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Publication numberUS3620896 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1971
Filing dateJul 31, 1968
Priority dateJul 31, 1968
Publication numberUS 3620896 A, US 3620896A, US-A-3620896, US3620896 A, US3620896A
InventorsPaul J Glasgow
Original AssigneeGlasgow Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clamping tape
US 3620896 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Paul .1. Glasgow Woodmere, N.Y.

[2 1] Appl. No. 749,215

[22] Filed July 31, 1968 [45] Patented Nov. 16, 1971 [7 3] Assignee Glasgow Products, Inc.

Woodmen, N.Y.

[54] CLAMPING TAPE 12 Claims, 14 Drawing Figs.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,138,568 11/1938 Brandenberger 156/84 X 2,299,988 10/1942 Irving 156/85 2,942,300 6/1960 Masters 161/214 UX Primary Examiner-William A. Powell Attorney-Stoll and Stoll ABSTRACT: A multilamina tape in which a first lamina has the property of substantial contraction and a second lamina attached thereto has the property of negligible contraction resulting in a coiling of the tape during contraction of the first lamina. The first lamina may be heat-, chemicalor radiation shrinkable. A preferred embodiment employs a linearly prcstretched thermoplastic with a memory for its normal configuration to which it shrinks upon being activated to reach its plastic state with heat. The second lamina is formablc thereby assuming a coiled configuration and may be serrated to provide a controlled direction of coil, ease of coiling due to in creased flexibility in the direction of coiling and transverse rigidity perpendicular to the direction of coiling. Adhesive- -heat, solvent or pressure activatedon the innermost surface of the coiled configuration serves to bond the coil to itself and to items contained thereby to form a permanent wrap or tie.

PATENTEDNUV 18 I97| 3,820,896

1111111111111 1111, III] [Ill/112a [N VE'N T 016 PAUL J- GLASGO W B; A MQJM ATTORNEYS CLAMPING TAPE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1 Field of the Invention Securing devices for securing wire and cable bundles and the like.

2. Description of the Prior Art The necessity for joining together at frequent intervals a varying group of parallel wires has grown with the advent of sophisticated electrical and electronic devices. The more involved the circuitry and the more sensitive the circuit components to esthetics, compactness, and field interactions, the greater has become this need for neat, easily formed harnesses.

The common means for joining wires into bundles in the past have included rudimentary and laborious hand-tying with lacing cord, plastic strap and buckle arrangements and adhesive tapes. To one extent or another, each of the common means has required a manual looping of the string, strap or adhesive tape around the wire bundle, a matter of difficulty particularly in close and delicate quarters.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, the present invention provides a clamping means for circumferentially clamping groups of objects, yet requiring an operation from one side only. The clamping means of the present invention is self-adapting to varying shapes and sizes of members to be clamped.

Briefly, and not by way of limitation, the present invention comprises a tape having at least two laminae of different coefficients of contraction joined to prevent interlamina relative movement during contraction.

A first lamina has the property of extreme contraction in a preferential direction. The second formable lamina will not contract to any meaningful degree. Contraction of the first causes coiling of the composite tape with the first lamina on the interior (smallest radius). The second lamina has serrations to provide rigidity parallel to the serrations and flexible formability normal to the serrations in the lamina plane.

Contraction of the first lamina is caused by selected application of energy sufficient to cause the first lamina to contract and transmit a compressive force on the inner fibers of the second lamina thereby causing both to assume a coiled configuration.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a planview of a fragmentary length of a two laminae clamping tape in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. IA is a cross-sectional view takenacross line lA-lA of FIG. 1 and showing a first form of the invention in which the second lamina has a continuous upper surface for joining to the first lamina.

FIG. 2 is a pictorial view of a group of wires held by a clamping tape in accordance with a second form of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view similar to that of FIG. IA but of a second form of the invention in which the upper surface of the second lamina is serrated in sawtooth fashion.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken across line 4-4 of FIG. 3 showing the upper surface of the formable lamina of the second form of the present invention showing the direction of the compressive forces imparted by the first, shrinkable, lamina.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to that of FIG. 4 showing the upper surface of the formable lamina of a third form of the present invention showing the oblique direction of the serrations and the oblique orientation of the compressive forces upon contraction of the first lamina.

FIG. 6 is a pictorial view of a group of wires held by a clamping tape in accordance with a third form of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view similar to that of FIG. 3 but showing a fourth form of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view similar to that of FIG. 3 but showing a fifth form of the invention.

FIG. 9 is a side view of the clamping tape of FIG. 8 in its clamping configuration.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged plan view of a fragmentary length of clamping tape in accordance with another form of the present invention.

FIG. I1 is a cross-sectional view taken across line I I ll of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional view taken across line 12-12 of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a side view of the clamping tape of FIG. 10 in its clamping configuration.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawing, the clamping tape 10 of the present invention is provided with a first, contractable lamina I2 and a second, formable, lamina 14 joined thereto. In a first form of the invention, as shown in FIG. 3, there are no other operative laminae although various coatings may be applied for protection, identification or adhesion.

Contractable lamina 12 has the property, whether an attribute of its material or an attribute of a previous operation, of rapid contraction under controlled application of energy such as chemical radiation (particle or electromagnetic) or, preferably, thermal. Contraction is essentially linearly of the tape and transverse contraction should be minimal; it could be eliminated or minimized by a previous operation in preparation of this material. An example of such a previous operation is to prestretch the material linearly in the presence of radiation. Examples of materials suitable to the preferred contraction by heat are films of Neoprene, Mylar, Teflon (all trademarks of E. I. duPont de Nemours and Company, the first for a synthetic rubber, the second for a polyester and the third for a tetrafiuoroethylene), Penntube l and II (trademark of Pennsylvania Fluorocarbon Co. Inc. for a fluorinated ethylpropylene), Cryovac (trademark of W. R. Grace & Co. for a polyethylene and polypropolene composition) and Reynolon (a trademark of Reynolds Metal Co. for a preferentially oriented polyvinyl chloride). The application of controlled amounts of heat to the energy level of material plasticity but not to the point at which the material loses its memory for its prestretched dimensions will cause contractable lamina I2 to contract, sometimes as much as 50 to 70 percent of its original stretched dimensions.

Formable lamina 14 has the properties of relatively easy formation to a configuration which it holds without a memory of any prior configuration and of negligible contraction as compared to contractable lamina 12. Examples of materials suitable for formable lamina I4 are thin metals or semirigid plastics such as vinyl, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, styrene, Neoprene, Lexan (a trademark of General Electric Company) and nylon.

Formable lamina 14 may be flat as shown in FIG. 1A or may be provided with a serrated upper surface 14a in which the peaks of the serrations define a substantially planar surface to which contractable lamina I2 is permanently affixed. In the second form of the present invention as shown in FIG. 4, the serrations are transverse of the tape longitude; in the third form of the invention as shown in FIG. 5, the serrations run at an oblique angle from the transverse. The serrations provide a rigidity in a direction parallel to each serration, and a flexibility in a direction perpendicular to each serration, both directions being in the plane of formable lamina I4. The preferred direction of contraction of lamina I2 is properly oriented to always contract perpendicular to the serrations. Accordingly, there is controlled curving or looping during contraction of contractable lamina 12. In the second form of the invention tape I0 is caused to loop spirally about itself as shown in FlG. 2 and extended lengths of the tape will continue to spiral in ever increasing radii with the tape encircling itself repeatedly until exhausted. ln the third form of the invention the tape will loop helically as shown in FIG. 6 rather than assume the spiral of the second form. Extended lengths of the third form of the tape will form a helix substantially coaxial with the members (wires in FIG. 6) to be joined. Top surface of lamina 12 is coated with an adhesive, chemical or thermal activation of which causes it to bond to the surfaces it contacts after the looping has occurred thereby forming a permanent wrap.

Both the second and third forms of the invention are shown to have serrations on upper surface 140 of formable lamina 14 only. In the fifth form of the invention as shown in FIG. 8, formable lamina 14 is shown to have its serrations constitute the entire formable lamina which is therefore sharply corrugated. Such full serrations may run transverse of the tape longitude or angularly with respect thereto; in the coiled showing of the fifth form of the invention in FIG. 9 it is clear that transverse corrugations'have produced the spiral. The form of the invention shown in FIG. 10 utilizes a contractable lamina 12 which is narrower than formable lamina l4 and which rests in a central channel formed in upper surface 14a between shoulders or side serrations 14c which rise slightly above surface 14a. Bottom surface 14b of formable lamina 14 is also serrated. With transverse serrations this form of the invention will form a spiral coil as shown in H0. 13. The overlapping portions of the spiral will tend to engage each other to prevent slipping, lower serrations 14b being exposed to secure shoulders 140.

The fourth form of the invention shown in FIG. 7 is substantially similar to the preceding forms of the invention, having contractable lamina 12 and formable lamina 14. Additionally, the fourth form of the invention is provided with a third lamina having the general properties of the formable (second) lamina but with an even smaller rate of contraction.

Joining of the various laminae may be such means as adhesives, rivets, or welding of the impact, ultrasonic or solvent varieties.

While the foregoing is illustrative of preferred embodiments and forms of the invention, it is clear and other forms and embodiments may be had within the broad teaching of the disclosure and the broad scope of the appended claims. For example, the third lamina has been shown in FIG. 7 to be a bottom layer to the preceding forms of the invention. Clearly, the third lamina may be applied to the fifth form of the invention in FIG. 8 and thereby present a smooth lower surface.

What is claimed is:

l. A multilamina tape, comprising:

a. at least two strips which are laminated together,

b. one of said strips being linearly contractable relative to the other strip,

c. to impress a curved form upon both strips,

d. said other strip being provided with a continuum of parallel serrations,

e. to control the direction of curvature of said tape.

2. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 1, wherein a. said continuum of parallel serrations are disposed transversely of the tape longitude.

3. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 1, wherein:

a. said continuum of parallel serrations arc angularly disposed with respect to the tape longitude.

4. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim I, wherein:

a. the uppermost portions of the serrations continuum defines a substantially planar surface to which the linearly contractable strip is joined,

b. to prevent interlamina movement.

5. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 4, wherein:

a. said laminae are joined by ultrasonic welding.

6. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 4, wherein:

a. said laminae are joined by solvent welding.

7. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 4, wherein:

a. said laminae are joined by impact welding.

8. A multil amina tape in accordance with claim 4, wherein: a. said laminae are oined by riveting.

9. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 1, wherein:

a. the voids formed by said continuum of serrations are filled with an adhesive,

b. which is squeezed from said voids upon coiling of said tape to coat adjacent surfaces.

10. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 9,

wherein:

a. said adhesive is thermally activated. 11. A multilamina tape in accordance with claim 9, wherein:

a. said adhesive is air-setting.

12. A multilamina tape, comprising:

a. at least two strips which are laminated together,

b. one of said strips being linearly contractable relative to the other strip,

c. to impress a curved form upon both strips,

d. said other strip being provided with a serrated exposed surface,

e. to provide locking teeth which prevent a coil from opening.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/167, 156/85, 264/342.00R, 428/346, 24/16.0PB, 174/DIG.800, 428/169
International ClassificationB65D63/10, B29C61/06, B29C61/10
Cooperative ClassificationB29L2031/775, B29C61/0616, Y10S174/08, B65D63/10, B29C61/10
European ClassificationB29C61/06B2, B29C61/10, B65D63/10