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Publication numberUS3616848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1971
Filing dateMar 28, 1967
Priority dateApr 1, 1966
Also published asDE1501628A1, DE1501628B2, DE1501634A1, DE1501634B2
Publication numberUS 3616848 A, US 3616848A, US-A-3616848, US3616848 A, US3616848A
InventorsKaelin Werner
Original AssigneeSulzer Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Support means for heat transfer device
US 3616848 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 72] Inventor Werner Kaelin La Jolla, Calif.

211 App]. No. 626,453

[22] Filed Mar. 28, 1967 Patented Nov. 2, 1971 [73] Assignee Sulzer Brothers, Limited Winterthur, Switzerland [32] Priority Apr. 1, 1966 [33] Switzerland [54] SUPPORT MEANS FOR HEAT TRANSFER DEVICE 18 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 165/67, 165/162,165/178 [51] Int. Cl F281 9/00 Field of Search 165/162,

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 1,488,188 3/1924 An derberg 122/250 X 1,901,090" 371 933 Eule et al 1 /1 72)? 2,162,152 6/1939 Wulle /125 X 2,204,614 6/1940 Nelson et a1. 29/157.3 2,980,404 4/1961 Andersen et a1... 165/172 3,077,226 2/1963 Matheny 165/125 3,160,204 12/1964 Jones 165/144 X 3,274,755 9/1966 Montagnon 55/269 X 3,286,767 11/1966 Evans 165/163 X FOREIGN PATENTS 157,156 10/1939 Austria 165/172 914,083 12/1962 Great Britain.. 165/172 920,836 3/1963 Great Britain 165/163 146,399 8/1954 Sweden 165/172 520,071 4/1940 Great Britain Primary Examiner-Manuel A. Antonakas Attorney-Kenyon & Kenyon, Reilly Carr & Chapin ABSTRACT: The heat transfer system includes a plurality of wound tube coils fixed within the holes of at least three plates disposed in a radiating axial manner from the axis of the system. The tube coils are wound helically or spirally and are fixed at three points about the holes through which they pass.

PATENTEDNBV 2 Ian SHEET 10F 3 OOOnVOOQ QWD E 00%000660 WEQNEQ W W 2 1 JIA nw, w e T V T m MW PATENTEBunv 2 I9?! sum 2 OF 3 Inventor WERNEQ KAELIN 5y 7:7 W

fl TO NEVS PATENTED 2 3, 61 6 848 SHEET 3 OF 3 Inventor.-

\A/ERNEF? l (AELW fay 4% 1/ A TTOR 5V5 SUPPORT MEANS FOR HEAT TRANSFER DEVICE The invention relates to a heat transfer system or heat exchange device and a method of making the same. More particularly, the invention relates to a heat transfer assembly including a cluster of at least one helically or spirally wound tube.

Heretofore, heat transfer systems of the above kind have had the tube coils fixed spatially by bands and screws. However, this construction as well as the methods for attaching such has been complicated and very time consuming and as a result has been expensive.

Briefly, this invention provides a heat transfer system having a cluster or plurality of tubes at least one of which is helically or spirally wound into a tube coil and a plurality of plates which mount the coils of the tube coils and which are disposed radially of the coils and axially of the tube cluster. The plates are provided with holes through which the coils of a tube coil pass and are provided with locking means for fixing the coils within the plates.

In one embodiment of the invention, a wedge is inserted at the locations where the coils pass through the plates between a pair of adjacent tube coils in wedging relation to the coils and rigidly connected, as by tack welding, to the adjacentiplate. Similar wedges are secured to each plate, between each pair of tube coils so that only one wedge on a plate is used for each pair of tube coils thereby reducing the number of wedges.

In another embodiment of the invention, the tube coilspass through wedge-shaped holes in the plates and contact with two spaced points around the hole. Also, a wedge is secured at one end to a plate and disposed in wedging relation to a tube coil passing through the holes of the plate. This effects a three- .point support for each tube passing through a plate while maintaining the initial stress between the wedge and tubepln the event that a tube coil should become loosened the play between the tube and any of the three points ofsupport is slight.

In another embodiment, each of two adjacent wedgeshaped holes are disposed with thebroad ends in facing relation and a wedge is wedged between the tube coils passing through these holes. This enables two adjacent tubes to be fixed by a single wedge so that each tube has a three-point support. This embodiment can be further modified by enlarging each pair of facing wedge-shaped holes so as to form a single slot and by wedging a single wedge between the pair of tube coils passing through the slot. This modification allows a reduction in weight of the plates without affecting the securement of the tube coils in the plates.

In still another embodiment the sides of the holes or slots which contact the tube coils are formed with outwardly bent flaps which are disposed out of the plate plane and bear resiliently on a tube coil to prevent loosening of the tubes. These flaps bear against the tube coil even during variations in temperature. Likewise, the wedges are formed with resilient flaps which extend transversely to the plane of the wedges to bear resiliently on the tube coils.

Preferably, the angle between the bearing surface of a wedge and the wedge side of the hole adjacent to the narrow end of the wedge is more than twice the angle of friction.

In still another embodiment, the relative positions of the plates are altered with respect to each other after insertion of the tube coils either by altering the angular positions of the plates or the axial positions through the use of the fixing means. In this embodiment, the whole tube cluster is fixed in the plates with one adjusting movement. Alternatively, the

relative positions of the tube coils can be altered after insertion in the plates to resiliently fix the tube coils in place. This is accomplished by positioning a bar axially of the tube coils in resilient engagement with the coils. Advantageously, the bar can have recesses into which each is fixed to the plates at their point ofintersection.

The method provided by the invention includes the steps of securing a plurality of spertured plates together to form a radiating plate structure, coiling at least one straight tube into a helical winding, and inserting the coiled portions of the tube through the apertures of the plates in a helical manner. A further method of the invention includes a simultaneous coiling and insertion through the apertures of the plates of the tube in a single operation.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a heat transfer system having tube coils. which are fixed in place in a single inexpensive manner.

It is another object of the invention to provide a wound tube coil in a plurality of radiating plates.

It is another object of the invention to support a tube coil in a plurality of plates with a three-point support in each plate.

It is another object of the invention to position a wound tube coil in a plurality of radiating plates in a resilient manner.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates an elevational view of a heat transfer system according to the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a plan view of the system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 illustrates a section through a means for fixing the tubes of a heat transfer system of the invention in place;

FIG. 4 illustrates a fragmentary section through a modified meansfor fixing the tubes in place;

FIG. 5 illustrates a bar which is sued in fixing tubes in place according to the invention;

FIG. 6 illustrates a fragmentary view of a heat transfer system using the bar of FIG. 5 to fix the tubes in place;

FIG. 7 schematically illustrates a method of making a heat transfer system according to the invention;

FIG. 8 schematically illustrates another method of making a heat transfer system according to the invention;

FIG. 9 illustrates an enlarged view of a pair of holes within a plate and a wedge wedging a pair of tubes into three-point contact according to the invention;

FIG. 10 illustrates a view taken on line A-B of FIG. ll of a modifiedheat transfer system of the invention;

FIG. 11 illustrates a view taken on line C-D of FlG.l0; and

FIG. 12 illustrates a view taken on line'E-F of FIG. 10.

Referringto FlGS. l and 2, heat transfer system 1 consists essentially of :pairs of tube coils 2, S of different radii and plates, for example, four plates 4, 5, 6, 7 which are disposed substantially at-right angles to each other to mount the tube coils. Theplates 4, 5, 6, 7 are welded together at the center of the heat transfer system I and radiate therefromaxially of the system.,Each plate 4,5, 6, 7 has a plurality of holes whichare of radii corresponding to the radii of the tube coils 2, 3 so as to permit passage of a tube coil with a relatively close fit. In addition, these holes are spaced in accordance with the coil intervals of the tube coils 2, 3. Wedges are secured to all the plates 4, 5, 6, 7 to wedge between the coils not only of the outer tube coil 2 but also the inner concentric tube coils 3 to fix the tube coils 2, 3 inthe plates. For example, wedges 9 are inserted between each pair of coils of tube coil 2 near to the locations of therpassageof the coils through the plate 4 and are secured, as by tack welds, to the plate 4 so as to fix the tube coil 2 in the plate 4. Similarly, wedges 8 are secured at one end to plate 7 and pass between the coils of the tube coil 2.

Referring to FIG. 3, instead of using wedges, the tube coils (only two of which are shown for clarity) pass through holes in the plate 7 as well as through a pair of aligned holes in a fork 40 which is slidably mounted over plate 7. The fork 40 has a threaded screw 42 which pass through the top into abutment with the top surface of plate 7 for moving-the fork 40 up and down relative to plate 7. The fork 40 and screw 42 are dimensioned so that when the screw 42 is threaded outwardly of the fork 40 so as to permit the fork 40 to rest directly on theplate 7, the holes in the fork 40 and the holes in the plate 7 are coincidental. The coils of the tube coils can then be passed through theseholes. However, when the screw 42 is threaded inwardly of the fork, the fork 40 moves upwardly of the plate 7 causing a misalignment of the respective holes. Thus, with the coils passing through the holes in the plate 7 and fork 40 and the screw being tightened to raise the fork, the walls of the holes in the fork and the wall of the hole in the plate bear against the coils to fix the tube coils in place. Similar fork-type fixing means are mounted on each plate over each vertical set of holes therein and each screw of a fork is screwed simultaneously into the fork when the coils of the tube coils are passing through the plates. Alternatively, a fork can be dimensioned to pass over a number of vertical sets of holes in the plates to grip and fix several radially juxtaposed coils.

Referring to FIG. 4, the plates instead of being fixed together at a common intersection point are constructed to pass one through the other. in such a case, a screw 11 is threaded into a threaded bore in a portion connecting the opposite plates 4, 6 to contact the upper surface of the connecting portion between the remaining plates 5, 7. Upon insertion of the tube coils in the aligned holes of the respective plates, the screw 11 is tightened to shift plates 4 and 6 angularly relative to the remaining plates 5 and 7 as well as axially so as to fix the tube coils within the holes of the plates 4, 5, 6, 7.

Referring to FIG. 5, another means for fixing the tube coils in the plates consists of a bar 15, which has recesses 16 along its length on two opposite sides. These recesses are adapted to the radii of the tubes of the tube coils, and the distance a between them corresponds to the tube coil intervals. The distance b between the recesses 16 is greater than the radial distance c between the tube coils 2 and 3. The tube coils are fixed by first inserting the bar between the coils 2 and 3, so that it is at right angles to the position shown in FIG. 6. When the bar 15 is situated at the correct height, it is turned 90 about its longitudinal axis, so that the recesses 16 bear on the tube coils 2 and 3. Because the distance b is greater than the distance c, the tube coils 2 and 3 are braced resiliently in a radial direction, and pressed firmly against the hole walls in the plates 6 and 7. The bar 15 is secured in the position shown in FIG. 6 by welding to it a crossbar 17, which is welded to the plates 6 and 7 at the point where these plates meet.

Referring to FIG. 7, one method of making a heat transfer system, for example, having a plurality of apertures plates 4, 5, 6, 7 (as described above) secured in a radiating manner from a displaceable cylindrical body 30 starts with the feeding of a straight tube 22 in the direction indicated by arrow 21 through a series of three rollers 20. As the tube 22 is shaped into a coil of constant diameter and constant coil interval by the rollers it is fed through the apertures in the respective plates 4, 5, 6, 7. Upon filling the innermost series of apertures in the plates, the next series of apertures is filled in the same manner; the distance between the rollers of the series of rollers 20 being adjusted in accordance with the different radius of curvature of the outer tube coil.

Referring to FIG. 8, where the tube coils are of a spiral configuration, a straight tube 25 is initially fed in the direction of arrow 24 through a roller system 26 positioned between adjacent apertures plates 4 and 7 to be bent into a curvature enabling it to pass through three consecutive plates 4, 5 and 6. Next, the curved tube is passed through a second roller system 27 positioned between plates 6 and 7 to be bent into a curvature enabling it to be passed through the following three plates 7, 4 and 5. Finally, the curved tube is passed through a roller system 28 positioned between plates 5 and 6 to be bent into a curvature enabling it to pass through plates 6, 7 and 4. This method enables a heat transfer system to be constructed with spiral tube coils which may either extend in a plane parallel to the plane of the drawings or lie on a conical surface.

Referring to FIG. 9, the plates of the system, for example, plate 4, is provided with holes 48 of wedge-shaped outline for the passage of the coils of the tube coils 2. Each pair of adjacent holes 48 are disposed with the broad ends of the wedge shape in facing relation. Each pair of holes 48 cooperates with a wedge 9 which is secured at its broad end, as by welding, to the plate 4 and is disposed between adjacent coils of pipe coil 2 to fix the coils to the plate 4. The wedge 9 is sized to press the coils through the wedge 49 toward and against the wedge sides of the holes 48 so that each coil is supported reliably at three points. The angle a between the wedge surface 49 and the wedge side of a hole 48 adjacent the narrow end of wedge 9 is larger than twice the angle of friction.

Referring to FIGS. 10 to 12, the means to fix the coils of tube coil 2 in the plates can also utilize slots 50 which have been formed from pairs of adjacent wedge-shaped holes which are interconnected through removal of the separating piece of the plate between them. In this case, each slot 50 has two pairs of flaps 51 bent from the plate 4 into the passage bounded by the slot and out of the plane of the plate 4 to resiliently bear against the two coils passing through the slot. Each pair of flaps 51 engage a single coil at two spaced points. A wedge 9 is disposed to extend over each slot 50 between the pairs of flaps 51 and coils and is secured as by a tack weld 53 to the plate 4 at one end. The wedge 9' has transversely extending flaps 52 along opposite sides which bear resiliently against the coils and cooperates with flaps 51 to support each coil at three points. This three-point support fixes the coils in the plate 4 in a manner to flexibly receive any heat expansion between the coils and plate 4. In addition, this resilient fixing means prevents the occurrence of pitting which is of particular advantage where the heat transfer systems are used in nuclear reactors since the wear resulting from pitting could jeopardize the operation of the reactor.

In use, a heat-conveying medium flows substantially axially around the cluster of tubes of the heat transfer systems of FIGS. 1, 2, 7 and 9 to 12 whereas, the medium flows substantially radially through the clusters of tubes of the systems of FIG. 8.

It is noted that the coils of the pipe coils which carry known heat transfer mediums can be fixed to the plates of the heat transfer systems of the invention by welding, for example, by tack welds. Further, the number of radiating plates used in accordance with the invention may include three or more plates and may be uniformly or nonuniformly spaced from each other around the circumference of the system.

Having thus described the invention, it is not intended that it be so limited as changes may be readily made therein without departing from the scope of the invention. Accordingly it is intended that the foregoing Abstract of the Disclosure, and the subject matter described above and shown in the drawings be interpreted as illustrated and not in a limiting sense.

What I claim is:

1. A heat transfer system comprising:

at least three one-piece plates disposed in a spaced radiating axial manner from the axis of the heat transfer system, each of said plates having a plurality of holes disposed therein;

a plurality of wound tube coils passing through the holes of said plates; and

means fixing said tube coils in said plates.

2. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 1 further comprising a cylindrical body disposed on the axis of the heat transfer system, Said plates being secured to said cylindrical body.

3. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim I wherein said means is mounted on one of said plates for moving another of said plates relative thereto whereby said tube coils are held in fixed relation therein.

4. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 3 wherein said means moves said plates angularly relative to each other.

5. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 3 wherein said means moves said plates axially relative to each other.

6. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said means alters the relative positions of said tube coils relative to each other to fix said tube coils in said plates.

7. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 6 wherein said means is a bar, said bar being positioned between radially adjacent tube coils axially of the heat transfer system, said bar having a dimension perpendicular to said adjacent tube coils greater than the initial spacing between said adjacent tube coils whereby said bar is braced against said adjacent tube coils upon alteration of the relative positions thereof.

8, A heat transfer system set forth in claim 7 wherein said bar has a plurality of recesses receiving said adjacent tube coils.

9. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 1 wherein said means is mounted on said plates.

10. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 9 wherein said means includes a plurality of wedges, each of said wedges being secured to a plate and being disposed in wedging relation between a pair of adjacent coils of said tube coils.

ll. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 10 wherein a tack weld secures said wedge to a plate.

12. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 1 wherein each said plate has a plurality of wedge-shaped holes receiving said tube coils, each said coil being in contact at two points with the walls of each hole.

13. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 12 wherein said means includes a wedge positioned between a pair of coils of a tube coil adjacent to a pair of wedge-shaped holes, said wedge having a wedge surface on each side thereon in contact with a coil whereby each coil is supported at three points.

14. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 13 wherein each pair of wedge-shaped holes have broad ends thereof in facing relation.

15. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 13 wherein said wedge surface and the wall of each wedge-shaped hole adjacent the narrow end of said wedge form an angle more than twice the angle of friction.

16. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 1 wherein each said plate has a plurality of slots receiving said tube coils and a pair of flaps extending into opposite ends of said slot forming wedge surfaces in resilient bearing contact with a coil, and said means includes a wedge disposed across each slot between the coils passing therethrough in contact with said coils.

17. A heat transfer system as set forth in claim 16 wherein each wedge has a pair of oppositely disposed transverse flaps, each flap resiliently bearing on a coil to form a three-point support with said pair of flaps.

18. In a heat exchange device an improved mounting arrangement for tubing, said improvement comprising, a plurality of plates having a plurality of substantially circular openings formed therein, an elongated annular member supporting the plates, said plates extending substantially radially of the member, and a plurality of helically coiled tubes each threadably mounted through some of the openings.

Patent No. 3,516,848 Dated November 2, 1971 Inventor(s) Werner Kaelin It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 68, before "tube" insert --tube cluster between radially adjacent-- Column 1, line 70, 71, delete "is. .intersection. and

insert --coil fits. The bar is secured in place by being welded to a. cross-bar which is fixed to the plates at their point of intersection.--

Column 2, line 26, sued" should be --used-- Column 3, line 75, after "wedge" insert --surfaces-- Signed (and sealed this 18th day of April 1972.

A t be st:

EDWARD MELETCILEELJH. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting; Officer Commissioner of Patents M F'O-105O (10-69) LJSCOMM-DC 50376-F69 U 5 GOVERNMENT PRINNNG OFFIE Y9690-*35633

Patent Citations
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US1488188 *May 7, 1921Mar 25, 1924Anderberg AndersCombined feed-water heater and spark arrester
US1901090 *Jul 16, 1931Mar 14, 1933Siemens AgMultiple heat exchange coil
US2162152 *Feb 27, 1935Jun 13, 1939William A WulleAir conditioning system
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US2980404 *Nov 7, 1957Apr 18, 1961Union Carbide CorpHeat exchange device
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US3160204 *Aug 29, 1962Dec 8, 1964Gen ElectricHeat exchange including improved supporting bracket
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4671343 *Mar 4, 1985Jun 9, 1987Nisshin Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.Heat exchanger having spirally wound tubes
US4834173 *Nov 20, 1987May 30, 1989American Standard Inc.Pressure actuated baffle seal
WO2009071037A1 *Dec 3, 2007Jun 11, 2009Haase Gfk-Technik GmbhSpiral heat exchanger with plate-shaped carrier
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/67, 165/178, 165/162
International ClassificationF28F9/013, F28F9/007, F28F9/04, F28D7/04, F28D7/00, F28F9/08, F28D7/02
Cooperative ClassificationF28F9/0131, F28F9/08, F28D7/04, F28D7/024
European ClassificationF28F9/013B, F28F9/08, F28D7/02D, F28D7/04