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Publication numberUS3619333 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1971
Filing dateMar 17, 1969
Priority dateMar 17, 1969
Publication numberUS 3619333 A, US 3619333A, US-A-3619333, US3619333 A, US3619333A
InventorsMender Donald H
Original AssigneeMender Donald H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for applying heat bond tape to adjacent carpet sections
US 3619333 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] inventor Donald H. Mender 8500 West 106th Ave., Broomfield, Colo. 80002 [21 J Appl. No. 807,521

[22] Filed Mar. 17, 1969 [45] Patented Nov. 9, 1971 [54] APPARATUS FOR APPLYING HEAT BOND TAPE TO ADJACENT CARPET SECTIONS 6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. Cl 156/583, 156/505 [51] Int. Cl 83% 15/34, 1332b 31/08, B65h 21/00 [50] Field 01 Search 156/583,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,947,346 8/1960 Thompson 156/545 X 3,173,166 3/1965 Christensen... 156/579 X 3,523,176 8/1970 Hill 156/579 X Primary Examiner-Benjamin A. Borchelt Assistant Examiner-J. J. Devitt Anorney-Sheridan, Ross and Burton ABSTRACT: Attachment apparatus for a manually moveable heated carpet seaming iron of the type which melts an adhesivc on one face of a seaming tape, characterized by a tape guide secured to the forward end of the iron which aligns the longitudinal central axis of the tape beneath the seam to be formed, pile guides disposed rearwardly of the guide which press the carpet edges downwardly and into abutting relation, and a trailing presser roll for applying pressure'to ,the carpet and forcing it into contact with the melted adhesive.

PATENTEDN V SHEET 1 0F 3 ATTORNEYS PAIENTEDuuv 9191a SHEET 2 OF 3 mm H mm ATTORNEYS PATENTEDNHY919?! 3, 19,332.

' sum 3 OF 3 f I'IN-VENTOR DONALD H. MENDER JIM, M

ATTORNEYS APPARATUS FOR APPLYING HEAT BOND TAPE TO ADJACENT CARPET SECTIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the carpet art it has long been the practice to manufacture carpet material in roll form which is cut, as required, into sections to fit the floor area which is generally the area between the surrounding walls, commonly known as wall to wall carpeting. This has necessitated joining the edges of adjacent sections of the carpet material to provide an invisible seam which has commonly been performed by hand stitching with thread at the locus where the carpet is to be laid which, as is well known, is a time consuming and laborious operation. While this method is still commonly in use, another method is being increasingly used in which an adhesive coated tape is heat bonded to the adjacent sections adjacent their abutting edges. In the so-called heat bond back seaming method the carpet sections are inverted and the tape applied to the exposed surface of the carpet backing by a heated iron which is moved along the tape, melting the adhesive and bonding it to the carpet sections. This method is cumbersome since it entails reversing or retroverting the sections which are often large and of considerable weight.

In another method, which obviates the disadvantage just referred to, and known as face seaming, the carpet sections are disposed with the backing abutting the floor and lying on the adhesive side of the tape which is temporarily tacked to the floor at its ends and the carpet sections longitudinally stretched. The heated surface of the iron is thus disposed beneath the carpet material and in contact with the coated side of the tape and moved along same. This melts the adhesive as the iron is advanced and the portions of the adjacent sections, trailing the iron, are then forced downwardly into contact with the melted cement, this operation being performed by the fingers of the operator by squeezing the edges of the adjacent sections into abutting relation and forcing same downwardly into contact with'the melted adhesive. One of the disadvantages of this method is that it requires an initial alignment operation of the tape with the seam so that the central longitudinal axis of the tape will lie directly beneath the seam. Another disadvantage is that nonuniform manipulation of the carpet sections in bringing them into contact with the adhesive, produces undesired relative tensions in the tape and carpet which render it difficult to flatten the tape into contact with the floor during the final stretching and securing of the peripheral edges of the carpetto the floor, the tape being considerably less stretchable than the carpet backing material.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is most closely related to the-method just described but differs in that the tape need not be stretched and tacked in predetermined relation to the abutting edges or seams of the carpet sections, the necessary alignment being e'ffected by a guide device affixed to the iron. Another difference resides in the use of a presser roll for forcing the carpet into contact with the adhesive, rather than finger manipulation, which effects a more uniform bond. Additionally, the pile of the carpet on adjacent sections is compressed and guided ahead of the presser roll so that the edges of the adjacent sections are brought into abutting relation, producing an invisible seam. Further, the instrumentalities just described may be readily attached to existing conventional seam irons to render same useable in an improved manner as will further become apparent. If the instrumentalities are not to be used as attachments to existing irons, the latter may be redesigned in certain details to render the instrumentalities integral portions of same. The attainment of the ends just described, along with others, as will become apparent as the description proceeds, form the principal objects of the apparatus and method of this invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective of a conventional carpet seaming iron with the subject of the invention attached to same;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of FIG. 1, illustrating the operative association with a carpet and seaming tape;

FIG. 3 is a section taken on line 3-3, FIG. 2, the carpet and seaming tape being omitted;

FIG. 4 is a partial front elevation as viewed in the direction of arrow 4, FIG. 2, the carpet and seaming tape being omitted;

FIG. 5 is a section taken on line 5--5, FIG. 2, the carpet being omitted; and

FIG. 6 is a rear elevation and section taken on line 66, FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS 7 Referring now to the drawing, and first to FIGS. 1 and 2, seaming iron 10, is of conventional construction and commercially available, comprising a rectangular base plate 12 to which is affixed a handle 14 for moving the iron along a seaming tape 16 which bonds adjacent sections of carpet I8 together with their longitudinal edges in abutting relation to thus provide an invisible seam. Base plate 12 contains an electrical heating element (not shown) and any suitable controls, such as a thermostat control 20, all as well understood in the art.

The attachments which are added to the conventional iron just described comprise, in the order in which they operate as the iron is advanced along the tape: a tape guide 22, a fin 24, a pair of pile guides or pressers 25, 25a'attached to the fin, and a trailing presser roll 26, each of which will now be described in detail.

Tape guide 22 may be formed of wire material havinga straight run 27 which moves between the floor and the carpet, its ends being bent to form bights 28, 28a so spaced to permit the opposite edges of the tape to be guided in same so that its longitudinal axis is directly below the edges of the adjacent carpet sections. The upper ends terminate in axially aligned and-outwardly directed legs 30, 30a, which are pivotally carried by legs 32, 32a, of a bifurcated plate, the bight portion 34 of which is attached to the front face of the ironby a pair of screws 36. The wire material is so bent to abut the plate and limit pivoted movement to the full line position shown in FIG. 2. When not in use, however, it may be swung upwardly to the dotted position shown in FIG. 2.

Fin 24, which may be of sheet metal, is attached to handle 14 by brackets 38, 40 which encircle the handle and are rigidly secured to same by screws 42, 44 which pass through legs of the brackets and through suitable apertures in fin 24.

Pile guides 25, 25a are identical, except for being right and left hand, and each is constructed of angle material, the for? ward end of one leg of each angle being pivotally connected to the I'm by a screw 46. A wing screw 48 joins the legs just referred to, the screw passing through a slot 50 to permit angular adjustment around screw 46. The other leg of each angle member is curved slightly at its training end, as best shown in FIG. 2, which forms a curved converging throat 52 into which the carpet may be fed. As will be apparent, the throat may be adjusted for variable thickness of carpet.

Presser roll 26 is rotatably carried by members 54, 54a, a cross member 56 being secured to same to which is attached a member 58, the forward end of which is bifurcated and pivotally connected to the tin by a screw 60. A handle 62 extends between the upper ends of members 54, 54a with which pressure may be applied by the operator to apply a desired pressure on roll 26.

In the operation of the apparatus. the two sections of carpet are cut along desired lines and their adjacent edges disposed in abutting relation with tape 16 disposed beneath the seam to be made. The-iron is then inserted between the sections and tape, as illustrated in FIG. 2, at one end of the adjacent carpet sections. As will be apparent, the edges of the adjacent carpet sections pass around the forward end of handle 14 and close together at the trailing end of iron 12. In the operation so far described this is essentially the same as in the prior art of face seaming. When the adhesive, such as a heat meltable resin or the like, is melted to the desired degree of tackiness the iron is gradually advanced by one hand of the operator with the other hand applying a desired downward pressure on handle 62 which forces roll 26 into contact with the carpet pile, applying uniform pressure onto the width of the tape. During the forward movement, fin 24 passes between the edges of the adjacent carpet sections which move into throat 52 and are urged downwardly and into abutting relation by the trailing ends of pile guides 25, 25a. As the iron advances, bights 28, 28a of tape guide 22 engage the edges of the tape and align its central longitudinal axis to a position directly beneath the adjacent edges of the carpet sections.

The tape guide, pile guide and presser roll 26 cooperate in a unique manner of particular utility in connection with the face seaming technique as just described in the operation of the device. While this is a preferred mode of operation it will now be apparent that the deice may be otherwise employed. For example, the attachments may be removed and the iron employed for all purposes originally intended, such as conventional back seaming. This may be enhanced if so desired, by utilizing the presser roll to force the tape onto the carpet backing after the tape adhesive has been melted, rather than applying this force by only the heated iron. The pile guides would, of course, not be employed in this operation, however, the tape guide could be optionally employed if so desired. Similarly, if the iron is to 'be employed in the conventional manner of performing a face seaming operation, as described in connection with the prior art, tape guide 22 may be employed without use of the pile guide or presser roll. it thus becomes further apparent that while the three principal components referred to have cooperatively utility in one specific use of the apparatus, they also have individual utility in other uses of same.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. it is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

I claim:

1. in a conventional heated iron of the type adapted to be manually moved along a tape having a meltable adhesive on one face of same for bonding the tape to adjacent carpet sections, said iron having a handle affixed to same:

a. attachment apparatus for said iron, comprising;

b. a tape guide disposed ahead of the leading end of said iron adapted to guide the longitudinal central axis of the tape beneath the iron in a predetermined constant path, said tape guide being movably carried by the iron between operative and inoperative positions, said tape guide being formed of bent wirelike material having a straight run adapted to move beneath the tape, retroverted portions at the ends of the straight run forming bights for engaging opposite edges of the tape, the retroverted portions terminating in, aligned legs pivotally carrying same for movement between said positions;

c. a fin disposed above an intermediate portion of the iron adapted to move between adjacent edges of the carpet sections;

d. pile guides disposed rearwardly of the trailing end of the fin for engaging the carpet pile and pressing the edges of the carpet sections downwardly and together in abutting relation;

e. a presser roll disposed rearwardly of the pile guides upon which downward pressure may be manually applied to force the carpet sections into contact with adhesive melted by the iron; and

f. means for affixing said attachment apparatus to the iron.

2. Attachment apparatus in accordance with claim 1 wherein said presser roll is pivotally carried by said fin for applying the downward pressure.

3. Attachment apparatus in accordance with claim 2 wherein the presser roll is pivotally carried by the forward end of a member extending rearwardly from the fin, said member supporting a handle disposed substantially directly above the presser roll for manually applying said downward pressure.

4. Apparatus in accordance with claim 1 including means for rigidly affixing said fin to said handle, means for adjustably affixing said pile guides to opposite sides of said fin, and means for pivotally connecting said presser roll to said fin to permit application of said downward pressure.

5. Apparatus in accordance with claim 4 wherein the means for affixing said fin to said handle comprises a pair of spaced clamps, each encircling a portion of said handle and clamping the fin to same.

6. In a conventional heated iron of the type adapted to be manually carried along a tape having a meltable adhesive on one face of same for bonding the tape to adjacent carpet sections, said iron having a handle affixed to same:

a. attachment apparatus for said iron, comprising;

b. a tape guide disposed ahead of the leading end of said iron adapted to guide the longitudinal central axis of the tape beneath the iron in a predetermined constant path;

c. a fin disposed above an intermediate portion of the iron adapted to move between adjacent edges of the carpet sections;

d. pile guides disposed rearwardly of the trailing end of the fin for engaging the carpet pile and pressing the edges of the carpet sections downwardly together in abutting relation, said pile guides being pivotally carried by opposite sides of said fin and adjustable to provide converging throats of variable size for carpets of variable thickness, said pile guides each being L-shaped in cross section and pivotally connected adjacent their forward ends to said fin, a slot in said fin, and clamping means extending through the slot for clamping the guides to the fin in various positions thereby to provide said converging throats;

e. a presser roll disposed rearwardly of the pile guides upon which downward pressure may be manually applied to force the carpet sections into contact with adhesive melted by the iron; and

f. means for affixing said attachment apparatus to the iron.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2947346 *Oct 25, 1956Aug 2, 1960Thompson Robert DMethod and apparatus for making foambacked materials in broad widths and product thereof
US3173166 *Apr 15, 1963Mar 16, 1965Christensen Marvin LAsphalt shingle tabber
US3523176 *Dec 18, 1967Aug 4, 1970Roberts Consolidated IndElectric iron for heat sensitive adhesive tape for seaming carpets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3972768 *Jul 8, 1974Aug 3, 1976Roberts Consolidated Industries, Inc.Carpet seaming tape, electric iron therefor
US4160688 *Feb 3, 1977Jul 10, 1979Johns-Manville CorporationLow profile heat sealing iron
US4174249 *Sep 22, 1977Nov 13, 1979Bopst John H IiiSystem for instantaneous sealing of cracked lines in plaster
US4235652 *Mar 12, 1979Nov 25, 1980Johns-Manville CorporationMethod of using a low profile heat sealing iron
US4483896 *Feb 4, 1983Nov 20, 1984Seam TeamCarpet seaming tape with separate heating circuits
US4565728 *Oct 1, 1984Jan 21, 1986Seam Team, Inc.System and method for application of internal heating to thermally responsive structures
US4584040 *Jan 30, 1984Apr 22, 1986Partnership Of Lloyd E. Anderson, Betty P. Anderson And Martin L. AndersonCarpet seaming apparatus
US4729810 *Feb 7, 1986Mar 8, 1988Brooks Ronald HCarpet tape dispenser
US6367535Jun 6, 1996Apr 9, 2002Michael Richard ChouinardKneeler device for use in making carpet seams
US20070248772 *Apr 25, 2006Oct 25, 2007Charles CookInlaying process for installing features in a synthetic sports field
WO1986004568A1 *Feb 7, 1986Aug 14, 1986Brooks Ronald HCarpet tape dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/579, 156/505, 156/583.1
International ClassificationA47G27/04, A47G27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0443
European ClassificationA47G27/04C1