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Publication numberUS3616134 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 26, 1971
Filing dateApr 1, 1969
Priority dateApr 1, 1969
Publication numberUS 3616134 A, US 3616134A, US-A-3616134, US3616134 A, US3616134A
InventorsPalenske Carlton L
Original AssigneePalenske Carlton L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable bathmat material
US 3616134 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

r n L- Pfllenske 2,660,757 12/1953 Smith et Kimberly-Clark p" h, Wis. 2,830,297 4/1958 Sabee 54956 3,484,330 12/1969 Sokolowski et al. 25:3 i i Primary Examiner-Robert F. Burnett Patented s 1971 Assistant Examiner-Linda C. Koeckert Attorney-Wolfe, Hubbard, Leydig, Voit & Osann 13 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

161/129, 151/143 ABSTRACT: A disposable laminated bathmat having a cen- [51] B321) 5/12 1 layer f absorbent cellulosic wadding, with a layer of 161/5740 plastic film laminated to one side of the wadding as a water 128-129, 152, 156, 157, 148; 4/185; 1 6/2 barrier, a layer of nonwoven fabric bonded to the other side of the central layer to provide strength and abrasion resistance, References Cited and a layer to provide strength and abrasion resistance, and a UNITED STATES PATENTS layer of cellulosic tissue bonded to the other side of the non- 8/1941 Nicholson 4/185 woven fabric.

United States Patent [72] Inventor [54] DISPOSABLE BATl-lMAT MATERIAL [50] lFieldoiSearch...........................................

DISPOSABLE BATIIMAT MATERIAL DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates. generallytto bathmats and, more particularly, to an improved disposable laminated bathmat.

It is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved disposable bathmat having superior strength, abrasion resistance, bulk, and absorbency. A related objectof the invention is to provide such an improved disposable bathmat which has a desirable feel combined with a relativelyhigh absorbency rate and capacity.

Another object of the invention is to provide such an improved disposable bathmat which is nonabsorbent on the underside thereof.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved disposable bathmat of the type described above which can be efficiently manufactured at high production rates and at at FIG. 2 is a schematic side elevation of the bathmat shown in 1 FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale; and

FIG. 3 is. a schematic representation of a process for producing the bathmat shown in FIGS. I and 2 in accordance with the invention.

While the invention is susceptible of various modifications, and alternative forms, certain specific embodiments thereof" have been shown by way of example in the drawings which will. be described in detail herein. It should be understood, however, that it is not intendedto limit the invention to the. particular forms disclosed but, on the, contrary, the intention isto.

cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Referring now more. particularly to the accompanying. drawings, the invention is embodied in a bathmat represented. in FIGS. 1 and 2, and including a central layer of absorbent material formed of a multiplicity of plies 11 ofcreped cellulosic wadding, a layer 12 of scrim-tissue laminate on one face of the.central layer 10, and a plastic film 13 on the opposite face of the central layer 10. The tissue portion of the scrim-tissue laminate 12 in the illustrative embodiment comprises two plies 22 of cellulosic tissue bonded to the inner side of the. scrim l4, and two plies 230i the same tissue bondedtothe outer surface of the scrim 14. The two plies of tissueon each side of the scrim are preferably bonded to at least one of the two sets of threads in the scrim 14; for example, this may be accomplished by applying adhesive to the warp threads of the scrim 14 during the fabrication of the scrim-tissue laminate 12.

As can be seen in Figs. 1 and 2, the "scrim" portion of the scrim-tissue laminate 12 is a nonwoven fabric 14 comprising a set of spaced warp threads'20 which extend in the longitudinal or machine direction, and aset of fill threads 21 which extend across the warp threads in the transverse direction. Since fabric is nonwoven, the fill threads 21 are all on the same side of the warp threads 20, with the twosets of threads disposed in face-to-face relation to each other and adhesively bonded desired, as long as one set of threads is disposed entirely on one side of the other set. It will be understood that the term threads" is intended to include both monofilament and multifilament structures, although multilfilament structures are generally preferred in nonwoven fabrics. One particularly preferred scrim material for use in thepresent invention has a thread count of 3 2.5 (number of warp threads per inch by number of fill threads per inch), and the threads are made of 70 denier high tenacity nylon.

The cellulosic-tissue portion of the scrim-tissue laminate 12 suitably comprises cellulosic sheets having a drier basis weight of from about 7.4 to about 8.0 lbs. per 2,880 sq. ft., a finished basis weight offrom about 9 to about I 1 lbs. per 2880 sq. ft., a stretch per ply of from about 18 percent to about 25 percent, a dry cross direction strength of at least about 300 grams, and a wet cross direction strength of at leastabout grams. One typical cellulosic tissue that is particularlysuitable for use as the tissue plies 22 and 23 has a drier basis weight of 7.6 lbs. per 2880 sq. ft., a finished basis weight for two plies of 9.5 lbs. per sq. ft., a dry cross direction strength of 700 to 750 grams, a wet cross direction strength of to grams, and a stretch of 18 percent to 25 percent.

In order to provide a bathmat with superior absorbency characteristics, the multiply wadding layer 111 in the illustrative embodiment comprisesfour plies 11 of creped cellulosic wadding. Thewadding 111 is preferably embossable, and for this reason should have, a crepe ratioof at least 2:l.. The preferred wadding also has a dry basis weight, stretch, machine direction strength, and built within the same ranges mentioned previously for the cellulosic tissue plies.22 and 23 in the scrim-tissue laminate 1 1. One typical wadding that is particularlysuitable for use in the present invention has a drier basis weight of 4.8 lbs/2880 sq. ft., a crepe ratio of 220, a 120 percent stretch, a machine direction strength of 500-700 grams, and a bulk of 27-35, mils/l0 plies. For purposes of clarity, the term "tissue is used herein to identify the cellulosic sheets that are included in the preformedscrim issue laminate, l2, and the term wadding" is used herein to identify the multiple plies. 11 of cellulosic material disposed between the laminate 12 and the film 13. However, as will be understood .by those familiar with this art, the terms tissue" and wadding" are often used interchangeably, and thus the tissue sheets 22 and;23 may be the same material as the wedding plies 11 in certain cases.

The plastic film 13 must be water impervious, and is preferably a cold embossable film so that the multiple plies 11 of cellulosic wadding and the plastic him 13 may be interbonded in a single cold embossing operation, as will be describedin more detail below. in the particular example illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the four-wadding plies 11 and the film 13 are interbonded by a whipcordT embossing pattern. which forms a series of evenly spacedlongitudinal grooves in the embossed material. Of course, various other embossing patterns may be utilized,,if. desired, to achieve substantially the same result.

To bond the scrim-tissue laminate 12 to the multiply wadding, 10, a discontinuous adhesive pattem 241 is applied to the inner-surface ofthe tissue layers 22 before the scrim-tissue laminate is laminated to the embossed laminate ofwadding 10 and film 13. In the particular embodiment illustrated in FIG. I, the adhesive pattern 2 1 is a dot pattern printed on the inner surface of the tissue layers 22 by means of an intaglio cellroll. As will be apparent to those skilled in this art, such a discontinuous adhesive pattern firmly bonds the tissue 12 to the wadding 10 without adversely affecting the absorbency and flexibility thereof,

It has been found that the particular combination of materials embodiedsin the composite laminate of FIGS. 1 and 2 is superbly suited for use as a disposable bathmat. Thus, the central layer 10. of, cellulosic wadding, plus the two-tissuelayers 22 bonded to theinner surfaceof the scrim, provide a relatively high absorbent capacity, and the absorbent material. is readily accessible via the relatively large openings in the scrim l4 and the two tissue layers 23 bonded to the outer surface thereof so that the absorbency rate is also relatively high. Moreover, the scrim layer close to the top surface of the mat provides the composite laminate with the requisite tensile strength and abrasion resistance for a bathmat, and yet it is sufficiently economical for a disposable material. From a costperformance standpoint, a scrim made of 70 denier high tenacity nylon with a thread count of 3X2.5 is especially preferred. Finally, the two layers of cellulosic tissue on the outer surface of the scrim provide the composite bathmat with a printable surface and relatively soft feel and appearance, and enhance the absorbency of the mat by providing a wicking action on any wet surface brought into contact with the top surface of the mat. It has also been found that the relatively small pore structure of the central layer of cellulosic wadding retains absorbed water or other liquids under compression.

In FIG. 3, there is illustrated a preferred method of forming the particular bathmat shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Thus, four continuous webs of cellulosic wadding are unwound from rolls 30, 31, 32, and 33 and laminated to the underside ofa continuous web of cold embossable plastic film 13 unwound from a roll 34. To interbond the wadding from the rolls 30-33 and the film from the roll 34, the film 13 and the four webs of wadding are passed over a guide roll 35 and into the nip of an embossing roll 36 and a cooperating calender roll 37, with the embossing roll bearing against the film side of the laminate. In the particular produce illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the cellulosic wadding 10 and plastic film 13 are embossed with a whipcord pattern, but as mentioned previously, a number of different embossingpatterns may be utilized in carrying out the present invention. When using the exemplary materials described above and 0.5-mil polyethylene cold embossable" film (available from Extrudo Film Inc.) a suitable embossing pressure is 200 to 550 p.s.i.g.

As the embossed wadding film laminate is withdrawn from the nip of the rolls 36, 37 it is laminated to a preformed scrimtissue laminate 12 unwound from a roll 38. As the scrim-tissue laminate is unwound from the roll 38, it is passed through an adhesive application station 40 comprising a pair of guide rolls 41 and 42 and an adhesive applicator roll 43. The adhesive is normally applied in a discontinuous pattern, such as that indicated by the adhesive areas 24 in FIG. 1, so that the subsequent bonding of the scrim-tissue laminate to the waddingfilm laminate is achieved with a minimum of adhesive and without reducing the flexibility or absorbency of the resulting laminate. Of course, the particular adhesive employed should be insoluble in water, which is the primary liquid that is absorbed by bathmats during use.

From the adhesive application station 40, the scrim-tissue laminate is passed over a guide roll 44 and laminated to the wadding side of the film-wadding laminate, thereby adhesively bonding the cellulosic tissue on one side of the scrim-tissue laminate 12 to the multiply wadding 10 in the film-wadding laminate withdrawn from the nip of the rolls 36 and 37. The resulting adhesively bonded laminate is then wound on a roll 45 for subsequent slitting or cutting into bathmats of the desired size and shape.

In a working example of the invention, a number of bathmats were prepared by the process illustrated in FIG. 3, and using the exemplary materials identified above. These bathmats were subjected to a number of different tests, with the following results:

Absorbent capacity 7.9 8 Bulk l0lifts at 3.5"/sq.ft. Loading 0.461" Fire rateAATCC-33 1 sec. Did no 8.0 No. times dry wt.

Passes 1 second flame impingement 12.7 seconds 14.7 seconds Fire rateNFPA-702 MD 12. Fire rateNFPA-702 CD 14.

In the absorbency rate test, 0.1 cc. of water was deposited on the upper surface of the bathmat, and the time required for the water to be absorbed completely into the mat was measured. In the absorbent capacity test, a 4-inch X4-inch sample of the bathmat material was weighed in its dry condition and then submerged in water for 3 minutes, removed and hung by one corner for 1 minute, and weighed again; as shown in the above table, the wet weight was found to be about eight times the dry weight.

As can be seen from the foregoing detailed description and examples, the present invention provides an improved disposable bathmat having superior strength, abrasion resistance, bulk, and absorbency. More particularly, although the bathmat is disposable, it has a desirable feel combined with a relatively high absorbency rate and capacity. Furthermore, the bathmat is nonabsorbent on the underside thereof. Moreover, the bathmat can be efficiently manufactured at high production rates and at a relatively low cost.

I claim as my invention:

1. A disposable laminated bathmat comprising the combination of a central layer of absorbent material formed of a multiplicity of plies of cellulosic wadding, a layer of nonwoven fabric comprised of a plurality of spaced apart, substantially parallel warp threads and a plurality of spaced apart fill threads extending across the warp threads in a transverse direction, said warp threads being bonded to said fill threads, said layer of nonwoven fabric being bonded to one side of said central layer and being adapted to strengthen said bathmat, a layer of water impervious plastic film bonded to the other side of said central layer and a layer of absorbent cellulosic tissue bonded to the other side of said nonwoven fabric.

2. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric is adhesively bonded to at least one ply of cellulosic tissue on the inner surface thereof, and said cellulosic tissue is adhesively bonded to adjacent plies of cellulosic wadding in said central layer.

3. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said multiple piles of cellulosic wadding in said central layer and said plastic film are interbonded by embossing.

4. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said central layer of cellulosic wadding has a Crepe ratio of at least about 2: l.

5. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 4 wherein said cellulosic wadding in said central layer has a drier basis weight of from about 4.0 to about 5.8 lbs. per 2880 sq. ft., a stretch per ply of from about 70 percent to about 120 percent, a bulk offrom about 25 to about 40 mils/l 0 plies, and a machine direction strength of from about 400 to about 800 grams.

6. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said plastic film is cold embossable polyethylene.

7. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric has a thread count of between about 2 and about 3 threads per inch in both directions.

8. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 1 wherein said nonwoven fabric is made of nylon threads.

9. A disposable laminated bathmat comprising the combination of a central layer of absorbent material formed of a multiplicity of plies of cellulosic wadding, a laminate of scrim and cellulosic tissue adhesively bonded to one side of said central layer of absorbent material, said scrim having a plurality of warp and fill threads crossing one another, and a layer of plastic film laminated to the other side of said central layer of absorbent material.

10. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 9 wherein said multiple plies of cellulosic wadding in said central layer and said plastic film are interbonded by embossing.

11. A disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 9 wherein said cellulosic tissue in said laminate of scrim and cellulosic tissue has a drier basis weight of from 7.4 to about 8.0 lbs. per 2880 sq. ft., a finished basis weight of from about 9 to about 1 1 lbs. per 2880 sq. ft., a stretch per ply of from about 18 percent to about 25 percent, a dry cross direction strength of at least about 300 grams, and a wet cross direction strength of at least about grams.

material, said scrim-tissue laminate including a plurality of parallel spaced apart warp threads and a plurality of spaced apart fill threads crossing said warp threads.

13. A method of forming a disposable laminated bathmat as set forth in claim 12 wherein said scrim-tissue laminate is adhesively bonded to said layer of absorbent material.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4073998 *Jan 24, 1977Feb 14, 1978Bay Mills LimitedScrim/foil laminate
US4644592 *Mar 25, 1986Feb 24, 1987Small John DDisposable floor mat
US6935382 *Jul 24, 2003Aug 30, 2005Christine BuckleyExercise rug with contours
US8631833Dec 20, 2011Jan 21, 2014Silver Plume, LLCYoga towel
EP0525291A1 *Mar 10, 1992Feb 3, 1993Firma Carl FreudenbergLaminate of non-woven fabrics of high specific volume and having high strength
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/110, 428/154, 156/209, 428/201, 442/57, 428/342, 428/198, 4/581, 428/215
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/02, D04H5/04, D04H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04H5/04, A47G27/0225
European ClassificationD04H5/04, A47G27/02Q4