks opposite to each other which are made to coincide with one another when the strip is extended, so that said hooks keep said strip in an opened-out state for which the zones limited by the various cuts project in different planes.

3. Strip according to claim 2, characterized in that the hooks are made symmetrically in relation to the longitudinal axis of the strip and in that they are subjected to twisting so that they fit into each other.

4. Strip according to claim 2, characterized in that the hooks are made to face each other but in opposite directions.

5. Strip according to claim 1, characterized in that beginnings of cuts are made in the various parts limited by the cuts and in that the parts contiguous to said beginnings of cuts are bent like a jagged-set tooth saw.

6. Strip according to claim 1, characterized in that the strip is made of resilient metal sheeting.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US77905 *May 12, 1868 Galen ore
US2712768 *Jul 11, 1950Jul 12, 1955Bocjl CorpFastener strip and method of making same
US3116120 *Aug 18, 1960Dec 31, 1963Koskinen Onni SMetallic mesh material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4262059 *May 22, 1978Apr 14, 1981Frankowski Leo AMethod for making a thin-walled object
US4887796 *Nov 30, 1987Dec 19, 1989American Fence CompanyBarbed tape
US4997721 *Jul 18, 1990Mar 5, 1991Cat Claw, Inc.Method of making a bird repellant structure and blank for use therein
US20100043313 *Aug 21, 2009Feb 25, 2010Anthony Melvyn GrayDevice for deterring resting on a surface
EP0615000A1Feb 22, 1994Sep 14, 1994Dow Corning CorporationCoatings using filled hydrogen silsequioxane
EP0770652A2Oct 24, 1996May 2, 1997Dow Corning CorporationTamper-proof electronic coatings
EP0778612A2Dec 3, 1996Jun 11, 1997Dow Corning CorporationMethod of curing hydrogen silsesquioxane resin by electron beam to convert it to a silica containing ceramic coating
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/575, 256/2, 75/249, 428/596
International ClassificationB21F25/00, B21D31/00, F41H11/00, F41H11/08, B21D31/04
Cooperative ClassificationB21F25/00, B21D31/04, F41H11/08
European ClassificationB21D31/04, F41H11/08, B21F25/00