Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3619336 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1971
Filing dateJan 19, 1970
Priority dateJan 19, 1970
Also published asCA924083A1, DE2102224A1
Publication numberUS 3619336 A, US 3619336A, US-A-3619336, US3619336 A, US3619336A
InventorsHughes George H
Original AssigneeBeacon Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stitched composite nonwoven fabric having foam supporting layer and outer fibrous layers
US 3619336 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,405,674 10/1968 Coates etal.......,.......... 161/50X 3,352,739 11/1967 Blue 161/159 X Primary Examiner-Philip Dier Allorney-- Parrott, Bell, Seltzer, Park 5 Gibson ABSTRACT: A stitched, composite, integrated, multilayer nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and specifically characterized by improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience, washability, bulk, strength and insulating qualities. The fabric comprises a supporting layer of three-dimensional, compressible, resilient, cellular, resinous foam material having an integral network extending in random directions to define a multiplicity of cells; upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining facing layers of nonwoven textile fibers superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with the supporting layer to completely cover the supporting layer and form the multiplelayer fabric having outer faces with textile fiber characteristics; and elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of the facing layers and for stitch-bonding together the superimposed layers to form the composite fabric. The resulting composite nonwoven fabric may include napped and/or ribbed outer surfaces to provide desired characteristics.

e r waw z I,

United States Patent [72] Inventor Georgell. Hughes Asheville, N.C. 3,745

[21 Appl. No.

[22] Filed Jan. 19, 1970 [45] Patented Nov. 9, 1971 [73] Assignee Beacon Manufacturing Company Swannanoa, N.C.

[54] STITCHED COMPOSITE NONWOVEN FABRIC HAVING FOAM SUPPORTING LAYER AND OUTER FIBROUS LAYERS 5 Claims, 4Drawing Figs.

[50] FieldofSeal-chm...............,.........................

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1966 Smithson...................... 12/1955 Mather.....

3,242,508 2,725,835 3,410,748 11/1968 B1ue..... 3,392,078 7/1968 PATENTEHNBV 9 INVENTORI GEOEGE PR HUGHES BYMM W' {M ATTORNEYS STITCI-IED COMPOSITE N ONWOVEN FABRIC HAVING FOAM SUPPORTING LAYER AND OUTER FIBROUS LAYERS This invention relates to a stitched, composite, integrated, multilayer, nonwoven fabric.

It is the object of this invention to provide such a fabric which is particularly adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and which is specifically characterized by improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience washability, bulk, strength and insulating qualities.

By this invention, it has been found that the above object may be accomplished by providing a fabric comprising a supporting layer of three-dimensional, compressible, resilient, cellular, resinous foam material having an integral network extending in random directions throughout the supporting layer to define a multiplicity of cells. The fabric further comprises upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining facing layers of nonwoven textile fibers superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with the supporting layer to completely cover the supporting layer and to form the multiple-layer fabric. The fibers of the facing layers are oriented in the widthwise direction of the fabric. The fabric further comprises elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of the upper and lower facing layers and for stitch-bonding together the superimposed layers to form the composite, integrated, multiple-layer fabric. The rows of stitches extend in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric.

The above novel composite, integrated, multilayer, nonwoven fabric is adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and may include desirable surface treatments on one or both faces thereof to adapt the same for such uses. While two such combinations of surface treatments are illustrated in the drawings and will be described specifically hereinafter, it is to be understood that this invention is intended to cover various surface treatments of the novel nonwoven fabric defined herein.

These surface treatments may include napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover substantially the rows of stitches penetrating the superimposed layers and provide the desired finish on the fabric. These napped raised fibers may be disposed on one or both of the faces of the composite fabric. A fabric with surface treatments of napped raised fibers is particularly suitable for use as blankets and may be suitable for use as garments.

The composite fabric may also include a ribbed surface on 'one face thereof to provide a bedspread appearance thereon. The other face thereofmay include napped fibers or other surface treatment to provide a blanketlike appearance. In this embodiment of the invention, the rows of stitches comprise closely spaced-apart, parallel, exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions disposed on one of the faces of the fabric and compressing the one face of the fabric along the rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong. The portions of the face of the fabric between the rows of chain stitch loop portions are substantially uncompressed and define spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween is provided on the one face of the fabric. This embodiment may also include napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover the stitches on the other face of the fabric. This fabric with the ribbed face and napped fibrous face may also be used for garments.

Preferably, the rows of stitches utilized in the composite fabric of this invention are formed from at least two continuous yarns and have chain stitch loop components on one ofthe faces of the fabric and interconnected diagonally extending and straight line stitch components on the other face of the fabric. The chain stitch loop components are formed from both of the yarns and the diagonally extending stitch components are formed from one of the yarns and the straight line stitch components are formed from the other of the yarns.

This type of stitch construction, in addition to providing added strength to the composite fabric, will provide an interlocked stitch construction which will not ravel or dislocate itself during use of the fabric for its intended purpose.

It may be seen from the above general description and from the more specific description given hereinafter, that the composite nonwoven fabric of this invention utilizes the inherent features and advantages of a supporting layer of compressible, resilient foam material which provides improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience, washability, bulk and insulating qualities to the composite fabric. Moreover, the composite multilayer fabric utilizes the advantages of outer facing layers of nonwoven fibers oriented in the widthwise direction of the fabric for providing textile fiber characteristics and strength and stability in the widthwise direction to the composite fabric. Additionally, the composite fabric utilizes the advantages of a stitch construction which stitch-bonds the individual fibers of the outer layers with each other and stitchbonds all of the layers of the composite fabric to each other for forming an integrated composite multilayer fabric. These stitches are disposed in the lengthwise direction of the fabric for providing strength and stability to the fabric in the lengthwise direction.

Some of the features and objects of this invention having been stated, other objects and features will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is 'an enlarged, fragmentary, partially exploded, broken away, perspective view of the obverse side of the stitched, composite, multilayer nonwoven fabric of this invention illustrating the fabric in the two basic stages of its construction;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially exploded, broken away, perspective view of the reverse side of the composite, multilayer, nonwoven fabric of FIG. 1 illustrating the fabric in the two basic stages of its construction;

FIG. 3 is a reduced, perspective view with one corner turned up of the nonwoven fabric of FIGS. 1 and 2 having napped, raised fibers on each of the outer faces thereof; and

FIG. 4 is a reduced, perspective view with one corner turned up of the nonwoven fabric of FIGS. 1 and 2 with a ribbed, stitched surface on one face thereof and napped, raised fibers on the other face thereof.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIGS 1 and 2 the obverse and reverse sides of the stitched, composite, nonwoven fabric constructed according to this invention and generally indicated by the reference numeral 10. FIGS. 1 and 2, as described above, are broken away and include generally exploded portions illustrating the various layers of the composite fabric and portions illustrating the obverse and reverse sides of the various layers of the composite fabric after the same has been stitch-bonded together.

The composite nonwoven fabric 10 comprises a supporting layer 11 of three-dimensional, compressible, resilient, cellular, resinous foam material having an integral network extending in random directions throughout to define a multiplicity of cells. The foam material for this supporting layer 11 may be a polyurethane foam, an ester foam or any suitable type of foam material which provides the above-discussed desired characteristics in the composite fabric.

The composite nonwoven fabric 10 further comprises upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining, facing layers of nonwoven fibers l2 and 13, respectively. These upper and lower facing layers l2 and 13 are superimposed on opposite sides and are contiguous with the supporting layer 11 to completely cover the supporting layer and to form a multiplelayer fabric 10 which has outer faces with textile fiber characteristics. The individual fibers of the outer facing layers 12 and 13 are oriented in the widthwise direction of the fabric to provide strength and stability to the fabric in the widthwise direction.

The nonwoven fibers utilized in the upper and lower facing layers 12 and 13 may be any suitable synthetic fibers including viscose, acrylic, polyester and polyamide fibers, or natural fibers including cotton and wool, or other textile fibers, or blends thereof.

The composite nonwoven fabric further includes elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches 20 penetrating the superimposed layers ll, 12 and 13 for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of the upper and lower facing layers 12 and 13 and for stitch-bonding together all of the superimposed layers 11, 12 and 13 to form the composite, integrated, multiple-layer fabric 10. The rows of stitches 20 extend in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of the fabric for providing strength and stability to the fabric 10 in the lengthwise direction.

The rows of stitches 20 are preferably spaced apart a distance less than the length of the fibers in the outer facing layers to insure the desired stitch-bonding of the fibers and to provide strength and stability to the fabric 10. Each of the rows of stitches 20 are formed from two continuous yarns Y-l and Y-2 and have chain stitch loop components 21 on one face of the fabric 10 and interconnected straight line stitch components 22 and diagonally extending stitch components 23 on the other face of the fabric 10. The stitch loop components 21 are formed from both of the yarns Y-l and Y-2 and the straight line stitch components 22 are formed from one of the yarns Y-l only and the diagonally extending stitch components 23 are formed from the other of the yarns Y-2 only. This arrangement of stitch components provides an interlocked stitch construction which will not ravel or dislocate itself from the composite fabric 10.

The yarns Y-l and Y-2 utilized to form the rows of stitches 20 and the stitch components 21, 22 and 23 may be of various natural or synthetic fibers or blends, but continuous filament synthetic yarns are advantageous to obtain relatively high strength and to prevent breakage in the manufacturing operation and to also give good tensile strength to the finished fabric.

The thus formed composite nonwoven fabric may include suitable outer treated surfaces on the outer faces of the fabric 10 for providing desired characteristics adapting the fabric for use as bed coverings, garments and the like. As illustrated in FIG 3, both outer faces of the composite nonwoven fabric 10 may include surfaces of napped, raised fibers 30 which have been napped and raised to a sufficient height and density to cover the rows of stitches 20 and the stitch components 21, 22 and 23 on both faces of the fabric to provide a desired blanketlike or napped textile fibrous surface.

As shown in FICA one of the faces of the fabric is provided with a surface treatment consisting of a stitched ribbed surface which provides bedspread or ribbed garmentlike characteristics to that face of the fabric. For providing this surface treatment characteristic, the rows of stitches 20 are closely spaced-apart and parallel with the chain stitch loop portions 21 for compressing the face of the fibrous outer layer 12 along the rows 20 to form corresponding depressed areas 35 therealong. The portions of the face of the outer facing layer 12 of nonwoven fibers between the rows ofstitches 20 are substantially uncompressed and define spaced, parallel, raised ribs 36. Thus, a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween is provided on one face of the fabric 10.

For preparing the outer layers of nonwoven fibers l2 and 13 with the fibers thereof oriented in generally a widthwise direction, reference may be had to applicants prior patent U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,55 2, issued July 4, 1967, wherein suitable carding or gametting apparatus, cross lapping and conveying apparatus are illustrated. Also, for a disclosure of suitable apparatus for forming the rows of stitches 20 including the stitch components 21, 22 and 23, reference may be had to applicants prior patent U.S. Pat. No. 3,365,918, issued Jan. 30, 1968, for a disclosure ofsame.

Thus, it may be seen that this invention has provided a novel and improved composite, integrated, multilayer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and which utilizes the individual characteristics and features of the various layers therein and a stitch construction for integrating the layers into the composite fabric which is characterized by improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience, washability, bulk, strength and insulating qualities. This improved fabric also utilizes various surface treatments for providing the desired finish on the fabric.

In the drawings and specification there have been set forth preferred embodiments of the invention and, although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

What is claimed is:

l. A stitched, composite, integrated, multilayer, nonwoven fabric adaptable for use as bed coverings, garments and the like and specifically characterized by improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience, washability, bulk, strength and insulating qualities, said fabric comprising:

a supporting layer comprising three-dimensional, compressible, resilient, cellular, resinous foam material having an integral network extending in random directions throughout said supporting layer to define a multiplicity of cells for providing improved hand, drapability, compressibility, resilience, washability, bulk and insulating qualities to said composite fabric and for providing strength to said fabric in random directions;

upper and lower three-dimensional, self-sustaining, facing layers comprising nonwoven textile fibers and being superimposed on opposite sides of and being contiguous with said supporting layer to completely cover said supporting layer and to form said multiple-layer fabric having outer faces with textile fiber characteristics, said fibers of said facing layers being oriented in the widthwise direction of said fabric to provide strength and stability to said fabric in the widthwise direction; and

elongate, spaced-apart rows of stitches penetrating said superimposed layers for stitch-bonding together the individual fibers of each of said upper and lower facing layers and for stitch-bonding together said superimposed layers to form said composite, integrated, multiple-layer fabric, said rows of stitches extending in the lengthwise direction throughout the length of said fabric for providing strength and stability to said fabric in the lengthwise direction, each of said rows of stitches being formed from at least two continuous yarns and having chain stitch loop components on one of said faces of said fabric and interconnected diagonally extending and straight line stitch components on the other of said faces of said fabric and in which said chain stitch loop components are formed from both of said yarns and in which said diagonally extending stitch components are formed from one of said yarns and said straight line stitch components are formed from the other of said yarns.

2. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, including at least one outer treated surface on at least one of said outer faces comprising napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density as to cover substantially said rows of stitches penetrating said superimposed layers and provide a desired finish on said fabric.

3. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said rows of stitches comprise closely spaced-apart, parallel, exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions disposed on one of said faces of said fabric and compressing said one face of said fabric along said rows to form corresponding depressed areas therealong, the portions of said face of said fabric between said rows of chain stitch loop portions being substantially uncompressed and defining spaced, parallel, raised ribs so that a ribbed surface with exposed rows of chain stitch loop portions therebetween is provided on said one face of said fabric.

4. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 3, in which said other face of said fabric includes napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover said stitches on said other face.

5. A nonwoven fabric, as set forth in claim 1, in which said fabric includes outer treated surfaces on each of said outer faces comprising napped, raised fibers of sufficient height and density to cover said stitches.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2725835 *Apr 27, 1953Dec 6, 1955Robert I MatherComposite carpet and method of making same
US3242508 *Aug 15, 1963Mar 29, 1966Smithson Lee KComposite batt for quilting
US3352739 *Nov 9, 1962Nov 14, 1967Reeves Bros IncFoam and fiber combination product and method of making same
US3392078 *Oct 5, 1964Jul 9, 1968Indian Head Mills IncNonwoven fabric and method of making the same
US3405674 *Mar 15, 1965Oct 15, 1968Kem Wove Ind IncMethod of producing a quilted nonwoven textile product
US3410748 *Mar 4, 1964Nov 12, 1968Reeves Bros IncMethod of bonding porous polyurethane to loosely woven fabric and resultant article
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985130 *May 7, 1975Oct 12, 1976Poly-Wide, Inc.Method of and means for treating burn victims
US4297156 *Feb 1, 1979Oct 27, 1981Dalle & Cie, S.A.Process for manufacture of wall coverings and wall coverings thus obtained
US4330580 *Apr 20, 1981May 18, 1982Dalle & Cie, S.A.Process for manufacture of wall coverings and wall coverings thus obtained
US4891957 *Mar 2, 1989Jan 9, 1990Kimberly-Clark CorporationStitchbonded material including elastomeric nonwoven fibrous web
US5340627 *Jun 20, 1991Aug 23, 1994Cockrell Patricia JFabric craft article
US6438775Apr 28, 2000Aug 27, 2002J. Frank KoenigSleeping pad, bedding and bumpers to improve respiratory efficiency and environmental temperature of an infant and reduce the risks of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and asphyxiation
US6684437Jul 31, 2002Feb 3, 2004J. Frank KoenigSleeping pad, bedding and bumpers to improve respiratory efficiency and environmental temperature of an infant and reduce the risks of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and asphyxiation
US7707670Oct 30, 2008May 4, 2010Tempur-Pedic Management, Inc.Pillow top for a cushion
US8561229 *Sep 3, 2009Oct 22, 2013Pacific Coast Feather Co.Baffle box comforter
USRE29766 *Mar 30, 1977Sep 19, 1978Poly-Wide, Inc.Method of and means for treating burn victims
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/91, 5/502, 28/153, 428/311.51, 428/102
International ClassificationD04H1/44, D04H1/52
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/52
European ClassificationD04H1/52