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Publication numberUS3621845 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1971
Filing dateMay 14, 1969
Priority dateMay 14, 1969
Publication numberUS 3621845 A, US 3621845A, US-A-3621845, US3621845 A, US3621845A
InventorsDennis G Oates
Original AssigneeDennis G Oates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sphygmomanometer
US 3621845 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 23, 1971 QATES SPHYGMOMANOMETER 3 Sheets-Shout 1 Filed May 14, 1969 /NVEN 1'02. DENNIS 0/1 T E5 (1420 rHfesdOwonlf/es D. G. OATES SPHYGMOMANOMETER Nov. 23, ,1971

3 Sheets-Shoot Filed May 14, 1969 /N v- TOE. DENNIS 6. 0A T55 C A 20 rHfesfn/e'omms H/sA T TOEA/E Y5 D. G. OATES SPHYGMOMANOMETER Nov. 23, 1971 I5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 14, 1969 by VENTOE. DEA/ms 6'. 0/; ms

6 E H W QM m KA i mH m C United States Patent M 3,621,845 SPHYGMOMANOMETER Dennis G. Oates, 250 Darragh St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15213 Filed May 14, 1969, Ser. No. 824,593 Int. Cl. A611) 5/02 US. Cl. 128-2.05 S 13 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A sphygmomanometer having a constriction blood pressure cuff with an inflatable portion having a built-in stethoscope audio pickup. A single transmission duct or tube is cooperatively connected to the inflatable portion of the cuff and the stethoscope audio pickup such that pneumatic pressure may be supplied to the inflatable interior of the cuff through the transmission duct while at the same time sound is transmitted from the audio pickup through the same transmission duct to the ear of an operator. A housing is also provided to automatically retract the transmission duct into the housing for convenient storage.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Blood pressure measurements are commonly obtained by the use of a stethoscope in combination with a blood pressure cuff in order to monitor the Korotkows sounds for determination of the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. This conventional procedure is thoroughly discussed in US. Pat. 3,416,516 and the disclosure therein is incorporated herein by reference as a teaching for the proper method of measuring blood pressure.

The conventional blood pressure cuff transducer and blood pressure cuff presently enjoying widely accepted use have inherent problems and complication when stethoscopes are employed in combination with the blood pressure cuff.

The first problem encountered by the physician generally inVOlVes the waste of vital minutes in the untanglement of the stethoscope and blood pressure cuff transmission lines and components.

The normal blood pressure cuff is provided with at least two flexible tubes of considerable length which extend therefrom to connect to a manometer and a pneumatic bulb pump respectively. Another flexible tube is provided for the stethoscope which connects a stethoscope audio pickup, which is held against the patients arm by the blood pressure cuff secured therearound, and extends a considerable length to connect to the stethoscope earpiece at the other end.

These implements are generally stored together on a shelf or the like, and readily become entangled and intertwined with each other, thereby leaving an unsightly mess and requiring the use of precious moments for the untanglement thereof while a patients life may be in jeopardy.

Other complications arise when the combination is put to actual use. For example, in emergencies or in preparation of a patient for surgery, the stethoscope and blood pressure cuff are secured to the patients arm in the prescribed manner and a mask is placed over the patients face to administer the required oxygen or other prescribed gases such as halothane or nitrous oxide. The physician must hold the chin of the patient up to prevent the patients tongue from blocking off the trachea and at the same time he is required to use the opposite hand to pump up the blood pressure cuff. The physician then meets another predicament while carrying out these procedures in that he is often required to assist patient breathing by the squeezing of a flexible sack or bag in order to admin- 3,621,845 Patented Nov. 23, 1971 ister the proper amounts of the gas to the patient when the patient is unable to breathe on his own. Because of this, the physician cannot complete the measurement of the patients blood pressure and thereby has no means of determining whether he has administered too much of the gas, such that he has placed the atient into shock or cardiac arrest. Thus it is extremely important that the physician have blood pressure readings from the very beginning of the procedure and that he further have his hands free to accomplish other required procedures.

While the physician is assisting the patients breathing by squeezing the flexible sack, a period of three to four minutes elapses wherein the blood pressure is not being taken. The physician may then find that the patients breathing must be further assisted by intubation whereby a laryngoscope is placed in the patients mouth and extends down the throat of the patient with a tube attached thereto to forceably provide the gas directly to the lungs. As previously pointed out, since the physician has no blood pressure reading as of yet, he has no means of determining whether he is administering excessive gases to the patient such that he is placing him into shock or cardiac arrest.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is the principal object of the present invention to provide a sphygmomanometer or combination blood pressure cuff and transducer which does not become entangled and is easy to apply and further permits the physician to measure the patients blood pressure while also permitting him to carry on other required functions.

The sphygmomanometer of the present invention comprises a constriction blood pressure cuff having an inflatable portion with means to secure it about a portion of the human body. A stethoscope audio pickup is secured to the cuff and consists of a transducer body having a concavity therein to receive sound transmissions from the cavity opening. A connection duct connects the audio pickup cavity to a stethoscope earpiece which has at least one ear terminus such that the connection duct together with the cavity and the earpiece provides a sound transmission duct for the transmission of sound from the opening of the cavity to the ear of an operator.

A passage means pneumatically connects the sound transmission duct with the interior of the inflatable portion of the blood pressure cuff. A diaphragm means is mounted in the sound transmission duct to permit the maintenance of a pneumatic pressure in the inflatable portion of the cuff while at the same time, permitting sound transmission through the duct to the operators ear. An inflating means and manometer means are connected to the sound transmission duct intermediate the diaphragm means and the cuff end termination of the sound transmission duct to pueurnatically inflate and deflate the blood pressure cuff and to indicate the pneumatic pressure retained therein respectively.

In this manner, only one transmission tube is required to extend from the blood pressure cuff in order to simultaneously supply pneumatic pressure to the inflatable portion of the cuff and sound transmission to the ear of the operator as the pneumatic inflation means and the manometer may both have throughway passages extending freely or unobstructed therethrough such that they are connected in series directly in the sound transmission duct.

If one does not desire the inflation means and the manometer means to be placed in the same single line, other extension lines as required may be led from the single sound transmission duct to other removed areas as required.

The sphygmomanometer of the present invention is further characterized in that the diaphragm means preferably consists of two spaced sound transmission diaphragms pneumatically blocking the sound transmission duct adjacent its opposite end. A second sound transmission daphragm means pneumatically sealing the sound transmission duct between each ear terminus of the stethoscope earpiece and the adjacent of the two aforementioned spaced diaphragms is also preferably provided as further novelty as hereinafter explained.

The present invention is further characterized in that a check valve may be provided in the sound transmission duct between the diaphragm means sealing the ear terminus of the stethoscope earpiece and the next adjacent diaphragm sealing the sound transmission duct. In this manner, a safety precaution is provided in case the latter mentioned diaphragm should happen to burst under pressure. The diaphragm most closely adjacent the ear terminus of the earpiece prevents the sudden impact of the gaseous pressure escaping, from injuring the ear of the operator and the check valve is operable to exhaust this gas under pressure from within the duct to the exterior such that a very small pressure will be actually applied to the diaphragm most adjacent the ear terminus of the stethoscope earpiece in order to prevent it from also bursting. When the earpiece is provided with two car termini, then of course, one or two of the latter mentioned safety diaphragms may be employed such that both ear termini will always be pressure sealed if the main pressure diaphragm should ever burst under pressure.

Although a sphygmomanometer employing a single transmission duct for the passage of pneumatic pressure and sounds has been suggested in the prior art, they are completely inadequate if not altogether incapable of serving the purpose intended. For example, one known apparatus requires that the stethoscope sound pickup or transducer be mechanically forced against the patients arm to function and furthermore, provides no pneumatic sealing of the stethoscope transducer opening to the body whereby either characteristic taken alone or together prevents reliable readings. In such prior art devices a falsely high diastolic reading will be obtained, that is, it is the mechanical pressure of application which will cut off the artery circulation rather than the pneumatic pressure retained within the device.

The sphygmomanometer of the present invention is further characterized by a housing wherein a tube retraction means is mounted to receive a flexible portion of the connection duct between the stethoscope earpiece and the blood pressure cuff to permit withdrawal of a desired length of the flexible duct from the housing and automatic retraction thereof upon the actuation of a release such as might be actuated by a light tug on the flexible tubing or duct. Two of these tube retraction means may be provided within the same housing so that the stethoscope earpiece may be retracted toward the housing on one retraction means and the blood pressure cuff may be retracted toward the housing on the other retraction means.

Thus, by this means, there is no problem as experienced by the prior art of interentanglement of the stethoscope and blood pressure cuff lead lines which are neatly stored or coiled within the housing.

This may be further characterized by the provision of a foot-operated air pump for the inflation means to inflate the blood pressure cuff. This pump preferably is provided with a flexible tube which also leads to the same housing and is connected therein to the sound transmission duct which leads to the earpiece and blood pressure cuff at opposite ends. This foot operated pump thereby permits the physician to have another free hand for other required functions which is not permitted by the conventional hand-operated bulb pump. The pump, like the conventional hand-operated bulb pump, is provided with a pneumatic release to permit controlled deflation of the pneumatic cuff. However, the foot-operated pump of the present invention provides a pneumatic release which is also foot-operated.

The present invention is further characterized in that the manometer is mounted in the aforementioned housing such that it may be viewed exteriorly thereof.

The present invention thus provides a storage unit which prevents entanglement of flexible connection ducts as experienced in the prior art thereby saving precious time which may even be required to save the life of a patient.

Other objects and advantages appear hereinafter in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show, for the purpose of exemplification without limiting the invention or the claims thereto, certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1a is a front view in partial section illustrating one embodiment of a stethoscope earpiece of the present invention.

FIG. lb is a top view of a hand-operated pneumatic pump and manometer combination for use in combination with the earpiece illustrated in FIG. 1a.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the stethoscope earpiece shown in FIG. la as taken along section line 22.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional elevation view of one embodiment of the blood pressure cuff of the present invention which may be used in combination with the structures of FIGS. la and lb.

.FIG. 4 is a cross sectional elevation view taken along line 44 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view in front elevation illustrating one embodiment of the housing interior of the present invention for the storage of interconnecting flexible tubing of the structures of FIGS. 10, 1b, 3 and 4 or the like.

FIG. 6 is a view and front elevation of the closed housing illustrated in FIG. 5

FIG. 7a is a plan view of a foot-operated pneumatic pump illustrating another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7b is a view in front elevation of the foot-operated pump shown in FIG. 7a.

Referring to FIG. la, the stethoscope earpiece 1 is provided with two sound transmission tubes 2 which are slightly flexible to permit them to be spread apart for insertion of the ear terminus pieces 3 in the operators ear.

The ear terminus pieces 3 are threadably secured to the ends of tubes 2 as indicated at 4.

Each ear terminus piece 3 is provided with an internal annular shoulder 5 which seats its respective sound transmission diaphragm 6. Thus, when each ear terminus 3 is threadably secured on its respective end of the tubes 2, the annular abutment face 7 of the tube ends engages the diaphragms 6 and firmly maintains them in seated engagement with annular shoulders 5.

Each ear terminus 3 is provided with an opening 8 therethrough to permit transmission of sound to the operators ear.

The opposite ends of the semiflexible tubes 2 are snugly engaged in the bore 10 of the T body or member 11.

The base 12 of member 11 extends downwardly and is provided with a nipple 13 at its lower end to securely engage a flexible tube 14 of rubber or plastic thereover.

When the stethoscope earpiece 1 is used in actual practice, flexible tube 14 will be provided with an internal pneumatic pressure equal to that contained within an associated inflatable pouch of a blood pressure cuff. Therefore a diaphragm 15 is provided to pneumatically seal off the internal sound transmission duct of the earpiece 1 as provided by tubes 2 and bore 10, from the sound transmission duct provided by the internal passage of flexible tube 14.

Diaphragm 15 is seated on annular shoulder 16 of coupling 17 which is threadably engaged with the base portion 12 of the T coupling member 11. The abutting annular end 18 of base portion 12 engages the diaphragm to seat the same firmly in annular shoulder 16.

Thus, if diaphragm 15 should ever give way or burst under pressure, diaphragms 6 in each ear terminus 3 will prevent injury to the operators ear.

As an additional safety factor, a one-way or check valve 20 is provided in the upper surface 21 of T member 11 as best illustrated in FIGS. 1a and 2. Valve 20 consists of an annular opening 22 interrupted by the Y-shaped web member 23 having a central hub with central opening 24 theretbrough.

The disc-shape rubber flap or check valve 25 is loosely seated on annular shoulder or seat 26 and is provided with a central downwardly depending stem 29 which is received in hub bore 24 and provide with the mushroom tip 27 to prevent accidental removal of stem 29 from hub 'bore 24. Thus the disc-shape flexible valve member 25 is centrally secured to the T member 11 and permits the exhaust of gas under pres-sure from within passage to the exterior should diaphragm burst under pressure thereby greatly reducing the escaping pneumatic pressure which might otherwise be applied to diaphragms 6.

The valve member has been removed from FIG. 2 to permit unobstructed viewing of the Y-shapd web member 23. However, the periphery of the valve member 25 is outlined with a broken line to illustrate the periphery engagement thereof on seat 26.

Three-way valve 30 is provided in stem 12 of the T member 11 and may be manipulated by handle 31 to provide a clear sound transmission passage from tube 14 to passage or bore 10 or from passage 32, which extends from member 12 at 90 from the passage provided by tube 14, to passage or bore 10.

Bore 32 is defined by tube extension or nipple 33 which permits the attachment of another flexible transmission duct or tube (not shown) for the use of a second stethoscope pickup such as might be used as a periocardial stethoscope. Thus, the operator may readily switch between the stethoscope secured in a blood pressure cuff and fed by tube 14 to a second stethoscope pick-up which would be secured by another flexible tube to nipple 33.

Referring to FIG. lb, a hand-operated bulb pump 34 is provided with a one-way inlet or check valve 35 and a one-way outlet or check valve provided within the annular housing 36 which leads to a passage or transmission duct through attached manometer 37 flexible tube or duct 38 to the T coupling 39.

Manometer 37 is of the anaroid type having a meter face 40 which indicates pressure in millimeters of mercury. Manometer 37 thereby measures the air pressure retained within the transmission duct provided by tubes 38, 14 (which leads to the stethoscope earpiece), tube 41 which leads to a blood pressure cuff transducer and inflation pouch to be discussed hereinafter, and the T coupling 39.

Knurled knob 42 is provided as a release to permit controllable deflation of a blood pressure inflation pouch via tubes 41 and 38.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the blood pressure cuff 45 per se is generally of the conventional type and is provided with an inflatable bladder or portion 46 which connects with the transmission duct 47, which is provided by flexible tubing 41 and the rigid plastic tube 48, via passage 50 through the stethoscope audio pickup or transducer body 51 as best illustrated in FIG. 4.

The transducer body 51 is preferably molded as a unitary member of a substance such as rubber such that the member is pliable and flexible. The member is arcuately curved to define substantially parallel concave and convex exterior surfaces 52 and 53, respectively. A cavity '54 which opens to the concave surface 52 is formed in the member 51 and disposed centrally therein and is elongated in the direction normal to the axis of curvature of surfaces 52 and 53.

The opening of cavity 54 to surface 52 constitutes the end of the sound transmission duct which begins at the ear termini 3 of the earpiece 2 shown in FIG. 1a.

Cavity 54 is pneumatically sealed from the exterior ofthe blood pressure cuff 45 by means of the inflatable pouch wall 55 which together with pouch wall 56 of the blood pressure cuff 45 defines the inflatable portion 46. The flexible wall 55 also provides a sound transmission diaphragm means for the transmission of sound from the exterior of wall 55 to the interior of cavity 54 for transmission to the ear of an operator. The transducer member 51 has its concave cylindrical surface 52 glued or otherwise secured to the back surface of flexible wall 55.

The arrangement shown thus permits the use of the same passage 47 for the transmission of sound while employing the same for inflation of the inflatable portion 46 of blood pressure cuff 45. Due to the fact that the pressure in the interior of cavity 54 is equal to the pressure in the inflatable portion 46, there is no possibility of the cavity 54 collapsing. Furthermore, as the atmosphere in the transmission duct 47 and cavity 54 is much more dense than ambient, sound is more readily transmitted from membrane 52 to cavity 54 and from there to the membrane 15 mounted at the bottom of the earpiece illustrated in FIG. 1a than is possible with the conventional stethoscope which has an ambient atmosphere within its sound transmission duct.

The flexible walls 55 and 56 which define the inflatable portion 46, meet at juncture 57, at which point wall 55 continues to form flexible wall 58. A Velcro fastener 60 is provided on the exterior surface on flexible wall 56 and on the interior side of the terminating end of flexible wall 58 in order to provide a means to secure the cuff in its wrapped position around a portion of the human body.

If desired, the inflatable portion 46 of the cuff 45 may be employed as the stethoscope audio pickup instead of the cavity 54 of body 51. However, the pickup body 51 is better insulated from the pickup of unwanted outside noises.

In FIGS. 5, 6 and 7, like elements as those which appear in the previously mentioned figures are given the same numeral designation.

In order to provide neat storage and unentanglement of the sphygmomanometer of the present invention, the present invention is further characterized by a storage housing 61 which has mounted therein a bias tube retractionmeans which in this instance consists of two retraction spools or reels 62 and 63 respectively, to permit the withdrawal of a desired length of the flexible duct or tubing 14 and 41 from the housing and automatic retraction thereof upon the actuation of a release actuated by a light tug on either of the flexible tubes 14 or 41.

The reels 62 and 63 are internally spring biased for retraction relative to their stationary axles 68 which are rigidly mounted to brackets 64 by means of the machine screws 65. Brackets 64 are in turn rigidly mounted to the bottom wall of housing '61 by means of the machine screws and nuts 66.

The small covers 67 on the outside ends of reels 62 and 63 house a ratchet that engages and holds the reels stationary relative to their axes 6 8 until a light pull or tug is made on the respective tubular duct 14 or 41 such that the reel is disengaged and the internal torsion springs within the reels 62 and 63 urge the same to reel up their respective tubes and maintain the ratchet disengaged by the application of the generated centrifugal force of the rotating reels until tubes 14 or 41 have been fully retracted or otherwise stopped at a desired point. Such reels are commonly used on a large scale in other industries.

A rotary sealed journal 70 is provided on the internal hub of the reels 62 and 63 to permit the transmission of sound and a gas under pressure from the respective tubes 14 and 41 through curved tubes 71 into the stationary metal cross-shaped coupling 72 which connects the transmission duct therein to manometer 37 and to a pneumatic inflation means or pump which will have its flexible line connected to the nipple 73 of the downwardly extending leg of the cross-shaped coupling 72 which extends through the bottom of housing 61.

The housing 6-1 is preferably molded of a plastic such as fiber glass or the like, such that it has smooth exterior contour and may be provided with a removable back 74 to permit the front face 75, as shown in FIG. 6, to be unitarily molded with the side faces of the housing 6-1.

In order to prevent the flexible tubes 14 and 4 1 from becoming damaged due to frictional engagement against their respective openings 76 and 77 in face 75, four rollers 78 are provided in opposed relationship about the respective opening 76. These rollers 78 are permitted to axially rotate on their respective axes 79 which are securely riveted to the face 75 of housing 61 by means of the rivets 80.

The housing 61 may be provided with any conventional mounting means such that it may be secured to a wall or clamped to a pole or the like to provide any convenient storage location desired. Further convenience is provided by the fact that earpiece 1 and cuff 45 may be readily interchanged in position.

The pneumatic inflation means or pump preferably employed with the unit as disclosed in FIGS. and 6, is a foot-operated pneumatic pump such as that shown in FIGS. 7a and 7b. This foot-operated pump consists of a weighted base 80 having two foot-operated bellows 81 and 82 mounted on the top thereof and hinged at 89.

Foot bellows 81 is operated to inflate the inflatable portion of blood pressure cuff 45 via flexible tubing 83, cross-shaped coupler 72 of FIG. 5 and flexible hose or duct 41. Foot pedal 82 is operated to controllably deflate the pneumatically inflated cuff 45.

Bellows 81 is provided with a check valve air inlet 84 and a check valve air outlet 85 which leads to passage 86 and flexible tube 83. Bellows 81 is preferably spring biased to continually urge the same in its unpressed condition.

Bellows or pedal 82 is operable to controllably deflate the air pressure within the inflatable portion of the blood pressure cuff 45 (and consequently the pressure within passage 86) by releasing the plug valve 88.

When bellows 82 is depressed, pedal 90 lying thereunder and supported on stem 91 is also depressed against the bias of compression spring 92, thereby pivoting link arm 93 about pivot 94 supported by the pivot arm 95 in order to raise the plug 99 of the plug valve 88 to release the gas under pressure retained within passage 86. Thus, by controlling the amount of depression of bellows 82 and pedal 90, one may readily regulate the release of the gaseous pressure contained within the inflatable portion 46 of the blood pressure cuff 45.

In this manner the physician has both hands free in order to carry out other required tasks while obtaining a blood pressure reading within the shortest possible time.

I claim:'

1. A sphygmomanometer comprising a constriction blood pressure cuff having a pliable inflatable portion and means adapted to secure the same about a portion of the human body, stethoscope audio pickup means in said cuff having a cavity to receive sound transmissions, a connection duct connecting said cavity to a stethoscope earpiece having at least one ear terminus, said duct together with said cavity and said earpiece providing a sound transmission duct for transmission of sound from the said cavity to said ear terminus, said sound duct and the interior of said inflatable portion being pneumatically connected, at least two spaced diaphragm means in said sound transmission duct pneumatically sealing the interior of said inflatable portion from the cuff exterior and from said ear terminus to permit the maintenance of a pneumatic pressure in said inflatable portion while permitting said sound transmission to said ear terminus, inflating means and manometer means connected to said sound transmission duct at any position therealong wherein they are pneumatically exposed to the interior of said inflatable portion to pneumatically inflate and deflate said inflatable portion and to indicate the pneumatic pressure retained therein respectively.

2. The sphygmomanometer of claim 1 characterized in that said at least two spaced diaphragm means block said sound transmission duct adjacent its opposite ends.

3. The sphygmomanometer of claim 2 characterized by a further sound transmission diaphragm. means pneumatically sealing said sound transmission duct between said ear terminus of said earpiece and the adjacent of said spaced diaphragms.

4. The sphygmomanometer of claim 3 characterized by a check valve in said sound transmission duct between said adjacent diaphragm and, said further diaphragm means and operable to exhaust gas under pressure in said duct to the exterior.

5. The sphygmomanometer of claim 1 characterized in that one of said spaced diaphragm means comprises a wall portion of said inflatable portion of said blood pressure cuff, said wall portion pneumatically sealing said cavity relative to the cuff exterior.

6. The sphygmomanometer of claim 1 characterized by a housing, biased tube retraction means mounted in said housing and receiving a flexible portion of said connection duct therethrough to permit withdrawal of a desired length of said flexible duct from said housing and automatic retraction thereof upon actuation of a release.

7. The sphygmomanometer of claim 6 characterized by second biased tube retraction means mounted in said housing and receiving a second flexible portion of said connection duct therethrough to permit withdrawal of a desired length of said flexible duct from. said housing and automatic retraction thereof upon actuation of a release, said cuff and audio pickup combination and said stethoscope earpiece connected to the two exposed ends of said connection duct respectively.

8. The sphygmomanometer of claim 6 characterized in that said inflation means is a foot-operated air pump having foot-operated deflation means, said pump being connected to said sound transmission duct within said housing.

9. The sphygmomanometer of claim 8 characterized in that said manometer is mounted in said housing for exterior viewing.

10. A sphygmomanometer comprising an inflatable blood pressure cuff having means adapted to secure the same about a portion of the human body, a stethoscope audio pickup secured to said cuff, flexible duct means connected to said cuff and stethoscope pickup combination to provide gas under pressure thereto for inflation of said cuff and adapted to convey sound from said pickup for ausculatory measurements of blood pressure, a housing, biased tube retraction means mounted in said housing and receiving said flexible duct means through said housing to permit withdrawal of a desired length of said flexible duct therefrom and automatic retraction thereof upon actuation of a release, a stethoscope earpiece, a sound transmission duct having one end connected to said earpiece and the other end received in said housing and connected to the housing received end of said duct means adapted to permit the transmission of said sounds to the ear of an operator, pneumatic inflation means for the inflation and deflation of said cuff, a gas inflation duct having one end connected to the housing received end of said duct means to permit the inflation and deflation of said cuff and an opposite end connected to said inflation means, and manometer means in communication with said gas inflation duct.

'11. The sphygmomanometer of claim 10 characterized in that said inflation means is a foot operated pneumatic pump having a foot operable deflation release valve.

12. The sphygmomanometer of claim 10 characterized in that said flexible duct means consists of two independent flexible tubes connected to said pickup and said inflatable cuff respectively, said biased tube retraction means consisting of a spring biased self-Wind spool having releasable lock means and pneumatic coupling means for independent connection of said tubes to said spool With stationary independent axial outlets for connection to their respective of said sound transmission duct and pneumatic inflation duct.

13. The sphy-gmomanometer of claim 10 characterized by a second duct retraction means mounted in said housing and receiving a flexible portion of said sound transmission duct to permit withdrawal of a desired length References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner K. L. HOWELL, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

thereof from said housing and automatic retraction there- 15 128M105 Sp; g

of upon actuation of a release.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3757772 *Aug 27, 1971Sep 11, 1973Goldblat ADisposable combined sphygmomanometer cuff and sound chamber
US3999625 *Oct 15, 1975Dec 28, 1976L. P. S. IncorporatedDevice for simultaneous modulation and amplification of low frequency sounds
US4121620 *Dec 17, 1976Oct 24, 1978L.P.S. IncorporatedDevice for simultaneous modulation and amplification of low frequency sounds
US4282678 *Apr 25, 1980Aug 11, 1981Arco Industries, Ltd.Toy to simulate heartbeats and a stethoscope
US6514213 *Oct 3, 2000Feb 4, 2003Moteki Industries, Inc.Earpiece assembly for a stethoscope
US7722543 *Aug 11, 2006May 25, 2010Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.Blood pressure measuring device
US8075493 *Jan 10, 2007Dec 13, 2011Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.Blood pressure measuring device
US20060201015 *Mar 8, 2005Sep 14, 2006Darryl RussellManual drying device and method therefor
US20070038133 *Aug 11, 2006Feb 15, 2007Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.Blood pressure measuring device
US20070197923 *Jan 10, 2007Aug 23, 2007Omron Healthcare Co., Ltd.Blood pressure measuring device
US20130310227 *May 18, 2012Nov 21, 2013Sean WheelerFoot strengthening device and method
CN1911162BAug 10, 2006May 18, 2011欧姆龙健康医疗事业株式会社Blood pressure measuring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/490, D24/134, 181/131
International ClassificationA61B7/02, A61B5/022
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/022, A61B7/02, A61B5/02141, A61B5/02233
European ClassificationA61B5/021F, A61B7/02, A61B5/022D, A61B5/022