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Publication numberUS3619895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1971
Filing dateMay 13, 1969
Priority dateMay 13, 1969
Publication numberUS 3619895 A, US 3619895A, US-A-3619895, US3619895 A, US3619895A
InventorsThompson Einar T
Original AssigneeThompson Einar T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nailing machine for wood flooring
US 3619895 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 16, 1971 E. T. THOMPSON NAILING MACHINE FOR WOOD FLOORING Filed May 13, 1969 INVENTOR. E/nar 7: Thompson BY HIS A T TORNE'YS NOV. 16, 1971 THQMPSON 3,619,895

I NAILING MACHINE FOR WOOD FLOORING 7 Filed May 13, 1969 4 Sl100tsShc0t 8 //V VE/V 70/1". Einor T. Thampson B Y file, 4% /3 HIS A TTOR/VEYS Nov. 1 1971 E, T. H P N 3,619,895

NAILING MACHINE FOR WOOD FLOORING Filed May 13, 1969 4 Shoots-Shoot 3 73 //V l/EN TOR. 5/00! I Thompson JIM MQZJA HIS A 7'7'0RNEY5 Nov. 16, 1971 ,E. T. THOMPSON 3,619,895

7 NAILING MACHINE FOR WOOD FLOORING Filed May 13, 1969 4 Sheets-Sheet Fig.

lNVENTO/R Einar 7: Thompson HIS ATTOR/VE Y5 United States Patent 3,619,895 NAILING MACHINE FOR WOOD FLOORING Einar T. Thompson, 107 White Gate Road, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15238 Filed May 13, 1969, Ser. No. 824,226 Int. Cl. 1327f 7/02 U.S. Cl. 29-432 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A floor laying machine is provided having a hammer for forcing flooring members into and retaining them in a tight interlocked tongue and groove fitted relation while a nailer is employed for securing the members in position with respect to each other and on sleepers or joists. The machine is moved on a previously laid floor portion, longitudinally of a floor member to be laid, to secure it to the sleepers or joists and to a previously laid member; the machine has vertical roller means for guiding it along an exposed side edge of a previously laid floor member and may be manually moved back and forth across a room by an operator. Electrical control means including switches and solenoids and fluid control valve means are carried by the machine and used with a pressure fluid for controlling its hammering and nailing operations manually or automatically and, if desired, independently.

The invention pertains to apparatus that will facilitate the laying of flooring such as wood floor members, particularly for larger spaces such as gymnasiums, auditoriums, storage buildings, etc. A phase of the invention deals with a machine or apparatus that greatly simplifies providing and maintaining a positioning of floor members with respect to each other, and while quickly and efficiently nailing or securing them together at joist or sleeper portions of a floor support structure.

In carrying out the invention, a primary support frame is provided that carries a board mallet or hammer as well as a nailing or stapler and electrical switches and fluid control valves for effecting a desired operation of the hammer and nailer. The frame is provided with a pair of vertically-positioned edge rollers that have an offset portion, such as a recess or groove, to register in a complementary manner with an offset portion, such a tongue portion of a floor member being positioned, and with a pair of floor-engaging horizontal rollers to facilitate movement along the surface of previously laid floor members. Detachable means is provided and removably connected to the support frame, in order that an operator may move the machine along the surface of laid floor members adjacent to the exposed side edge of the last laid member and as guided along the side edge of the floor member being laid. Although not illustrated for simplicity of illustration, it will be apparent that the device may also be motor operated for floor movement. Also, although pneumatic or compressed air operation has been provided, it will be apparent that any suitable operating fluid or operation controlling and accomplishing means may be employed for actuating the hammer and the nailer.

In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a circuit diagram and fluid flow schematic showing of an operating system for a device or machine of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a side view in elevation of a machine constructed in accordance with the invention which illustrates it in an operating position with respect to a floor that is being laid; in this view, full lines illustrate the use of an operators seat support frame attachment and dot and dash lines illustrate the alternate use of a U-shaped Patented Nov. 16, 1971 ice handle that may be employed for advancing the machine along flooring being laid.

FIG. 3 is a top plan view on the scale of and of the machine or apparatus of FIG. 2, taken through a section of flooring between a pair of spaced-apart joists.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged left side view of primary support frame and main operating apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2; in this figure, a side cover has been removed and its hammer or mallet is in a down or floor member hammering-in position.

FIG. 4A is a fragmental horizontal section on the scale of and taken along the line IVAIVA of FIG. 4;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the apparatus of and on the scale of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a vertical view in elevation on the same scale as and of the primary support frame and apparatus of FIGS. 4 and 5, but taken from the right-hand or opposite side of the machine.

FIG. 7 is a bottom plan view of the apparatus of and on the scale of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a front section in elevation on the scale of and of the apparatus shown in FIGS. 4 t0 7, inclusive.

FIG. 9 is a rear view in elevation on the scale of and of the apparatus of FIG. 8 showing it from the outside of an end closure member or plate.

FIG. 10 is a fragmental side view in elevation and partial section taken from the left side of the machine and particularly illustrating a hammer or mallet unit of the construction and its operating mechanism; in this figure, full lines show the hammer in its down position and the dash lines show it in its up or ready position.

FIG. L1 is a horizontal section on the scale of and taken along the line XI-XI of FIG. 10.

And, FIG. 12 is a greatly enlarged fragmental side section taken in the same direction as FIG. 6 and particularly illustrating the completion of a nailing operation and the partial withdrawal of the mailer.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, a floor-layingmachine or apparatus or main operating part A is shown mounted on and with respect to and as substantially enclosed by members of a main or primary support frame 30 having a front, angle-shaped cover member 45. A preferred auxiliary part of the machine A is represented by a seat part or structure B which is shown removably-connected to a backWardly-extending hitch or connector member 34 of the machine A by a forwardlyprojecting hitch or connector member 42 and by bolt and nut assemblies 43 to provide a unitary structure. The main operating part A, as further illustrated in FIGS. 4, 6, 7, and 9, has a pair of horizontally-positioned floor-surfaceengaging rollers 37 carried by the base portion of its frame 30 for wheeled movement along a completed portion of a floor construction C. It also is shown provided with a pair of vertically-projecting and spaced-apart side edge engaging rollers 38 that are adapted to engage and guidably move along an outer exposed side edge of a wooden floor member 5' that is being laid. As shown in FIGS. 4, 6 and 11, each roller 38 has an annular recess or groove portion 38a that is adapted to fit over a tongue portion of a length of a nailable or wooden floor member 5' being laid.

Alignment of the part A with respect to the exposed edge of the floor member 5 may be maintained by an operator sitting on a seat 41 carried by an upwardlyprojecting frame 40 of the part B. The operator will sit with his legs in a forward position, straddling the connector 42, and applying both a side-wise moving force to the apparatus and a backward tension thereto to maintain the rollers 38 in engagement with the exposed portion of the flooring. The frame 40, as shown particularly in FIGS. 2 and 3, has a pair of pivotal wheels or rollers 44 that are horizontally mounted in a spaced relation to ride along the upper surface of the flooring C. If desired, an externally-applied force may be used for aid in maintaining the relation of FIGS. 2 and 3, by connecting one end of a tension spring carrying cable to the back side of the frame 40 and its other end to a sliding wall guide (not shown). However, for an ordinary operation, this is unnecessary and thus has not been illustrated as the operator has no difficulty in applying the necessary slight pull-back force to maintain the rollers 38 in engagement with the exposed edge of a wood floor member '5 while moving the machine A and the seat B across the floor C, longitudinal of members being laid.

The operating or main part A has a fluid motor operated hammer unit 25 that may be of a construction, such as manufactured and sold commercially by Bimba Manufacturing Co. of Monee, Ill., and which is represented as a double-acting, pivot type air cylinder hammer, catalog No. 170DP. The fluid motor of this hammer unit is of a type having a piston for providing positive forward and backward or retractive movements by reversing the application of a pressure fluid, such as applied to the cylinder of the motor. Referring to FIG. 1, such reversal is accomplished in the present construction by a dual-way valve 17 that is operated in a forward hammer blow accomplishing direction by energization of its solenoid 16 and that is moved in an opposite direction by a conventional tension spring return for reversing the flow of air to the unit 25 when the solenoid is deenergized.

As indicated in FIGS. 4 and 10, the fluid motor of hammer unit 25 has a piston rod 65 provided with a pivot connection at 66 to one end of an upper extension member or piece 64 that is rigidly secured to an upper foot portion of an angle-shaped hammer arm 60. A lower or acting hammer part or head member 61 is at one end securely-connected by assembly 62 to a lower end of the angle-shaped member 60 to extend horizontally-forwardly thereof when the hammer arm is in its blowdelivering position, represented by the solid lines of FIG. 10. A forward, blow-delivering end portion of the hammer member 61 is of bifurcated construction to straddle the longitudinal groove along the exposed side of a floor member 5 that is being laid. The down movement of 60 from the dash position of FIG. to the solid position is accomplished by a positive blast of air applied to the fluid motor of the hammer unit to effect a driving-in hammer blow such that the groove along the opposite longitudinal side edge of the member 5 will be in a securely latched and engaging relation along the complementary tongue portion of a previously laid member 5 at the time a nailing blow is being effected by unit 27. This operation is accomplished substantially simultaneously with a nailing operation to thus apply two opposing forces to opposite sides of the member 5. It will be noted that the member 5' is preliminarily handlaid in position, The hammer 60 serves as a back-up position-retaining means for the member 5' while it is being nailed to a joist 6 by nailing unit or nailer 27. The unit 27 may be of a commercial design such as manufactured by Pasalode Company Division of Signode Corporation of Skokie, Ill., as its Bronco model 91030 nailer.

Nailer 27 which is shown mounted on the support frame of the part A has a spring-pressed valve-opening trigger finger 74 (see FIG. 6) that when depressed against spring tension, opens trigger valve 22 (see FIG. 1) to apply fluid pressure to its fluid motor 20. An application of positive fluid pressure through line n of FIG. 1 and trigger valve 22 to fluid motor 20 causes a positive forward nailing stroke to be imparted to nailing head 73 of the nailer 27 to drive a nail 7, fed from its delivery magazine 70. A nail 7 is picked up by the head 73 from delivery magazine 70 and driven (as shown in FIG. 12) in an inclined relation through the floor member 5 being laid and into a supporting joist 6. The fluid motor 20 is spring-biased to return to its original or starting position when trigger finger 74 is released and valve 22 is thus closed.

FIG. 1 of the drawings shows an operating layout for apparatus of the invention. As indicated, the hammering and nailing units 25 and 27 are controlled or indirectly energized by an electric power source or supply, represented by lines a and b, such as provided by a conventional 110 volt AC household source through flexible cable 53 (see FIGS. 2 and 3). For manual operation, a single throw switch 10 is shown positioned between main line a and control circuit or line c. For automatic operation, a single throw switch 12 is shown positioned in a circuit or line e that is connected between a and c and has a feeler-operated micro-switch 13. The switch 13 (such as manufactured and sold by the Micro Switch Division of Honeywell, see catalog 50d), is normally biased to an open position by a spring and is moved to a closed position by a feeler rod or finger 13a that is adapted to engage a joist or cross extending floor support member 6 to thus automatically set into operation hammering and nailing units 25 and 27. A timer switch 2 1, such as of a conventional thermal type, is provided in the circuit e to automatically cut-off current flow after each group of hammering and nailing blows has been delivered, irrespective of whether or not switches 12 or 13 are still closed. When the machine A reaches the next joist 6 in line, the timer 21 has again closed its contacts and thus, the feeler switch 13 becomes operative to again set the units into operation when it is closed by engagement with the joist.

For normal unitary or substantially simultaneous complementary operation of the hammer 25 and nailer 27, single throw switches 14 and 15 will be moved to their closed positions to energize lines It and i; also, single throw single contact switch 12 will be closed to energize circuit e. Energization of circuit h energizes solenoid 16 of reversing valve 17 to cause a positive flow of pressure fluid along fluid flow piping or line 0 and a return or exhaust flow along line 1. This causes a substantially immediate down or hammer stroke of the hammer arm 60. At the same time, current flow in the circuit i causes energization of the solenoid 18 of control valve 19 to cause it to be moved from a closed to an open position; a positive fluid pressure flow then occurs along line or piping q and a return flow along the line m. The valve 19 is normally spring-biased to a closed position. This (see also FIG. 6) causes a forward energization of the piston of a fluid motor 26 against the resistance of its position return spring to move in its piston rod 78 (move it to the left in FIG. 6) to actuate a crank 77 and a lever arm 76,

The lever arm 76 is, at its lower end, connected to a slide cam block to move the block to the right and cause a closing movement or engagement with the valve trigger finger 74 of the nailer unit 27. This in turn causes its control valve 22 to open against its spring closing bias to introduce positive fluid pressure from line n to fluid motor 20 of the nailer 27 to actuate its head 73 to a nail pick-up and driving-in movement. It will be noted that the fluid motor 20 is normally spring-biased to a closing position which it will attain when the trigger operated valve 22 is closed by release of pressure on its finger 74.

A fully manual operation can be accomplished by opening switch 12 and closing switch 10. If both the hammer 25 and the nailer 27 are to be operated, switch 14 will be closed and switch 15 will be closed. If the nailer 27 is to be rendered inoperative, switch 14 may be opened; if the hammer is to be rendered inoperative, switch 15 may be opened.

In FIG. 1, P and P are pressure gauges respectively in main fluid pressure input line I and a branch line It. The valve 28 in the line I: is a commercial fluid volume flow reducing valve that is adjustable to provide a correct pressure for operation of the nailer 27. In this figure, line 1 represents the positive pressure input line for the air or other operating fluid, while m represents the exhaust line which need not be extended from a machine unit. In FIGS. 2 and 3, the line I is shown represented by an inlet line or pipe member 52 carried by and extending from the part A and as supplied by a flexible hose or pipe member 50 that extends, for example, from an air compressor. A quick detachable coupling or connector 51 is provided between adjacent ends of the pipe members 50 and 52. In the same figures, electrical energy is supplied to the unit A and particularly to the main lines a and b by flexible electric cable '53 that has a conventional plug at its end that is detachably-connected to a female plug 54 carried by the front end portion of the main support frame 30, see also FIGS. and 9.

As illustrated particularly in FIGS. 4 and 6, the frame 30 is shown provided with an angle-shaped mounting bracket 55 secured thereto for mounting the nailer unit 27 in position, and with a pair of angle-shaped cooperating bracket members 56 also mounted thereon for reinforcing the structure and, at their point of abutment, for supporting and slidably guiding cam block 75 thereon through the agency of a nut and bolt assembly 57. The cam 75 has an elongated slot therein; the assembly 57 extends through the slot to loosely-slidably support the cam 75 in a grooved or centrally-recessed portion of the shelf provided between the bracket members 56. One end of lever arm 76 is securely connected to the slide cam 75 for moving it back and forth on the shelf.

As shown particularly in FIG. 6, a U-shaped bracket member 58 is secured at its upper leg to the frame 30, and valve operated fluid motor 26 is secured to extend through its central portion. A lower leg of the bracket member 58 carries solenoid-operated, fluid flow reversing valve 17.

As shown particularly in FIG. 10, a bifurcated mount 69 is secured to the stationary frame 30 and has a pivot pin 68 that pivotally-supports or carries a lower end mount portion 67 of the fluid motor 25. It will be apparent that the motor 25 has a swingable or pivotal mounting from the standpoint of both of its ends, since at its upper end it carries piston rod 65 that is pivotally mounted by a pin 66 on one end of upper extension piece or member 64. As a result, the member 64, as well as the hammer arm structure 60, will be moved by a down stroke of the piston rod 65 to the upper dotted position of FIG. 10, and will be moved to its hammering, solid line position by an up stroke thereof. A commercial nailer unit, as represented by 27, has a staple or nail carrying magazine 70 extending from its nailing head 73 to automatically feed a nail or a staple each time with a forward movement of its head towards a driving position. A springloaded follower 71 holds a stack of nails or staples in a forward position along the magazine 70.

As shown in FIGS. 4, 6 and 8, the nailer unit 27 has an air vent 27a at its upper end and is carried by a U- shaped mounting bracket 80. As shown particularly in FIG. 4, the bracket 80 is removably-secured at its base to the top end of the unit 27 by bolts 81 and has an offset pair of side legs that carry mounting pins or stub shafts 82. A pair of mounting arm members 84 and 86 swingably or rotatably receive projecting ends of the pin shafts '82 to, in effect, swingably carry the unit 27 therebetween. The arm member 84 is shown as bent and as having its base portion removably-secured to the frame 30 by bolts 85. On the other hand, the bracket 86 of shorter length may be secured as by welding to the frame 30. Referring particularly to FIG. 4A, the unit 27 is shown as resiliently-held in a central position on its mounting pins 82 by a pair of spring coils or spirals 87, each of which is carried in an opposed relation with respect to the other by a pair of mounting cups 30a and 72a, respectively carried by the frame 30 and by the housing of the unit 27.

The above mounting of the nailer unit 27 is important in the operation of the machine in that it enables a nail to be aligned with a floor member 5' by the unit 27 and to be driven into such floor member without either bending the wire-like nail or necessitating stoppage of sidewise movement of the machine along the floor space. In other words, the swingable, spring-centered mounting of the nailer unit 27 enables it to slightly pivot or swing to start and finish its nailing operation Without damage to the nail and without stopping the movement of the unit A or interfering with a continuous type of operation. The springs 87 return the unit 27 to its central position after each nailing operation has been completed. Ordinarily, about A of an inch swing of the unit 27 is the maximum needed when Walking the machine along the previously laid floor portion.

Summarized briefly, the floor laying machine unit A may, as shown, be moved manually lengthwise of nailable flooring members, 5 and '5, such as of wood, which are being laid either by means of an operator seated on the part B and using his feet for guided sidewise move ment or preferably by means of a U-shaped push or pull frame 33 of rod-like construction (see FIGS. 2 and 3) that may at its ends be removably-positioned in one of a pair of hollow sockets 32 carried on opposite side wall or enclosing plate members 21 that may be removably-secured to the frame 30, as by metal screws. When the handle 33 is used, then the part B may be detached by removing the bolt and nut assemblies 43. As previously indicated, pull-back force or pressure may be exerted on the part A by auxiliary means such as a spring tension pull cable, not shown.

The apparatus of the invention is particularly suitable for laying wide or large floor surfaceareas and is put in operation after a preliminary portion of the floor, such as represented by C, has, for example, been installed in a conventional manner by hand. When one flooring member, such as 5, has been nailed along its length to cooperating joist members 6-, then another one 5 is manually placed in alignment with its groove being received by the tongue of a previously laid member. The machine is then operated tov quickly and simultaneously deliver a hammer blow to the outer side edge of the member 5' being laid or nailed in position while a nail is being driven from the other side edge by nailer unit 27.

In utilizing a machine or apparatus of the invention, before operation of the floor laying apparatus or machine constituting operating frame or part A and control frame or part B is initiated, floor boards '5, 5 may be laid and secured in place manually at a back end of the room to provide a starting platform represented by the floor C (see FIGS. 2 and 3). Floor boards 5 that are to be laid will be placed by hand in position across joists 6 to, as shown in FIG. 3, provide a continuous, cross-extending, in-line progression. After the machine has been rolled on the floor C, the guide rollers 38 may be linedup with a floor member 5" to be laid. At the same time, coupling 51 may be connected to a source of fluid under pressure, such as an air compressor or tank, and electrical energy-supplying cable 53 may be inserted in the plug 54. This provides electrical energy for, as shown in FIG. 1, operating valve control solenoids, and positive air or other fluid pressure for use in actuating the hammer 60 as well as the nailing unit 27. When these sources of energy are connected, the operator may move the apparatus assembly sideways or longitudinally along a floor member 5', at right angles to the support members 6, continuously from one side of the room till the other side is reached, and back and forth between the sides of the room.

The finger 13a automatically causes the actuation of the hammer and the nailer substantially simultaneously as the unit A comes into alignment with each of the support members 6. However, the construction is such that the operator may continue to move the device during the hammering and nailing operations and this is made possible, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 4A, by the pivoted, flexible mounting of the nailer unit 27 on the frame A. The back and forth operations may be repeated for each series of longitudinally extending floor members 5 that are to be laid until the opposite or forward end of the room has been reached by the front end of the unit A. The apparatus may then be moved out of position and the last few floor members for the forward end of the room laid and nailed manually.

Although an embodiment of the invention has been shown for the purpose of illustrating the principles of the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications, additions, subtractions and variations may be practiced without departing from its spirit and scope.

1 claim:

1. In a mobile floor laying apparatus for back and forth movement on a previously laid floor portion along the lengthwise extent of an individual floor member being laid for progressively securing individual floor members on spaced-apart cross-extending floor support members in an aligned sidewise-engaging complementary fitting relation along and with a side edge of a previously laid floor member that is secured on the floor support members: a frame having wheels for moving it on the previously laid floor portion, guide means adapted to engage and move along an outer side edge of a floor member to be laid, a hammer unit operatively-mounted on said frame to deliver a hammer blow to an outer side edge of a floor member being laid in a direction towards the previously laid floor member, a nailing unit provided with a nail feed operatively positioned on said frame in an opposed position relation with respect to said hammer unit for driving a nail through the floor member being laid adjacent its inner side edge and into an aligned floor support member, means for coordinating the operation of said hammer unit with the operation of said nailing unit, means for positively actuating said nailing unit to deliver a nailing blow, and electrical means for automatically effecting operation of said actuating means each time said frame is moved into alignment with a floor support member.

2. In an apparatus as defined in claim 1, electrical control means positioned on said frame and adapted to operate said hammer and nailing units when said frame has been moved into alignment with each floor support member.

3. In an apparatus as defined in claim 1, motor means for positively actuating said hammer unit in its blow delivering direction, motor means for positively actuating said nailing unit to deliver a nailing blow, and an electrical system having means for actuating said motors independently as well as dependently, said electrical system having switch means for automatically eflecting operation of said motor means each time said frame has been moved into alignment with a floor support member.

4. In an apparatus as defined in claim 1, electrical control means on said frame, said hammer and nailing units each having a fluid motor for actuating it to effect the respective hammer blow delivering and nail driving opera tions, means including valves for delivering fluid under positive pressure to said fluid motors, said electrical con trol means being operatively connected for controlling the operation of said valves, and said electrical control means having switch means adapted to be closed for operating said valves each time said frame is moved into substantial alignment with a floor support member, whereby said hammer and nailing units will be actuated to deliver a hammer blow and to drive a nail at each floor support member.

5. In an apparatus as defined in claim l, a second frame extending backwardly from and being connected to said first-mentioned frame, said second frame having wheels for moving it along the previously laid floor portion and having an elevated seat for an operator, said second frame having a backwardly-spaced relation with said first-mentioned frame whereby an operator sitting on said seat may move both of said frames as a unit along the floor surface portion by using his legs and feet on the previously laid floor portion and may apply a backward force to maintain said guide means in engagement with the outer side edge of a floor member being laid.

6. In an apparatus as defined in claim 5, a hitch member extending backwardly from said first-mentioned frame, a hitch member extending forwardly from said second frame, and means for securely-removably connecting said hitch members together at their extending ends.

7. In an apparatus as defined in claim 1, an electric circuit carried by said frame and having means for connecting its input to a source of electricity, a fluid pressure system carried by said frame and having control valves therein, fluid motors carried by said frame for actuating said hammer and said nailing units in their positive movements, said control valves having electric solenoids for operating them to supply fluid under positive pressure to said fluid motors, switch means in said electrical circuit for periodically energizing said solenoids, said switch means comprising a feeler switch carried by said electric circuit to engage a floor support member when said frame is moved into alignment therewith for movement into a closed position to energize said solenoids, and when said frame is moved away from the floor support member to move to an open position and de-energize said solenoids, one of said solenoid operated control valves being a reversing valve for applying positive fluid pressure to opposite ends of the fluid motor for said hammer to positively move said hammer in forward and return stroke directions, and the fluid motor for said nailer unit having spring means for normally returning it to a starting position after it has been moved forwardly in a nailing stroke.

8. In a mobile floor laying apparatus for back and forth movement on a previously laid floor portion along the lengthwise extent of an individual floor member being laid and for progressively securing individual floor members in a sidewise-engaging complementary fitting relation along and with a side edge of a previously laid floor member at spaced-apart cross-extending floor support members: a frame having wheels for moving it on the previously laid floor portion and having guide means adapted to engage and move along an outer side edge of a floor member to be laid, a hammer unit operatively mounted on said frame to deliver a hammer blow to an outer side edge of a floor member being laid in a direction towards the previously laid floor member, a nailing unit provided with a nail feed operatively positioned on said frame in an opposed position relation with respect to said hammer unit for driving a nail through the floor member being laid adjacent its inner side edge and into an aligned floor support member substantially simultaneously with the delivery of a blow by said hammer unit, means swingably mounting said nailing unit on said frame for movement in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the apparatus on the floor portion, and means for resisting movement of and for returning said nailing unit to a central position on the apparatus after a nail has been driven thereby.

9. In a mobile floor laying apparatus for back and forth movement on a previously laid floor portion along the lengthwise extent of an individual floor member being laid for progressively securing individual floor members on spaced-apart cross-extending floor support members in an aligned sidewise-engaging complementary fitting relation along and with a side edge of a previously laid floor member that is secured on the floor support members: a frame having wheels for moving it on the previously laid floor portion, guide roller means operatively carried by said frame to engage and move along an outer side edge of a floor member to be laid, means for maintaining said guide roller means in tight engagement during the movement of the apparatus along the floor member being laid,

a nailing unit provided with a nail feed operatively positioned on said frame for driving a nail through the floor member being laid adjacent its inner side edge and into an aligned floor support member, and means swingably mounting said nailing unit on said frame for enabling it to accomplish a nailing operation without interfering with a continuous movement of said frame along the floor member being laid.

10. In an apparatus as defined in claim 9, said swingable mounting means being adapted to move in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the apparatus on the floor portion, and means for resisting movement of and for returning said nailing unit to a central position on the apparatus after a nail has been driven thereby.

11. In an apparatus as defined in claim 9, a second frame having wheels for moving it on the previously laid floor portion, a hitch member connecting a back end of said first frame with a front end of said second frame, and said second frame being constructed for applying a pull-back force on said first frame.

12. In an apparatus as defined in claim 9, a hammer unit operatively mounted on said frame to deliver the force of a hammer to the outer side edge of the floor member being laid in a direction towards the previously laid floor member, and means cooperating with said hammer unit for delivering a hammer blow substantially simultaneously with the driving of a nail by said nailing unit through the floor member being laid.

13. In a method of employing a mobile floor laying apparatus for laying individual lengthwise-extending floor members progressively along an outer side edge of a floor member of a previously laid portion of a floor where spaced-apart, cross-extending joists are provided along the floor to support it and extend transversely in an exposed relation from the outer side edge of the floor member, placing a floor member to be laid lengthwise across exposed joists with its inner side edge in close abutment with an outer side edge of the previously laid floor member, downwardly backwardly delivering a hammer blow to the outer side edge of the floor member being laid, driving a nail in a downwardly backwardly inclined direction through the floor member being laid adjacent its inner side edge and into an aligned joist, carrying a nailing device on the apparatus for driving the nail through the floor member being laid, and driving the nail through the floor member being laid into the aligned joist while progressively moving the apparatus with the nailer supported thereon along the floor member being laid.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 463,106 11/1891 Dees.

706,805 8/1902 Daigneault 227-111 2,457,984 1/1949 Dougherty 2271 11 2,631,283 3/1953 Cranston, Ir. 227-7 3,360,176 12/1967 Gehl et a1. 227-148 GRANVILLE Y. CUSTER, JR., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 2277, 111

CEflTEFICATE 0F wRmtmiore' Patent No. 3 5;895

a wwso Dated Novmber I6 1971 Inventofls) I Jhortzpsdn It is ceriifid that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said LettarsTatent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column line 11, change "5" to --5'--; line 12, change long; itudinalgl'q gt? lp ngituqamally Signed andhealggi this "11th day of April 1972.

SEAL) iDWARD M.FLETCHER, JR "Q r 3 ROBERT GOTTSCHALK httesting Officer" y Comissioner of Patents

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US6527156Apr 3, 2001Mar 4, 2003Robbins, Inc.Fastener driving apparatus and method
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US8789735 *Nov 20, 2009Jul 29, 2014Scott David CrawfordFloor stapler shoe
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US20100187282 *Nov 20, 2009Jul 29, 2010Scott David CrawfordFloor Stapler Shoe
WO1989006590A1 *Jan 13, 1989Jul 27, 1989Milton Peter BrowneSurface treating apparatus
WO2001010613A2 *Aug 7, 2000Feb 15, 2001Robbins, Inc.Fastener driving apparatus and method
WO2001010613A3 *Aug 7, 2000Sep 26, 2002Robbins IncFastener driving apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/432, 227/111, 227/7
International ClassificationB27F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27F7/006
European ClassificationB27F7/00D