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Publication numberUS3621592 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1971
Filing dateAug 21, 1970
Priority dateAug 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3621592 A, US 3621592A, US-A-3621592, US3621592 A, US3621592A
InventorsGoldmerstein Isaac
Original AssigneeGoldmerstein Isaac
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rubber with built-in boot jack
US 3621592 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 23, 1971 GouDMERs-rElN RUBBER WITH BUILT-IN BOOT JACK 2 ShQets-Shoot l Filed Aug. 21, 1970 ISAAC GOLDMERSTEIN A 'ffm/mm,

NOV 23, 1971 l. GOLDMERSTEIN 3,621,591

RUBBER WITH BUILT-IN BOOT JACK Filed Aug. 21. 1970 United States Patent -Ofee 3,021,592 Patented Nov. 23, 11971 U.S. Cl. 36-2.S lRY 5 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCIJUSUIRE A foot rubber or boot is provided with an elongated pull tab extending rearwardly from the heel portion to permit the toe of the other foot to secure this tab to the iloor while lifting upon the shoe to remove the heel of the shoe from the heel portion of the rubber. The heel portion of the rubber is preferably provided with a liner or other rigid material adhered to the. inside of the normal flexible rubber material to render the heel portion rigid and stiff to facilitate the removal of the shoe but also the easy insertion of the heel of the shoe into the rubber while in a standing position and without having to pull the rubber over the shoe from a sitting position. The pull tab can be again in the form of a vertically-extending loop which when collapsed is flattened upon the oor by the toe and which when rubber is being Worn serve as a storage for a toe ller body which can be used in the toe of the shoe to render the rubber tight upon the foot on certain occasions. For a further form of the invention a pull tab is anchored to the lower portion of the heel and extends upwardly over the outer surface of the heel portion and is retained by a transversely-extending elastic loop leaving the upper end of the tab accessible for placing the foot over the same and for lowering the pull tab to the oor to hold the rubber by the pull tab as the shoe is lifted from the rubber.

This invention relates to rubbers and boots and more particularly to built-in boot jack means for the removal of the rubber or boot from the shoe.

It is the principal object of the present invention to provide a simple built-in boot jack means for rubbers or boots to which a foot can be applied for the purpose of removing the rubber or boot from the shoe of the wearer and to render it much easier and quicker to take olf rubbers and boots.

It is another object of the invention to provide in foot rubbers a stilfe-ning lining in the heel portion so as t0 permit the insertion of the foot into the rubber while the rubber is on the floor and without the need of pulling rubbers on to the shoe but rather to force the shoe and foot into the rubber while the rubber is on the floor.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a rubber which can be put on the foot without using the hands and with less time than is usually used in removing a rubber from the foot, the timel required being less than ten seconds.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a rubber with a reinforcement of the heels providing for a stiff rubber heel portion which will facilitate the forcing of the foot into the rubber and the removal of the rubber from the shoe.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a rubber that can be readily placed on the shoe by forcing the shoe into the rubber while the rubber is on the floor and also wherein the rubber can be readily and easily removed from the shoe in which provision is provided, if the user desires the rubber to be tight upon the foot in a small toe filler that can be normally carried by the pull tab but removable therefrom can be inserted into the toe of the rubber to cause the rubber to have a tight lit upon the shoe.

Other objects of the invention is to provide a rubber or boot having the above objects in mind, which is a simple construction, easy to manufacture, adds to the life of the rubber or boot, eicient and effective in use.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. l is a perspective View of rubber foot wear embodying the features of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of one of the rubbers with the heel portion broken away to show the construction thereof.

IFIG. 3 is a top plan view of the rubber.

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view thereof.

FIG. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the full rubber as viewed on line 5--5 of FIG. 3l.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the rigid liner for the heel removed from the rubber.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a rubber employing a toe ller adapted to be carried at the rear thereof by the rubber pulling tab.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of toe portion of the rubber as viewed on line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the toe ller removed from the rubber.

lFIG. l0 is a rear perspective View of the rubber showing the manner in which the toe iller is carried by the loop pull tab of the rubber in its out-of-use position.

FIG. 11 is a longitudinal sectional view of the heel portion of the rubber with the toe ller removed from the loop tab and with the foot being applied to the loop for the ller to remove the rubber from a heel of a shoe.

FIG. l2 is a rear and side perspective view of a further modified form of the invention in which the pull tab is retained under a transversely-extending stretchable or elastic strap portion.

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the heel portion of FIG. 12 with illustration being made as to the manner in which the pull tab is rested upon the floor surface and the transverse strap is stretched to effect the pulling of the rubber from the shoe.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of' a pair of lightweight overshoes or boots having a pull tab of FIG. 12 located on the inner side of the boot and normally retained by a stretch loop, the stretch loop being stretched as the foot is applied to the tab and the shoe lifted from the boot, or the tab being removed from the loop to permit stepping upon more of the tab.

Referring now particularly to FIGS. 1 to 6, there is shown a pair of rubbers 1S, 16 made of ordinary flexible or stretch rubber into which a shoe 17 is extended when the rubber is worn which has a toe portion 18 and a drop heel portion 19. An integrally-formed pull tab 21 extends rearwardly from the heel portion and is of such length, as illustrated in FIG. l, that the toe of the other foot can be applied to this tab and upon effecting the lifting action as illustrated in both FIGS. 1 and 2 of the shoe, the shoe will be lifted out of the rubber in a matter of seconds and the rubber readily made free of the foot.

The toe portion 18 is preferably formed without the usual forward tongue so as to facilitate the insertion of the foot into the rubber. The usual tongue of the rubber is not needed for the pulling of the rubber on or off the shoe. In order to make easy the further insertion of the foot into the rubber, the heel portion is provided with a rigid or stiff liner 22 that lines the heel portion and gives to the same rigidity not provided by the rubber itself. The rigid liner will make the heel portion of the rubber self-supporting when adhered or stitched to the inner wall of the heel portion so that the foot when placed in the toe portion of the rubber 18 can easily have the heel of the shoe of the wearer extended or slid downwardly into the heel portion of the rubber. In this manner, the rubber is made such that it cannot only be easily placed upon the shoe by the wearer from the full standing position, thereby eliminiating the need for sitting down when applying the rubber to the shoe, but also permits easy sliding of the heed out of the heel portion as shown in FIG. 2, when the pull tab 21 is stepped upon to effect pulling of the rubber from the shoe.

This piece 22 can be sewn into the heel portion. The liner is preferably made from plastic material which is much more rigid than the heel rubber so that the heel portion 19 when the liner is in place will be held verticallyextended will become rigid. This renders the rubber heel portion self-supporting and facilitates greatly the insertion thereinto and removal of the shoe heel therefrom. Thus, the rigid liner 22 not only facilitates the placing of the rubber over the shoe heel but helps to permit the easy detachment of the heel portion from the shoe heel when the pull tab 21 is stepped upon and the rubber held in place upon the floor as the heel of the shoe is lifted.

Liner 22 has the shape of the heel and is flanged or flared at its top as indicated at 23 to overlie the upper edge of the heel portion 19 of the rubber. This liner is of such size, or can be cut to such size as to lay fully within a depressed heel sole 24 with its forward edges 25 and 26 terminating at the forward end of the heel depression and these forward portions 25 and 26 are preferably tapered to fit clearly and to eliminate any edge obstruction when stepping into the shoe or upon removing the rubber from the shoe. The height of the liner 22 is the height of the heel portion 19 so that its daring 23 lies over the upper edge of the heel portion. The liner not only can be secured by cementing the same to the inner face of the heel portion but also by stitching such as indicated at 27 just beneath the flaring 23 and around the full extent of the liner.

While these rubbers have been described for the provision of a liner 22, or 34, it should be understood that this liner effect can be provided in the heel by a more solid layer of material molded into the heel portion or by a coating of rigid plastic material sprayed into the inside of the rubber and upon hardening serving to provide the rigidity that is needed for the proper use of the rubber with the foot for these purposes of placing the rubber upon the foot and for the removal of the same. Also, the heel portion of the rubber can be made itself of any composition of material that would make it rigid and surfaced to permit easy sliding of the heel of the shoe thereover upon insertion and removal thereof.

Referring now to FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10, there is shown a rubber 31 constructed according to another form of the invention which has a toe portion 32 and a heel portion 33. Within the heel portion is a liner 34 of rigid material serving to support the rubber heel portion 33. On the rear of the heel portion 33, there is a pull loop 36 which can be attened as shown in FIG. 1l to serve as a tab that can be stepped on by the other and which serves as a storage device for a solid toe filler 37 that can be put in the toe of a shoe as illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 so that the rubber while being cut loose to render the rubber more easy t put on and remove can be made more tight by the toe filler 37. This toe filler is preferably convexly curved on its face to conform with the toe of the rubber and as indicated at 38 and is inwardly or concavely curved on its inner face 39 to accommodate the toe of the shoe. When it is desired to have the rubbers tight upon the foot for long wear or wear in mud or deep snow, this toe filler 37 can ybe used. At other times when the rubber may soon be removed and it is not necessary to have tight wear of the rubber, this filler 37 is stored in the elastic pull loop 36 that can be stretched to easily accommodate the toe filler. As best seen in FIG. l0, the toe filler is put within the loop 36 so that its shoe toe face 39 is fiush against the rounded exterior face of the heel portion 33 of the rubber.

Referring now to FIGS. 12, and 13, a rubber 41 has a heel portion 42 to which a pull tab 43 is molded at the base of the heel portion and extends normally upwardly therefrom through an elastic loop 44 extended across the rear of the heel portion and providing for an upper flexible end 45 which can be reached by the toe of another rubber and pulled downwardly as shown in FIG. 13 with the elastic loop 44 stretching and the heel portion pulled rearwardly to release the heel of the shoe from the rubber heel portion 42. Upon release of the tab 43 the stretched elastic 44 will return the pull tab 43 to its normal flush engagement with the rear of the heel portion and out of the way. An advantage of this tab is that it does not interfere with walking and is automatically held ush upon the heel portion of the rubber when not being used.

In FIG. 14, there is shown flexible cover boot or overshoe provided with a similar pull tab to that of FIGS. 13 and 14 which instead of being located on the rear of the heel portion is located on the side of the boot as indicated by 51. This tab 51 is molded or adhered to the side of the boot 52 and its end extends upwardly through an elastic loop 53 to render adjustable its upper end 54. The toe of the other foot can readily step upon the end 54 and the elastic loop 53 drawn to the floor with the stretching of the loop 53 so that the heel of the boot is held down while the shoe is being lifted from the boot. It should be understood that the tab 51 can be removed also with a greater pulling upward by simply withdrawing the end of the tab 54 from the end of the loop 53 as illustrated. There has been provided rubbers and boots with built-in boot jack means to which a foot can be readily applied in effecting the pulling of the shoe from the rubber, the rubber being sustained upon the floor or ground by the foot pressing against a heel tab carried on the heel portion of the rubber or boot.

It should also be understood that by the provision of a rigid liner filling the heel that the action of pulling the rubber or boot can be more easily effected since the shoe heel can slide easily over the heel portion of the rubber. And that also the provision of this relatively rigid liner that the shoe heel can be extended into the rubber without the need for pulling the rubber over the shoe and While in a standing position with the rubber being kept flat upon the floor.

What is claimed is:

1. A rubber boot or the like to provide a covering for shoes comprising a toe portion and a heel portion, a pull tab on the heel portion comprising a collapsible loop adapted to be stepped upon by the toe of the other foot and a toe filler conforming in shape generally to the interior of the toe of the rubber and to the toe of a shoe, said filler being adapted to be stored through the loop tab puller, one of its faces conforming generally to the contour of the rear surface of the heel portion.

2. A rubber boot or the like serving to provide a covering for shoes comprising a toe portion and a heel portion, a pull tab secured to the bottom of the heel portion and extending upwardly over the heel portion, means associated with the heel portion and the tab to hold the tab in its vertically-extended position upwardly over the heel portion, said tab having an upper end engageable by the toe of the shoe of the other foot and being bendable downwardly when the other foot is applied to the upper end of the tab to substantially extend the tab and provide a good grip of the toe of the other shoe thereupon and said associated means serving to automatically return the tab to its position over the heel when the other shoe is removed from the tab.

3. A rubber boot or the like serving to provide a covering for a shoe as defined in claim 2 and said associated means comprising a transversely extending elastic loop surrounding the tab, said loop being stretchable.

4. A rubber boot or the like serving to provide a covering for a shoe as dened in claim 1 and a rigid liner conforming in shape to the interior of the face of the heel portion and secured thereto, said liner being of relatively rigid sheet material to stiifeu the rubber heel portion.

5. A rubber boot or the like serving to provide a covering for a shoe as defined in claim 4 and said liner being ared outwardly and of a height adapted to permit the flaring of the liner and to extend over the upper edge of the heel portion, the aring serving to facilitate the insertion of the heel of the shoe into the heel portion of the rubber boot or lthe like.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,283,423 1l/1966 Schovec 36-2.5 RY 2,088,976 8/1937 Resnik 36-2.5 RY 2,188,603 1/1940 Hamalainen 36-2.5 RY

10 PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4450634 *Oct 12, 1982May 29, 1984Michael BellBoots with quick release means
US5056240 *May 22, 1989Oct 15, 1991Sherrill William TOvershoes for protecting clean floors from soiled shoes or boots
US5813149 *Nov 21, 1996Sep 29, 1998`Totes`, IncorporatedBoot with rear expansion flap
US5842290 *Apr 14, 1997Dec 1, 1998Mills; James DouglasStep-in shoe covers
US6205686 *Jul 22, 1999Mar 27, 2001Merwyn C. DavisFootwear attachment
US6360456 *Mar 20, 2001Mar 26, 2002Merwyn C. DavisFootwear attachment
US6578288 *Jun 29, 2001Jun 17, 2003Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear
US6874255Apr 3, 2003Apr 5, 2005Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear
US7685747 *Mar 30, 2010Hatchbacks, Inc.Footwear architecture(s) and associated closure systems
US8225529Jul 24, 2012Suzanne SimmsOvershoe for athletic shoes
US8844164 *Aug 23, 2012Sep 30, 20149225-6619 Quebec Inc.Foldable protective overshoe and method of manufacturing
US20040049945 *Apr 3, 2003Mar 18, 2004Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear
US20060037217 *Jul 25, 2005Feb 23, 2006Noam BernsteinSide entry footwear and methods of making
US20070186441 *Feb 13, 2006Aug 16, 2007Chen Stephen LDevice and method for shoe covering
US20080313929 *Jun 25, 2007Dec 25, 2008David HoytStep-in shoe with strap
US20090235556 *Mar 20, 2009Sep 24, 2009Nicole Rose ReidFootwear Cover
US20100018081 *Jan 28, 2010Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Heel accessory
US20100077638 *Sep 29, 2008Apr 1, 2010Suzanne SimmsOvershoe for athletic shoes
US20110192055 *Aug 11, 2011Olenicoff Kim LReinforcement device for boots
US20130047460 *Feb 28, 2013Zain TurnerFoldable protective overshoe and method of manufacturing
US20130055589 *Mar 7, 2013David LombardiProtective aquatic/bodysurfing shoe
US20150335101 *May 21, 2014Nov 26, 2015Ariat International, Inc.Boots with spur stability system
DE29709854U1 *Jun 6, 1997Aug 28, 1997Koch Gmbh & Co Geb‹berschuh
WO1996015691A1 *Nov 22, 1995May 30, 1996Taylor Haasz Clive NealOvershoes
WO2001052677A1 *Jan 15, 2001Jul 26, 2001Jacques MoriceShoe cover for covering the sole and at least part of the upper of a shoe
WO2010036663A1 *Sep 22, 2009Apr 1, 2010Suzanne SimmsOvershoe for athletic shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/138
International ClassificationA43B11/00, A43B3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/16, A43B11/00
European ClassificationA43B11/00, A43B3/16