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Publication numberUS3620420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1971
Filing dateFeb 2, 1970
Priority dateFeb 3, 1969
Also published asCA920555A1, DE2004439A1
Publication numberUS 3620420 A, US 3620420A, US-A-3620420, US3620420 A, US3620420A
InventorsNormos Norbert
Original AssigneeFinanc Pour La Rech Et L Ind S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Containers
US 3620420 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 3,620,420

|72| Inventor Norbert Normos [56] Relerences Cited Comm, UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 9f:- 1?; 1970 1,235,550 s/wn Carmody 222/3865 t d f 19" 2,910,452 2/196! Beckman etalu ZZZ/386.5 x 255 L Financier. Pour h Recherche 3,41 5,425 12/1968 Knight et al. 222/3 86.5 E! Uhldustfle 3,494,513 2/[970 Bayer 222/3865 Paris, France Primary Examiner-Samuel F. Coleman [32] Priority Feb. 3, 1969 Assistant Examiner-Norman L. Stack, Jr. [33] France Attorney-Bacon & Thomas [3! 6,902,36l

n ABSTRACT: The container for a product to be dispensed by a 8 raw pressurized fluid includes a diaphragm of baglike configura- |52| U.S.Cl v t v v t t 222/3865 tion preferably formed of ductile metal and having a rigid I51] lnt.Cl 367d 5/54 base. A hollow, ring or cup slidably mounted within the [50] Field 0! Search i. 222/3865 diaphragm and container has a rounded end wall over which 95 the diaphragm slides as the product is being dispensed.

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H TTOPNE Y5 PAIENTEDunv 15 I97! SHEET 5 OF 5 I!) my IN VE N T01? NORBERT Noe/was H T TOP/YE YS CONTAINERS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to improvements in containers such as tins or drums for dispensing products such as pastes. foams. liquids and other products capable of being extracted from a container under the influence of a pressurized fluid. The invention applies particularly to products in which it is not desirable for the product itself and the pressurized fluid used as the propellant to be brought into contact. This is particularly the case with certain comestibles or alimentary products.

In prior art it is known practice of diaphragns, particularly made of plastics materials. to separate the propellant fluid and the propelled product. but the sirtightness of the materials in use is not always satisfactory, particularly when the diaphragm is deformed and bent during usage. Moreover, operation of this device is often irregular and limited.

It is also known to use metal diaphragm systems which in most cases include wasted or dead space which prevents the use of one part of the interior capacity of the container or tin.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION The aim of the present invention is to improve and render the deformation of the diaphragm gradual and regular between the "full position in which the propellant fluid is compressed and the diaphragm is filled with the product to be propelled. and the "empty" position in which the contents of the diaphragm are emptied as far as possible and the fluid occupies almost the entire capacity of the container or tin. The propellant fluid is very often gaseous under normal temperature and pressure conditions, but liquifles under several ltilograms per square centimeter (usually 3 to 5 Itg./cm.). the pressure which is necessary to propel the product in such containers. For this purpose it is possible to use various gases or gas mixtures which can be liquified under low pressure. such as those known in the trade under the Mark "PREGN" registered by the Company EI du Pont de Nemours.

On the other hand. the present invention aims to eliminate the above-mentioned disadvantages with regard to the use of materials according to prior art. by proposing solutions which are suitable for a wide range of products and which comprise optimum scaling properties and a minimum of dead space in the dispenser.

STATEMENT OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention a device is provided which ensures that the diaphragm is turned down in a regular manner so that in a cylindrical or prismatic container half of the diaphragm located at the bottom of the container is turned gradually into the other half. i.e., that which is located on the side of the closure means which is usually formed by a manual control valve.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention the container or can has a revolving or nonrevolving cylindrical or prismatic sidewall. In addition. it has a base and an upper portion provided with a controllable opening plug such as a valve of any known type. The word "dome" will refer hereinafter to the upper portion of the container surrounding the plug. said plug. the dome. the sidewalls and the base forming a unit which is sealed and resistant to internal pressure.

Inside the surrounding wall thus formed. a flexible diaphragm or inner bag connected by its periphery to the surrounding walls (whether it is the base. the sidewalls. the dome or the plug) makes it possible to separate two spaces, one on the side of the valve intended for the product to be conditioned and propelled. the other intended mainly for the propellant fluid.

In the various embodiments described above. the diaphragm therefore turned between the position "full" defined above. when it is located in the lower half of the can tainer. and the position empty when it is returned into the upper portion of the container. The aim of the device according to the present invention is to ensure the gradual and regular return of the diaphragm from one position to another without causing bending or rupturing which would be harmful to the seal produced between the two spaces defined on either side of the diaphragm. Such ruptures would cause the propellant fluid to enter the product to be propelled which would have a harmful effect on the product and would also in most cases render the propellant device unserviceable. Moreover. this may be limited to a rupture in the varnish or in the protective coating mentioned below which is brought into contact with the product and material forming the diaphragm and has the disadvantages resulting therefrom.

The device according to the present invention essentially compr'ues, in addition to the container and diaphragm. a cyiindrical or prismatic hollow element which is capable of sliding into the container and diaphragm with a translatory movement parallel to the sidewalls of the container. With the exception of clearance and obviously the thickness of the diaphragm, the outer periphery of the cross section of this hollow element coincides with the inner periphery of the cross section of the container. The hollow element will be referred to hereinafter as a "ring or collar" when it is penetrated from end to end and. as a "cup" in the reverse case. The principle feature of this hollow element comprises a rounded edge or lip over which rolls the sheet or film forming the sidewall of the diaphragm which thus passes from the exterior to the interior of the ring or cup or the reverse which ensures a regular and effective return. The choice of material to be used to form the disphragms must be such that in addition to sealing qualities and neutrality with regard to the product to be stored and the propellant fluid. it must be sufficiently flexible so that. in the course of the bearing on the edge or lip of the ring or cup due to pressure and tension of the various elements in use. there is produced the necessary deformation for the bearing to be effected without causing bending when there is contraction and without causing tearing when there is expansion.

The turning of the diaphragm may be effected in two ways according to which the ring or cup is located above the diaphragm. i.c.. on the side of the propelled product or below the d'nphragm, i.e., in the vicinity of the propellant fluid. the gradual action of the fluid and the resistance offered thereto by the diaphragm. and possibly by the eiement and propelled product. must be such that the walls of the diaphragm remain constantly in contact with the edge or lip of the ring or cup at the point of return.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS To assist in a better understanding of the technical features and advantages of the present invention several embodiments will be described. on the condition that they are nonlirnitative with regard to their mode of operation and application. With reference to the drawings:

FIG. 1 schematically represents a longitudinal section of a diaphragm provided with a ring.

FIG. 2 schematically represents a longitudinal section of a diaphragm with its ring accommodated in a case.

FIG. 3 schematically represents a longitudinal section of a container or dispenser having a diaphragm ring. shown in the full FIG. 4 schematically represents the container of FIG. 3 having a diaphragm and ring. shown in an intermediate position.

FIG. 5 schematically represents the same container of FIGS. 3 and 4 having a diaphragm and ring. shown in the empty position.

FIG. 6 schematically represents a longitudinal section of a diaphragm. its lower half being flexible and its upper half rigid. and a ring. the unit being accommodated in a case.

FIG. 7 schematically represents a longitudinal section of a diaphragm such that the seal between said diaphragm and the wall of the container is formed in the lower half FIGS. 8, 9. 10. 11, I2. 13 and I4 schematically represent different modifications of the diaphragm: shown in preceding figures. in axial section.

FIG. is schematically represents a longitudinal section of a container or can provided with a diaphragrns and a cup.

FIG. 16 shows in the lower half a schematic longitudinal section of a cup before the latter is positioned in the container.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the following description and for the purposes of simplification reference will be made to the commonest form of container, i.e., a revolving cylinder having a slightly concave base and a dome in the form of a truncated cone, but it is obvious that devices adapted to correspond to the shapes of other containers, cans, revolving or nonrevolving cylindrical or prismatic bottles may be designed without departing from the scope of the present invention, the base and the dome being of any desired shape.

In FIG. I the sidewall of the diaphragm I is in the form of a cylinder made of a sheet of aluminum or any other suitable material. In this connection it should be mentioned that numerous metals and alloys are suitable. It is generally desirable for the metal sheet in use to be varnished or coated so as to ensure the mutual protection of the metal and the product or the propellant fluid, but it is also possible to design compound diaphragms comprising layers of different materials formed particularly from sheets of metal or associated alloys or films comprising other materials such as polymers or polycondensates. the sheet metal ensuring sealing and solidity, another material ensuring the protection of the metal or preventing contact between said metal and the product contained in the diaphragm. This may be obtained by gluing, by heated or unheated coating, by spraying or some other conventional method. This base of the diaphragm is closed by a relatively rigid base 4 which can be produced, for example, by stamping metal and which assumes a form allowing this base to bear against the dome of the container or can. i.e.. against the upper portion surrounding the valve so that the maximum amount of product is expelled from the pocket.

Inside the diaphragm I is arranged a relatively rigid cylindrical ring 3 the cross section of which is inserted in that of the container, thereby permitting a sliding movement as will be seen in FIGS. 3, 4 and this ring can be made of any suitable in FIG. but its base must be such that, as shown in FIG. I, the lower flexible portion of the wall of the diaphragm falls back inside the ring by bearing at 2 against the rounded lower edge or lip of this ring. It is therefore understood that the diameter of the base 4 of the diaphragm should be such that it can execute a translatory movement inside the ring 3 as will be seen with reference to FIGS. 3. 4 and 5. The unit comprising the diaphragm and the ring is placed in the case 5 such as that shown in FIG. 2. In the present application the word "case" refers to the unfinished casing which will become the body of the container after the dome is formed, i.e.. after the upper portion surrounding the valve 480 is formed. The seal between the diaphragm l and the case 5 can be produced by any known means and particularly be adhesion, for example with the aid of polymers or polycondensates. This seal may likewise be obtained by welding, particularly ultrasonic welding. The upper half 6 of the diaphragm can be broadly attached to the sidewall of the case 5, i.e., until it reaches a height which is approximately equal to half the height of the actual container. Because this upper half of the diaphragm is connected to the case, it is obvious that it can be relatively rigid and not particularly flexible, i.e.. thicker than the lower half of the diaphragm which will have to be turned back as will be explained further When the diaphragm l and the ring 3 are in a position as shown in FIG. 2. the dome of the container may be formed by any known means, as shown in FIG. 3. from the upper cylindrical half of the case such as that shown in FIG. 2.

The opening in the dome is closed by means of a conventional type of valve, and the filling may be effected by all the usual means. For the purposes of simplification. the valve is not shown in detail in any of the drawings.

The filling of the container with propellant fluid may be effected by any known means and particularly by means of an opening produced in the base of the container which is provided for example with a valve. For the purposes of simplification this device has not been shown in the drawings.

When the container is full. as shown in FIG. 3. the base 4 of the diaphragm is positioned in the vicinity of the base of the container 5, the propellant fluid being compressed into the space between these two bases. The lower half of the diaphragm is turned back over part of the ring, as shown in FIG. 3. As the contents of the container is gradually used, the expanding propellant fluid pushes the base 4 upward by a translatory movement, the flexible wall of the diaphragm follows the base 4 by rolling over the lower rounded edge or lip 2 of the ring 3, thereby drawing said ring 3 upwards in a translatory movement.

FIG. 4 shows the unit in an intermediate position and FIG. 5 shows the position corresponding to the emptying of the diaphragm.

In connection with FIG. 5 it is stated that. with the exception of the capacity in the diaphragm l and the ring 3, if the propellant fluid occupies almost the entire capacity of the container 5, the propelled product which could possibly be left in the container would be located between the base 4 of the diaphragm and the dome of the container. It is understood that if the base 4 is of such a shape that it bears closely enough against the interior of the dome. hardly any product will exist in the container. In this position the height of the ring 3 must be appreciabiy equal to that of the diaphragm when the lower half is returned into the upper half, as shown in FIG. 5.

In FIG. 6 is shown a case I0 containing a diaphragm according to the present invention and a ring 9. the upper half 8 of said diaphragm being rigid, thus making it possibie to avoid certain deformation due to the pressure of the propellant fluid.

In FIG. 7 is shown another embodiment in which the diaphragm is twice returned to the full position, i.e., the outer part II of the diaphragm is to be attached to the container to ensure sealing, the ring I2 moving upwards again as well as the base 4. As shown in preceding figures the interior of the diaphragm rolls over the lower half of the ring at I2. When the container is empty the diaphragm is therefore fully returned, i.e., the outer part I 1 remains attached to the lower half of the walls of the container whereas the other half and the base 4 of the diaphragm are moved upwards inside the ring. The upper bend in the diaphragm in a position such as that shown in FIG. 7 must be designed so as to prevent any leakage or mechanical fatigue.

FIG. 8 shows an embodiment wherein the diaphragm with the upper rigid half 1 is positioned inside the container 9 and provided with a ring 8. the dome I0 being attached at the same time as the upper edge of the rigid half of the diaphragm to the upper end of wall 9, thereby ensuring a seal.

In FIG. 9 is shown a container 15 provided with a diaphragm 13 and a ring 14 having the same shape as that shown in FIG. I, the lower edge of the diaphragm. the base I6 of the container and the lower edge of the wall I5 being attached together at the same time.

In the example shown in FIG. I0, the diaphragm I8 and the ring I9 of FIG. 7 are positioned in a container 20, the seal being obtained by gluing together the outer fold of the diaphragm l8 and the lower half of the container 20.

FIG. I I shows a device similar to that in FIG. I0 with a container 23, a diaphragm 2!, a ring 22 and a base 234 which is inserted at 24 into the lower end of the container 23. The lower edge of the container 23 is turned inwardly and up wardly to fasten the lower free edge of the diaphragm 21 and the outer edge of the base 23a in place.

In FIG. 12 a diaphragm 25, reduced in height, is folded outwardly over and attached to the upper edge of the lower half 27 of the container 28 and contains the ring 26. The upper half of the container 28 is then telescoped over the exposed portion of the diaphragm and the upper edge of the lower half 27 and attached thereto by any known method of assembly (gluing, welding inserting), the connection between the upper and lower halves 27 and 28 being located approximately halfway between the base and the dome. The assembling of the container from two halves or "shells" is known practice.

FIG. 13 shows a modification which draws its inspiration from the device in H0. with regard to the fixing at 33 of the edge of the diaphragm 29 and the return folding of the diaphragm into the interior of the lower half or shell 3] of the container. The diaphragm 29 is provided with a ring 30 and the upper half or shell 32 of the container is attached to the lower half 31 by any known means.

FIG. 14 shows a modification which draws its inspiration from the device in FIG. 12; the device comprises half a shell 36 with a base, to the upper edge of which is attached the turned-down (or folded) edge of the diaphragm 34. This unit is positioned in a container 37, the top of which is shaped to produce the dome of the container.

FIG. l5 shows a longitudinal section of a container 40, the base 41 of which is positioned on the wall 42 of the sidewall so as to attach at the same time the edge 43 of the diaphragm 44 and, if necessary, a sealing joint 45. The dome 46 has the opening 47 and the rolled edge 48 necessary for fixing the clo sure member 48a which, as has already been described in connection with other figures, can be a valve of any known type. The base 41 has an opening 49 for filling the container with propellant fluid, said opening being provided with a closure system such as a valve, not shown. The cup 50 essentially comprises a sidewall of generally cylindrical shape having on its upper edge a rounded edge or lip 51 over which the sidewall 52 of the diaphragm is turned. The base 53 of the diaphragm is produced as in preceding examples and is rigid. The cup 50 has a base 54 which can be convex in shape so as to leave a space 55 between the base of the diaphragm 53 and itself for any type of fluid which moreover can be air and which is slowly expanded while the cup and the diaphragm are being assembled. The pressure in this space 55 must be such that it plays only a negligible part in propelling the fluid and in exerting different forces to expel the product through the valve. The propellant fluid is therefore located in the space 56 between the base 41 of the container and the base 54 of the cup.

To prevent the propellant fluid from rising between the sidewall of the cup 50 and the sidewall of the diaphragm it is possible, as shown in FIG. 16, to resort to widening the base of the cup as at 57 which, if it is sufficiently flexible, will ensure a close contact between this widened portion 57 of the cup and the diaphragm 44 by inserting it forcefully into the container and the diaphragm during assembly. In addition, it is possible to provide a joint 58 made of any suitable material which, in FIGS. and 16, is inserted in a groove 59 produced in the base of the cup.

The outer sidewall 60 of the cup can have corrugations, or staggered segments such as those shown at 61 in FIG. 15 so as to reduce, on the one hand. the friction between this wall 60 and the diaphragm 44 while improving the already assured seal at 57 and 58. These staggered segments or corrugations can have various shapes which are integral with the cup or they can be fitted thereon. For example, FIG. 15 shows two toothed segments on the upper half of the cup and three trapezoidal segments on the lower half. These channels and segments can obviously be used on the outer faces of the rings; the inner face 62 of the cup in FIG. 15 is cut away along its entire length thereby reducing friction between the cup and the diaphragm. Such channels or grooves are desirable particularly in all the embodiments shown in H68. 1 to 14.

The cups and diaphragms can. on the other hand, be made of a resistant material which produces a sufficiently low friction to prevent too great a loss of energy in the propellant fluid. To ensure the rolling and return of the diaphragm. the loss of energy can be modified by using lubricants and resins.

in the case of FIG. 15, when the valve 480 is opened, the propellant fluid acts against the base 54 of the cup. and the edge or lip 51 rises thereby by rolling the diaphragm, thus drawing the base 53 upwards and causing the product to be expelled. This arrangement shown in FIG. 15, i.e., using a cup located in the lower space in the container between the diaphragm and base, makes it possible to use materials for the cup which, not being in contact with the product to be conditioned, can be much more varied than in the case of the ring which is in contact with the product.

On the other hand, the cup device makes an initial filling possible either by beginning with the propellant fluid or with the propelled product. It is obvious in other respects that the cup system described in FIG. 15 can be adapted to suit all types of containers such as those schematically represented in the preceding figures, whether they are made in one piece or in several assembled parts. In addition, the parts of the diaphragm which do not have to be rolled and returned can be thicker, cast, welded, or fixed as has been described in connection with preceding examples.

What I claim is:

l. A container having an elongated sidewall, a base and upper end comprising a closure member with a controllable opening for containing and dispensing a product which is expelled through the closure member under the influence of pressurized fluid, said container comprising two spaces separated by a diaphragm sealingly connected to the con tainer, the space adjacent the base in the container being intended for the pressurized fluid, the other space on the side of the closure member being intended for the product, characterized in the diaphragm is provided with a sidewall, generally having the shape corresponding to the inner surface of the sidewall of the container. and a base, said base of the diaphragm being rigid, a hollow element slidably mounted in the container and diaphragm and having a rounded edge over which the sidewall of the diaphragm is rolled by being turned from one face to the other of the hollow element, between a full position where the pressurized fluid is compressed and where the product occupies the interior of the diaphragm and the upper half of the container, and an empty position where the diaphragm is turned upwards, said product being expelled and the pressurized fluid occupying the lower half of the container and the interior of the upturned diaphragm.

2. A container as claimed in claim I wherein a part of the sidewall of the diaphragm is rigid.

3. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the diaphragm is formed by at least one sheet of metal.

4. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the base of the diaphragm has the same shape as the upper end of the container.

5. A container as claimed in claim I wherein the sealing connection between the diaphragm and the container is provided on the sidewall.

6. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the sealing connection between the diaphragm and the container is provided on the periphery of the base of the container.

7. A container as claimed in claim I wherein the sealing connection between the sidewall of the diaphragm and the container is provided on the periphery of the upper half of the container.

8. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the sealing connection between the sidewall of the diaphragm and the container is provided on the periphery of the closure member.

9. A device as claimed in claim I wherein the sealing connection between the sidewall of the diaphragm and the container is provided along the line on which two elements forming the container are assembled.

ID. A container as claimed in claim l where in the said hollow element is in the form of a ring.

ll. A container as claimed in claim 10 wherein the ring is located in the half of the container which is located on the side of the closure member in relation to diaphragm the. said diaphragm being turned from the outer face of the ring onto the inner face of the ring and rolled over the rounded lower edge of the ring.

12. A container as claimed in claim I wherein the hollow element is in the form of a cup having a base.

13. A container as claimed in claim 12 wherein the cup is located in the half of the container on the side of the container base relative to the diaphragm, said base of the cup being on the side of the base in the container, the diaphragm turned from the outer face of the cup towards the inner face by being rolled over the rounded upper edge.

14. A container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the outer face of the sidewall and of the base of the cup is provided with means for ensuring a seal between the cup and the diaphragm to prevent a leakage of pressurized fluid there between.

15. A container as claimed in claim 14 wherein the pressurized fluid is compressed in the space between the base of the cup and the base of the container.

16. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the sidewall of the hollow element is provided with a plurality of faces which are arranged so as to limit friction with the diaphragm or the wall of the container.

17. A container as claimed in claim 1 wherein the width of the rounded edge of the hollow element is greater than the thickness of its sidewall.

i i d i

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4087026 *Oct 6, 1975May 2, 1978Petterson Tor HBarrier package
US4089443 *Dec 6, 1976May 16, 1978Zrinyi Nicolaus HAerosol, spray-dispensing apparatus
US4350272 *Oct 6, 1980Sep 21, 1982Petterson Tor HProduct isolated aerosol container and method of manufacture
US4415099 *Jun 11, 1981Nov 15, 1983Grow Group, Inc.Apparatus for maintaining free movement of a mixing object in a pressurized container
US4951847 *Mar 25, 1988Aug 28, 1990Swiss Aluminium Ltd.Two-chamber compressed-gas pack
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US5303852 *Dec 18, 1992Apr 19, 1994Sunstar Kabushiki KaishaViscous liquid-dispensing container having a resilient follower
US5454486 *Jan 18, 1995Oct 3, 1995Colgate-Palmolive Co.Squeezable dispension container for fluid materials
US5529213 *Apr 6, 1995Jun 25, 1996Colgate-Palmolive CompanySqueezable dispensing container for fluid materials
US6305577 *Sep 13, 1991Oct 23, 2001Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Squeeze dispenser package for viscous products
US6308862 *Apr 27, 1992Oct 30, 2001Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Dispenser package for dual viscous products
US6419129 *Jul 7, 1997Jul 16, 2002Robert Henry AbplanalpFlexible barrier member useful in aerosol dispensers
US7770762 *Feb 11, 2005Aug 10, 2010LablaboDeformable flexible pouch and device for packaging and dispensing fluid products
US20120312839 *May 21, 2012Dec 13, 2012Stehli Jr Charles JFluid dispenser, system and filling process
DE2360319A1 *Dec 4, 1973Jun 5, 1975Tor Harry PettersonBehaelter mit trennwand und verfahren zur herstellung desselben
DE3210777A1 *Mar 24, 1982Nov 25, 1982Coster Tecnologie Speciali SpaAusteilvorrichtung fuer pastenfoermige stoffe, cremen, dickfluessige fluessigkeiten und dergleichen
DE4103529A1 *Feb 6, 1991Aug 13, 1992Man Technologie GmbhCylindrical pressurised container for liq. - has partition-membrane and hollow-cylindrical rolling membrane, with flanged connection
EP0771294A1 *Jul 19, 1995May 7, 1997Robert Henry AbplanalpFlexible barrier member useful in aerosol dispensers
EP1120358A2 *Jan 3, 2001Aug 1, 2001Riso Kagaku CorporationContainer for liquid products
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WO1993014021A1 *Jan 7, 1993Jul 22, 1993David SeidlerSqueeze bottle package
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/386.5
International ClassificationB65D83/42, B05B11/00, B65D83/28, B65D83/58, B65D83/16, B05B9/04, B05B9/047, B65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB05B11/0045, B65D2231/001, B65D83/62
European ClassificationB65D83/62